Local is now digital: Understanding the new local shopper

COVID-19 has fundamentally changed how consumers shop worldwide; they rely more on the Internet to research and discover products to buy. For example, search interest for products like the “best exercise bikes,” “best ring lights” and “best air fryers” increased by 100% or more in the last year. To make it easier for consumers to discover top products and the best places to buy them, Google launched the Best Things for Everything Guide.

We’ve seen that shoppers don’t just turn to Google for things they want to buy on the web; they also use Google to find what they need nearby. Over the past year, we’ve seen a significant increase in commercial intent across Google including Google Search, Google Maps and YouTube.

Finding what’s nearby on Google Search

Whether it’s to support small businesses in their community or ensure a nearby store has the item they need in stock, consumers are using Google Search to thoughtfully research their shopping trips in advance. 

  • Searches for “local” + “business(es)” have grown by more than 80% year over year, including searches like “local businesses near me” and “support local businesses.”
  • Searches for “who has” + “in stock” have grown by more than 8,000% year over, including searches like “who has nintendo switch in stock” and “who has gym equipment in stock.”
Icon of a blue rising arrow over a store icon. Text says: "Searches for "who has" + "in stock" have grown by over 8000% year over year in the U.S.

Beyond retail searches, we’ve seen an increase in online research before heading out to a restaurant or to get takeout. At Google, we recently found that:

  • Two out of three dining consumers said they used search to find food and beverage information during the pandemic.
  • Fifty-seven percent of dining consumers said they discovered food and beverage information during the pandemic via online ads.

Exploring new products on YouTube

YouTube has become a critical part of not just the shopping process, but the local shopping process too. In a recent U.S. Google/Talkshoppe study, we found that:

  • Forty-five percent of viewers say they watch YouTube to see a product demo before buying.
  • Viewers say they are 2x more likely to go in-store or online to buy something they saw on YouTube versus the competitive average.

Starting their journey on Google Maps

Google Maps has become a more critical part of the local user experience, as people use Maps to explore something they’re interested in, versus just for navigation:

  • Searches on Google Maps for “curbside pickup” have increased nearly 9000% year over year in the U.S.
  • Searches on Google Maps for “discounts” have grown globally by more than 100% year over year.
  • Searches on Google Maps for “gift shop” have grown globally by more than 60% year over year.

Read more

#GoogleAds

How To Add Your Business to Google & Google Maps

When a query performed on Google implies local results should be shown, the search engine populates a map pack of 3 local results. The map pack has many other names, including “local pack,” or the “Google 3-pack.” 

If you own or operate a business that caters to your local community, chances are you qualify to get a Google My Business listing. A quality Google My Business listing can get you one step closer to being added to a local pack. 

In this guide, we’ll explore the best way to add your business on Google My Business and offer some tips to increase your local rankings.

Why is Google My Business important?

Back in March 2021, Google noted that there are more than 2 billion visits to local websites each month. That’s a lot of website traffic. 

If you’re a small business owner, your #1 driver of new business is likely going to be referrals. 

Referrals are great! 

But, even with a referral, most people will still Google your business name to learn more about your business, read reviews, etc — before even contacting you. 

What happens when I perform a search on Google for “Cowboy Dinner Tree?” – Read more

How Google Ads and SEO Strategies Help to Grow Your Business

If you want your business to succeed and make it popular in the industry, you want it to be visible on Google. It is the primary platform all over the world for people searching for information about any topic. If your business shows up in the top 5 Google search results, you can expect successful click-through and conversion results. However, if it gets lost beyond the first page, it will be difficult for your potential customers to find it unless they specifically look for you.

You want to make sure that you have the right tools to achieve this position. Google Ads and SEO strategies work hand-in-hand to put your business on the map. After all, if your company is not visible on the internet, it won’t gain much traction in this day and age. Almost everyone avails services like Spectrum internet connections to gain constant access to the worldwide web. Therefore, it is necessary for you to use Google Ads and SEO planning to grow your business. They help you achieve success in the following ways and many more.

Put You In The Top Google Search Results

If you focus on Google Ads, you will automatically be placed in the top search results on Google. They even have precedence over the top organic search results. Therefore, it is well worth investing in Google Ads.

