8 Steps to Achieve Personalized Ecommerce for Better Sales

Customers have come to expect personalization when they’re shopping online. They’re starting to see this as a standard service and appreciate receiving special, tailored offers. 

Ecommerce personalization enables you to treat every customer like a VIP. And when customers feel like VIPs they’re more likely to stay loyal to your brand. 

Ways to keep customers happy include providing them with a seamless customer service experience. For example, implementing VoIP technology is a great way to handle incoming calls. Other ways to keep satisfaction levels high include offering a customized shopping experience like no other. 

Follow these eight steps to create a winning website personalization strategy.

1. Encourage customers to create accounts 

In order to build a customer profile (or buyer persona) you need to gather data from your existing subscribers and buyers. One good source of data is the information that’s input when a customer signs up to buy or subscribe to your newsletter. When you have amassed enough data you can dig through it to identify common traits that many of your customers have. Such as, if they are in specific age groups or genders. Then you can use this information to help you create an ideal customer profile and targeted campaigns for people in those demographics. 

Having customer profiles will help you implement personalization strategies. It will help you monitor your customers’ behaviors (This is something that customers are generally happy[1] for you to do, so long as it leads to them having an improved shopping experience). 

Once you can identify customers by their profiles, you’ll be able to offer them products or information that may be of interest to them. 

When you ask people to create accounts, make it easy for them to do so by adding a checkbox at the checkout that nudges the customers to add their details. 

2. Segment email subscribers

You can segment your email lists by geographic data, demographic data, psychographic data (lifestyle, activities, etc.), and behavioral data (based on purchases, browsing behaviors, etc.)

the key pillars of segmentation
Image Source: [2]

Once you’ve segmented your lists you can make sure you send appropriate content, for instance, based on a customer’s location. Say you’re promoting a ‘winter sale’. You only want to send out emails to subscribers in locations that are currently, or are soon going to be, wintry.

Pair your email campaign with a landing page to boost conversion rates. Send subscribers an email that reflects their purchasing history – along with a link to a landing page that tells them more about those products or services. Linking them to a specific landing page (rather than the generic homepage) increases the likelihood of them taking action. 

Personalize email subject lines to include subscribers’ first names and send out celebratory birthday emails with special money off vouchers.

Other ways of personalizing include sending emails inviting customers to leave their opinions. These business review examples can give you an opportunity to reply personally to subscribers who love your brand as well as respond to criticisms. 

3. Create personalized homepages

Homepages are your online store’s front door. So apart from making sure, your landing page is optimized, make sure you give customers a warm personalized welcome based on their purchases or browsing history. By using tracking cookies you can see which pages a previous user has visited and present them offers that might be relevant to them. 

If, for example, someone has previously visited a blog on ‘how to start an ecommerce business’, next time they visit you could invite them to download an eBook on order management systems.

Or, for instance, if someone has previously browsed the ‘15% off boots section’ on the ‘women’s sale’ page you can show them ‘new women’s boots just-in’’ on the homepage next time they browse your site. 

4. Provide personalized online store assistance 

Invite customers to participate in quick quizzes around the size or style of items they’re looking to buy. By storing the results, you can personalize product suggestions. If you’re a fashion e-retailer you could provide personalized wardrobe suggestions that fit budgets, sizes, and tastes. 

Having this information also opens up further marketing opportunities in terms of email updates about new products that might fit the bill. If, for example, a customer has expressed an interest in creating sales literature for their website, you could send them an email inviting them to use your online digital brochure maker. – Read more

7+ Facts About Shopping Cart Abandonment & Recovery

Shopping cart abandonment is the most heartbreaking of conversion killers. it is also a fertile place to increase the performance of your website.

Shopping cart abandonment is like cholesterol: There is a good kind and a bad kind. For each there is a strategy for reducing the impact of abandonment on your business.

Good abandoners leave because they aren’t done with their shopping process.

Bad abandoners leave because you surprised them or didn’t provide the information they were looking for.

But it’s 2020, and the number of smartphone dependent shoppers has grown considerably. Thus, we will add one more layer of complexity to the shopping cart abandonment recovery strategy: desktop vs mobile visitors. Why it happens and what to do about it.

Cart Abandonment Rate Formula

The shopping cart abandonment rate formula is quite an easy Key Performance Indicator (KPI) to calculate. Divide the total number of completed purchases by the number of shopping carts created within the same period. Subtract the resulting number from one and multiply by 100 to get the abandonment rate percentage.

Abandonment Rate Calculation Example

  • Total number of completed purchases: 335
  • Total number of shopping carts created: 500
  • Cart abandonment rate: ((500-335) / 500) * 100 = 33%

Definitely not a bad shopping cart abandonment rate. Only 33 out of 100 customers are leaving their carts behind. Do you experience high add to cart but low conversion rates? Keep reading.

Top 7 Cart Conversion Optimization Solutions to Eliminate the Causes of Cart Abandonment.

The difference between mobile and desktop visitors

“A growing share of Americans now use smartphones as their primary means of online access at home. Today roughly one-in-five American adults are “smartphone-only” internet users – meaning they own a smartphone, but do not have traditional home broadband service.”

Source: Surveys conducted 2013-2019. Data for each year based on a pooled analysis of all surveys containing broadband and smartphone questions fielded during that year.

Traditionally, the desktop computer is a research tool and the smartphone is a dopamine delivery system.

These are two very different uses of internet attached computers.

For someone on a desktop, adding your product to their cart is the end of a journey. For the mobile user, the add to cart is to see how it will feel.

For a growing segment of our population, this is changing. For more and more people, the smartphone is their only source for communication, research, and dopamine. Reliance on smartphones for online access is especially common among younger adults, non-whites and lower-income Americans.

