What Is Last Click Attribution and How to Use It

Last Click Attribution Model

In this blog post, we’ll cover all things last click attribution including how it’s defined, what makes it unique, how your marketing team can use it, and more.

What is last click attribution?

A last click attribution model is when you give all of the credit for a conversion to the last touchpoint in the buyer’s journey — it assumes the final touchpoint is what ultimately influenced the lead’s decision to convert.

Pros and Cons of Last Click Attribution

Last click attribution is helpful if you want to know which of your marketing channels and touchpoints have the most influence in the final stage of the buyer’s journey.

While this is helpful information, it doesn’t account for the numerous other channels and touchpoints that impacted a customer from the very start of the buyer’s journey. This is important to note since there are a variety of touchpoints, across numerous channels, that impact a lead throughout the buyer’s journey — which is why most marketers today refrain from only using last click attribution. Rather, they’ll use multi-touch attribution or include last-click as part of their other marketing attribution efforts.

For instance, say a lead received an email from your email campaign, clicked through to your website, read a blog post, and then decided they wanted to buy your product. Well, last click attribution would only account for that last touchpoint — the blog post. Meanwhile, the other touchpoints throughout the buyer’s journey that contributed to this lead’s decision are dismissed.

That’s why multi-touch attribution has become such a popular attribution model among today’s marketers. Multi-touch attribution accounts for all of these touchpoints and channels and assigns them credit based on their influence.

In addition to last click and multi-touch attribution, you may have heard of first click attribution.

First Click vs. Last Click Attribution

FIrst click attribution differs from last click attribution because it assigns all of the credit for a conversion to the first touchpoint or channel (e.g. interaction on your website or with a marketing campaign) that a customer had before a conversion.

First click attribution is helpful if you want to know which of your marketing efforts are generating initial traffic in the awareness stage of the buyer’s journey.

Similar to last click attribution, this is a helpful attribution method on a small scale — combining it with other attribution methods is recommended in order to get a clear picture of your marketing attribution efforts.

Now, let’s talk about how your marketing team can use last click attribution.

How to Create a Last Click Attribution Report

If you choose to create a standalone last click attribution report, you’ll likely find yourself using an attribution tool.

If you already use an attribution tool, there’s a chance it has a specific report that focuses solely on the last click. There’s also a chance that it offers customizable attribution reports which would also allow you to create a last click report.

Either way, here are a few available options for your consideration as you look to create marketing attribution reports of your own. – Read more

#Advertising

The Beginner’s Guide to Reminder Advertising

When I go to bed every night, I have to set about five alarms for the morning.

I’m just the type of person that needs a lot of reminders to wake up on time.

In a similar vein, marketers use reminder advertising to stay top-of-mind with potential customers.

And it makes sense.

In the world of sales, 80% of sales require 5 follow-up calls after a meeting. For marketers, it’s no different.

Essentially, you have to nurture and continuously remind your audience who you are to convert leads.

In fact, companies excelling at lead nurturing generate 50% more sales-ready leads at 33% lower cost.

Below, let’s learn more about reminder advertising and see what it looks like in action.

Reminder advertising is a paid method of marketing that targets people in your audience who are in the consideration stage of the buying process.

During this stage, users are reviewing their options. They’re aware of their problem and the companies that might be able to help them. Now, they’re trying to figure out which solution is the right way to go.

In this stage, it’s important to stay at the forefront of your audience’s mind. That’s where reminder advertising comes in.

Another way to use reminder advertising is if you own a retail or ecommerce store. With a reminder ad, you can inspire customers to buy more products from you.

In this case, reminder advertising can help customers remember that they like your store and products.

Additionally, you can use reminder advertising when you’re at the end of the product life cycle. For example, if a product has launched and you’re done with the growth phase, then you can use reminder advertising to keep people interested.

At this point, you might’ve noticed that this type of advertising doesn’t introduce a new product. Instead, these ads are targeted at customers who are already aware of your brand and the products you offer.

Also, these types of ads won’t contain a lot of information. Rather, they’ll just reinforce key messages and brand awareness. For instance, while you might include brief testimonials, usually just the name of the brand and product with a visual is enough.

The objective is to hopefully serve as a reminder for potential customers and increase demand for your product or service.

So, what tactics can you use for reminder advertising? Let’s take a look at a quick list below.

  • Retargeting: Retargeting is when users who were on your website or social media page start seeing ads for your company on other pages they visit online. The whole point of retargeting ads is to remind customers of a product or service they were looking at and didn’t buy. Retargeting is essentially a targeted reminder ad.
  • Abandoned cart emails: If a potential customer is on your website, adds a product to their cart, but doesn’t complete the purchase, you don’t want to lose that sale. To get them to complete their purchase, you can send them an abandoned cart email and remind them that they have items in their cart they may want to buy.
  • Email newsletters: An email newsletter is a great way to stay top-of-mind with your customers. If you’re regularly sending them valuable information and perhaps including special offers, they’ll be more likely to purchase from you.
  • Display ads: Display ads on Google or Facebook are another excellent option for reminder advertising. You can create a reminder ad that can help reinforce brand awareness.
  • Content: One of the best ways to keep your brand in your audience’s mind is to produce content on your website and social media. If someone sees your posts on social media or on your blog, they’ll have you in their mind when it’s time to purchase.

Now that we know more about reminder advertising, let’s look at some examples.

Reminder Advertising Examples

1. Coca-Cola

Since Coca-Cola is an established brand, any ad that isn’t aimed at a new product launch serves as a reminder ad.

Take the ad below, for instance. – Read more

How Pandemics Reshape Advertising

My Post (6).pngAcross the globe, nearly everyone in the world has been impacted by this developing pandemic. In three months, this virus has spread to nearly every country and impacted businesses in a huge way. Many people are working from home (WFH) and with restaurants and stores being closed, consumers have changed their behavior. Some businesses have been negatively impacted, but others have seen growth during this time.

Last month, some brands experienced record revenue months while some have experienced significant loss. Some have not reported any negative impacts, yet. This situation is rapidly evolving, and we are making decisions by the day or week. Many brands have added special offers to their ads and website, but it is good to avoid messaging possibly perceived as taking advantage of a crisis.

One brand that experienced a record month sells a DIY product for your home. Due to the higher average order value of this product, I questioned if their revenue would suffer. They also offered an extended spring promotion for their customers. The reason for increased revenue could be as simple as customers are home with extra time on their hands.

During this time, do not assume you should reduce paid media budgets; let the data shape your decision. Another factor to consider is if you reduce your brand’s visibility too much it may have unintended consequences. It is likely business will not return to “normal” right away and we may see a “new normal”. Another factor to consider is healthy budgets can indicate having a healthy company.

You should also consider that your message matters. Consumer behaviors are changing as countries take measures to respond to this rapidly evolving situation. An ad that might work today could become socially inappropriate tomorrow. Geico received some backlash from Twitter users who were upset due to the perception company was not “social distancing”. – Read more