The Adwords tool is extremely intuitive and lets you know which keywords will reap the best results, and place you at the top. In addition, you can also overtake your competitors by seeing which keywords they succeed for organically and creating Google Ads with them. However, it is inadvisable to poach words related to their brand or product directly, as Google is smart enough to detect such deceptive practices.

Give You Unlimited Potential Leads

Scalability is a big advantage with solid SEO strategies and Google Ads. Theoretically, you can access a limitless number of potential leads with these methods. This is because new people may be searching keywords related to you every single day.

Therefore, if you properly plan your SEO strategies and run intelligent Google Ad campaigns, you can gain a significant number of genuine leads with potential conversions.

Make Remarketing More Convenient

Often, just seeing your product or services once won’t be enough for a potential customer. You might need as many as 4-5 contact instances to get the customer to actually access your website and buy something.

With efficient Google Ads and SEO strategies, you can connect with your audience at multiple points of the lifecycle multiple times, leading to higher conversion rates. This remarketing is often automatically targeted at people who have previously shown interest in your business or any of its related keywords. – Read more

#GoogleAds #SEOStrategies

Facebook Ads vs. Google Ads: Which is Better for Your Brand?

Facebook Ads vs. Google Ads: Which is Better for Your Brand?

If you’re reading this article, it’s likely because you’re considering running digital ads.

You’ve heard about Facebook Ads and Google Ads but you’re still unclear on the difference between the two platforms.

In this article, we’ll cover each platform’s unique features, the key differences to keep in mind, and the factors to consider when deciding which ad platform to use.

Let’s get started.

What is the difference between Facebook Ads and Google Ads?

Facebook Ads is an advertising platform used for paid social campaigns on Facebook while Google Ads run search and display ads. While they both run pay-per-click (PPC) ads, they do so on separate channels and often target users at different stages in the buyer’s journey.

These platforms are often pitted against each other but in fact, Facebook Ads and Google Ads are complementary, each offering unique benefits to marketers.

If your team can only focus on one, there are a few things you’ll want to consider.

Your Campaign Goal

What do you want to accomplish with your campaign? Is it brand awareness, leads, sales, or something else? Knowing this answer can already steer you in the right direction.

Google Ads is ideal for demand capture – meaning reaching users who have high purchase intent. For instance, if I’m looking up the keyword “water bottle,” this may signal an interest in purchasing one.

With that in mind, the ads below align well with search intent and can lead to sales.

Google search ad example

Facebook Ads, on the other hand, is ideal for reaching consumers who are near the top of the funnel, (i.e., great for brand and product awareness). – Read more

#GoogleAds #FacebookAds

Local is now digital: Understanding the new local shopper

Local is now digital: Understanding the new local shopper

COVID-19 has fundamentally changed how consumers shop worldwide; they rely more on the Internet to research and discover products to buy. For example, search interest for products like the “best exercise bikes,” “best ring lights” and “best air fryers” increased by 100% or more in the last year. To make it easier for consumers to discover top products and the best places to buy them, Google launched the Best Things for Everything Guide.

We’ve seen that shoppers don’t just turn to Google for things they want to buy on the web; they also use Google to find what they need nearby. Over the past year, we’ve seen a significant increase in commercial intent across Google including Google Search, Google Maps and YouTube.

Finding what’s nearby on Google Search

Whether it’s to support small businesses in their community or ensure a nearby store has the item they need in stock, consumers are using Google Search to thoughtfully research their shopping trips in advance. 

  • Searches for “local” + “business(es)” have grown by more than 80% year over year, including searches like “local businesses near me” and “support local businesses.”
  • Searches for “who has” + “in stock” have grown by more than 8,000% year over, including searches like “who has nintendo switch in stock” and “who has gym equipment in stock.”
Icon of a blue rising arrow over a store icon. Text says: "Searches for "who has" + "in stock" have grown by over 8000% year over year in the U.S.

Beyond retail searches, we’ve seen an increase in online research before heading out to a restaurant or to get takeout. At Google, we recently found that:

  • Two out of three dining consumers said they used search to find food and beverage information during the pandemic.
  • Fifty-seven percent of dining consumers said they discovered food and beverage information during the pandemic via online ads.