For this reason, we are not going to assume that most mobile visitors are “just shopping.” We are going to look at the causes of checkout abandonment and provide a playbook for eliminating them.

There are also consumers who only buy your products on desktop computers. They would not even think to pick up their phone and buy what you sell.

Let’s dive into how to reduce shopping cart abandonment and improve conversions.

Why do Shoppers Abandon the Checkout Process?

Just as science has identified “good cholesterol” and “bad cholesterol,” there are “good” and “bad” abandoners among your website’s visitors.

The Good Abandoners

Good abandoners leave you as part of their process. They are walking all the way to the edge of buying, even though they are not ready to buy. They are imagining purchasing from you. Yet, they fully intend to continue comparing your offering to alternatives when they start the checkout process.

And they may be hoping you’ll hang on to their selections for when they return. Wish lists and persistent shopping carts are a big help to these abandoners. More on that later.

The challenge is to get them to come back and buy when they are done. We cover some of the strategies for retargeting this visitor later on this article.

The Bad Abandoners

Bad abandoners leave you because they didn’t like what they saw after they got started. These abandoners are bad for you because they are lost opportunities. They were going to buy, but you chased them away with your checkout process. – Read more

10 Best Ecommerce Tools to Sell More with Email Marketing

Email drives more repeat online purchases than search, direct, and social channels. Using the right ecommerce tools is key to growing your business online. Here are 10 popular ecommerce tools that integrate with AWeber.

Did you know 80% of retail professionals say email marketing is their most significant customer retention driver? Plus, it costs 5 times as much to attract new customers than to keep existing ones. That’s where email marketing becomes a vital tool to growing your business.

But we’re willing to bet that email marketing isn’t the only tool you use to run your ecommerce business. And it shouldn’t be. With the right ecommerce tools in your arsenal, it’s easy to turn first-time visitors into lifelong customers.

Pairing email marketing with top ecommerce tools can help businesses of all sizes automate their marketing and focus on growing their business.  

Email is incredibly effective at driving ecommerce sales

Email plays a pivotal role in encouraging a customer’s repeat purchases  — email drives more repeat sales that search, direct, and social channels

Integrating your email marketing with the right ecommerce tool can help you: 

  • Grow your audience through personalized communications and landing pages.
  • Tag prospects based on interest or buying habits to send more relevant and personalize emails.
  • Automate targeted email campaigns to segmented lists.
  • Send cart abandonment emails to close more sales based when customers leave products in their online shopping cart.

But finding the perfect ecommerce solution is no easy task. There are hundreds of providers to choose from. So to make it a bit easier for you, we identified 10 of our favorite ecommerce integration solutions that seamlessly integrate with AWeber. – Read more

How to Boost Your eCommerce Conversions and Make More Sales

With offline stores across the globe stalled due to the Covid-19 pandemic, shoppers and businesses are adopting eCommerce like never before.

As shown in the graph below, the value of global eCommerce sales reached USD3.5 billion in 2019. This figure can get almost double by 2023[1]

Graph Of Retail E Commerce Sales Worldwide From 2014 To 2023
A graph of retail e-commerce sales worldwide from 2014 to 2023
Image Source: [1]

A recent estimate[2] puts the number of global eCommerce firms between 2 and 3 million. This excludes businesses based in China. In order to get a foothold in the sector, learning how to improve your eCommerce conversion rate is paramount.

This eCommerce conversion rate guide brings you tips on generating more sales from the visitors on your site. 

How is eCommerce conversion measured?

An eCommerce conversion is a site visitor turned into a customer. Attempts to increase your eCommerce conversions are generally focused on the product page or pages and the checkout process. 

Take, for instance, a site that gets 1,000 visitors and makes 20 sales. Your calculation would be (20 / 1,000) x 100. That produces a resulting eCommerce conversion rate of 2%. While knowing your site’s conversion rate is important, understanding it is critical. 

The idea of measuring average conversion rates for your site is an excellent place to start with. 

Conversion benchmarks by sector

Millions of online stores that operate globally are spread across a plethora of sectors, offering a variety of products and services. However, conversion rates vary by industry. A study [3] by Littledata found the global average to be 1.4% across various industries and devices. However, you must dig a little deeper to genuinely understand your site performance.

It’s imperative to keep track of your industry’s performance and update yourself. You can do so by understanding how eCommerce conversion rate benchmarks stack up within your industry. This information is available online. 

IRP Commerce provides a kind of one-stop-shop for eCommerce market data [4]. You can find the average eCommerce conversion rates by industry here. For instance, you could use the site to find that the average rate for sports and recreation stores, as of March 2020, is 1.42% [5]. You can find similar information for a wide range of sectors. 

ecommerce conversion rate by industry
eCommerce conversion rate by industry
Image Source: [2]

Finding a benchmark for your sector is critical, as it helps you optimize your sales funnel to drive more conversions. 

How to improve your eCommerce conversion rate

They say that acknowledging a problem is the first step towards solving it. If you’ve discovered your conversion rate, you’ve already taken that first stride. You’ve identified that eCommerce A/B testing could be a part of the solution. In the following section, you will find six components in your existing optimization strategy that you can tweak to optimize your conversion rates.

User flow and UI

User flow defines the visitor’s journey on your website as they accomplish a task. Don’t make your prospects struggle on your web page to do so.

You can start optimizing the user flow as the first step in your eCommerce conversions optimization efforts. In the case of eCommerce websites, a user journey can have multiple steps before they make an actual purchase. These steps can be termed as micro conversions, which can include signing up for your website, adding a product to cart, clicking on a discount link, etc.

Micro conversions should direct the user towards the main conversion, that is, a purchase. This journey has to be as seamless as possible and avoid any friction that might result in visitor’s expulsion from the sales funnel. – Read more