Exploring new products on YouTube

YouTube has become a critical part of not just the shopping process, but the local shopping process too. In a recent U.S. Google/Talkshoppe study, we found that:

  • Forty-five percent of viewers say they watch YouTube to see a product demo before buying.
  • Viewers say they are 2x more likely to go in-store or online to buy something they saw on YouTube versus the competitive average.

Starting their journey on Google Maps

Google Maps has become a more critical part of the local user experience, as people use Maps to explore something they’re interested in, versus just for navigation: – Read more

Local is now digital: Understanding the new local shopper

COVID-19 has fundamentally changed how consumers shop worldwide; they rely more on the Internet to research and discover products to buy. For example, search interest for products like the “best exercise bikes,” “best ring lights” and “best air fryers” increased by 100% or more in the last year. To make it easier for consumers to discover top products and the best places to buy them, Google launched the Best Things for Everything Guide.

We’ve seen that shoppers don’t just turn to Google for things they want to buy on the web; they also use Google to find what they need nearby. Over the past year, we’ve seen a significant increase in commercial intent across Google including Google Search, Google Maps and YouTube.

Finding what’s nearby on Google Search

Whether it’s to support small businesses in their community or ensure a nearby store has the item they need in stock, consumers are using Google Search to thoughtfully research their shopping trips in advance. 

  • Searches for “local” + “business(es)” have grown by more than 80% year over year, including searches like “local businesses near me” and “support local businesses.”
  • Searches for “who has” + “in stock” have grown by more than 8,000% year over, including searches like “who has nintendo switch in stock” and “who has gym equipment in stock.”
Icon of a blue rising arrow over a store icon. Text says: "Searches for "who has" + "in stock" have grown by over 8000% year over year in the U.S.

Beyond retail searches, we’ve seen an increase in online research before heading out to a restaurant or to get takeout. At Google, we recently found that:

  • Two out of three dining consumers said they used search to find food and beverage information during the pandemic.
  • Fifty-seven percent of dining consumers said they discovered food and beverage information during the pandemic via online ads.

Exploring new products on YouTube

YouTube has become a critical part of not just the shopping process, but the local shopping process too. In a recent U.S. Google/Talkshoppe study, we found that:

  • Forty-five percent of viewers say they watch YouTube to see a product demo before buying.
  • Viewers say they are 2x more likely to go in-store or online to buy something they saw on YouTube versus the competitive average.

Starting their journey on Google Maps

Google Maps has become a more critical part of the local user experience, as people use Maps to explore something they’re interested in, versus just for navigation: – Read more

4 Key Reasons Local Businesses Fail When Using Google AdWords

If you’ve tried Google AdWords and had little to no success, find out what you could have doing wrong.

The following excerpt is from Perry Marshall’s book Ultimate Guide to Local Business Marketing

Perry Marshall and lead generation expert Talor Zamir introduce you to the basic framework behind a successful local marketing campaign. In this edited excerpt, Perry and Zamir offer four reasons why your Google AdWords campaign may be failing.

You’ve likely heard other business owners trashing Google AdWords as expensive, complicated, and ineffective. Good, let them! That just means there’ll be less competition for you.

AdWords does get a bad rap in many circles, and while clicks are expensive for most people and the interface complex, most of the time when advertisers get bad results, they only have themselves (or those they hire to manage their campaigns) to blame.

There are four main reasons local businesses fail with Google AdWords. Let’s cover them briefly here so you know what you’re in for.

1. No landing page or an awful landing page.

The first page a visitor to your site lands on after clicking on your Google ad is called the landing page. A landing page is an essential part of your AdWords campaign, and a good one can instantly double your leads from AdWords (without spending a penny more on clicks).

I recently clicked on an ad for a family law attorney. You’d think that would lead me to a site about family law, but instead, their home page was all about personal injury law. That’s not what I was looking for. Plus, it was an old, ugly-looking site that made it hard for me to find any information. When I finally found the page on the site about family law, it was a two-paragraph little blurb that basically said they’re certified by the State Bar in family law (don’t they have to be to even practice in the first place?).

Not having a dedicated, high-converting landing page is a huge mistake. Based on experience, we estimate the typical local business website converts somewhere around 5 percent. On the other hand, a better-designed landing page can easily convert at 10 percent to 20 percent.

Even if we assume it just converts on the low end — around 10 percent — versus the 5 percent for the typical website, you’d double the amount of leads you get for the same money spent. That means for every $1,000 you spend, instead of getting 10 leads, you’re now getting 20. That difference could literally make or break your month or year.

2. Horrible ads with low clickthrough rates.

Most Google ads say basically the same thing. (And, quite frankly, they’re not all that compelling in the way they say it.)https://5f5bb0d16913097ec5f21c92d081ad60.safeframe.googlesyndication.com/safeframe/1-0-38/html/container.html

As with landing pages, a high-converting Google ad with a high clickthrough rate (CTR) can also instantly double your leads. And the best part is that Google rewards you for having high-converting ads. So not only will doubling your CTR get you twice as many potential leads, but you can also end up paying a lot less per click.

That’s because Google has an algorithm known as Quality Score that determines how much you pay for clicks. In AdWords, just because you bid the most for a keyword doesn’t guarantee your ad will show up in the top position. Google rewards relevancy. And if you can show Google your ad is more relevant than your competitors (and CTR is the number-one factor used to determine relevancy), you can end up ranking higher than your competitors, yet pay less per click than they do. – Read more

#GoogleAds

Why Every Startup Should Invest in Google Adwords Campaigns

Why Every Startup Should Invest in Google Adwords Campaigns

PPC stands for pay-per-click. As the name suggests, it’s the kind of advertising where you have to pay for each click you get on your ad. It’s a part of every digital marketing campaign, and most experienced businessmen consider it an effective tactic with a measurable return on investment.

There are several channels that offer PPC advertising, but Google stands at the top among them. Although its competitors, such as Facebook, are also not weak, Google Adwords offers a service that no one else can offer.

Here I’ve shared why you must invest in Google Adwords even if you have a very short marketing budget.

No Need to Build Authority

Google is used by billions of people, including your target audience. They search relevant queries on this search engine, and it shows the most relevant results from various websites. As a business, you would want to be among the top five results to get maximum visitors to your website.

If you know the basics of keyword research, you would know that there must be at least hundreds of searches every month relevant to your niche. This number can go in millions, depending on your niche. The higher the number, the more difficult it is to rank for keywords.

There are already many websites trying to rank for them and they have probably invested way more than you. Even if you work smart and hard, it’ll still take at least one year to build authority and rank in the top results.

It’s better and easier to just run an Adwords campaign for those keywords and secure the top position. However, there is a chance that your competitors are also running the same PPC campaigns. This means there would be more than one ad at the top.

You should get the help of a digital marketing agency to make sure you choose the right keywords, perform better than your competitors, and attract maximum and relevant visitors to your website. You can visit the website of Summon Digital to find out more about how you can get a better return on investment in PPC through the help of a service.

Only Pay for the Clicks

The best thing about PPC Google Adwords is the return on investment. You don’t have to worry about wasting your money on something that is not paying off. You invested in getting visitors on your website and that’s exactly what it does.

You don’t have to pay a single penny if you don’t get any clicks on the ad. The ad takes the person to your website. This means that you are basically paying for each visitor. Think of your website as an online branch of your business. The advertisement will get people to your office or branch and the next is up to you how they are engaged and convinced. – Read more

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6 essential Google tools for website SEO

6 essential Google tools for website SEO

The top six Google tools to help grow your website SEO score

Building a website has never been easier than it is today. However, building a successful website is getting harder and harder in a highly crowded space, especially when considering the importance of website SEO (search engine optimization).

While choosing the best web hosting for your website will go a long way to helping you succeed, there are numerous  other tools you should be make use of, and Google’s toolkit is a great place to start. 

In this article, we look at six of the best Google tools. If you’re not already taking advantage of them, it might be time to change the way you work. 

1. Google Ads

If you’ve ever searched for something on Google, you will know what Google Ads look like. Usually, the first one or two results are sponsored listings, which basically means that they are ads. Since these are the first things people see when browsing a particular search term, there’s a decent chance that they will click on one and navigate to the advertiser’s website. 

Of course, this isn’t free, and it can cost quite a bit if you don’t know what you’re doing. But learn how to run effective ads, and you will soon be driving a decent amount of traffic to your website, no matter your budget.

2. Google Analytics

When you own a website, it’s important to understand how it’s performing at all times. It might be that you’re suffering from a high bounce rate, but don’t know why. Or perhaps you’d like to know what your main traffic sources are. Whatever information you’re looking for, Google Analytics can help. 

To get started, you will have to link your website to your analytics console. There are a few ways to do this, but the easiest is to paste a small code snippet into your website source code. Google provides a full tutorial on how to do this. 

Once you’re connected, you will be able to access your analytics portal, where you will find information on everything from visitor demographics and source to your most popular content. And as you can imagine, this information is extremely useful for making future business decisions. – Read more

Google Ads New & Improved Match Types. Goodbye BMM!

Google Ads New & Improved Match Types. Goodbye BMM!

Google recently announced the next evolution in its Keyword Match Types. In February 2021 we said “goodbye” to BMM and “hello” to the new & improved Phrase Match Type. In addition, Exact Match is more powerful and predictable, and Broad Match now considers more signals which should reduce the number of irrelevant search queries. Over the past few years Google has accelerated the pace of change to keywords. In exchange for taking away the control that Match Types once offered, Google continues to push solutions with better automation to help make decisions in auctions for advertisers. Today we explore what these changes mean and what you need to do about them. 

What’s changed to Match Types?

Overall, Google has made 3 changes to simplify Match Types:

  1. Broad Match Modifier (BMM) is dead. This is being absorbed into an evolved version of Phrase Match.
  2. Exact Match becomes more predictable. Similar to how it used to be.
  3. Broad Match should now deliver less irrelevant search queries due to the addition of new signals intended to deliver better relevance for the advertiser and user.

What does this mean?

Long term, Less time managing keywords. Short term, you’re going to be busy restructuring

Both BMM and Phrase tend to cover some of the same use cases. By sunsetting BMM, it makes accounts easier to manage. Long term, it will require a shift in Best Practice from the use of BMM to Phrase Match, so we’ll probably be spending most of the first half of 2021 restructuring accounts to accommodate these changes.

How will Phrase Match change?

Let’s explore the example that Google provided us. If you are currently targeting +moving +services +NYC +to +Boston as a Broad Match Modifier keyword you may appear against the search query “moving services NYC to Boston”. What’s annoying about BMM for this example is that it can also target “moving services Boston to NYC”. Obviously the intent is completely different here as it’s the opposite direction. This could serve irrelevant ads which reduce performance efficiency.

Of course, you should have the correct account structure and negative keywords in place to eliminate this with BMM. This creates granular approaches to accounts and ultimately gives advertisers a lot of control which Google thinks breeds bad practice for effective automation.

To combat this, the updated Phrase Match will continue to respect the word order which means much simpler account setups.Google Ads Help Keyword Match Types

Credit: Google Ads Help, 2021

With Phrase Match in the above example, the direction in the keyword will match the search query with the same intent. Here’s some more examples that Google has highlighted will take place after this update:Google Ads Help Keyword Match Types

Credit: Google Ads Help, 2021

Broad Match becomes more relevant

It’s a slight change, but it’s pretty impactful for Broad Match. Historically, Broad Match has always been “too broad” which would sometimes see advertisers targeting irrelevant search queries. This update will add in additional signals within the match type criteria which should improve both quality and relevance of the search queries.

An example of one of the signals is the Landing Page. Landing Pages will now be used as a sign to better qualify the relevance to a given search query. Think of it almost like how Dynamic Search Ad targeting acts today – without the dynamic ads.

Exact Match is more powerful

Google is making changes to Exact Match too by making it more precise. Other Match Types, or even close variants with a higher Ad Rank, will no longer compete with a query that is identical to the Exact Match. Put simply, search queries that exactly match the Exact Match keyword will always be preferred over other Match Types and variants. This is definitely a good thing. – Read more

#GoogleAds

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