3 Essential Web Design Trends in 2019

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New year, new design trends!

While everyone is talking about big-picture trends such as designing for voice and virtual reality, there are more immediate design elements that you can see (and deploy) right now for a more on-trend website.

From websites without images above the scroll, to ecommerce that disguises itself as content, to bright blue everything, here’s a look at what’s trending this month.

1. No “Art” Above the Scroll

Have you noticed how many websites don’t have images or video above the scroll? This no “art” design style used to be reserved for coming soon or construction pages that didn’t have images, but it’s trending even for website designs with plenty of other imagery.

If you have a message or statement that is the most important thing for users to know right away, this can be an effective design technique. It works because there’s nothing else to see. (Unless the user refuses to read the words and abandons the design, which can be a risk with this style.)

Make the most of a no art design with beautiful typography and strong color choices.

These design elements can serve as art on their own and help add visual interest to the words on the screen.

Each of the three examples below does this in a slightly different way.

We Are Crowd uses a strong serif-sans serif typography pair on a bright colored background. Users are enticed to delve into the design thanks to an animated scroller on the homepage. The no “art” design actually alternates between image and non-image panels, showing users there is something to look at. – Read more

7 Factors to Consider Before Major Website Changes

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Changing your content management system, joining domains, or migrating to a new domain can result in dramatic ranking changes.

These are seven considerations for preserving or improving your rankings before attempting these changes.

1. Site Architecture

A major consideration is how the web pages are organized. The organization of the web pages is usually referred to as the site architecture or the taxonomy. The ideal is to have logical category page structure, with additional sub-categories as needed.

There are two considerations:

  1. Maintain current site architecture to avoid losing rankings
  2. Update a poor site architecture in order to improve rankings

Maintain Site Architecture

To avoid upsetting good rankings, try to maintain current site architecture. This means keeping the same URLs and categories. Those are the two main considerations, assuming that the web pages aren’t changing.

If you need to merge web pages, choose the most popular URL and redirect the old URLs to the new URL. – Read more

Content metrics you need to know

My Post (6).jpgIf you’re producing digital content for your website or social media, then you want to know whether it’s working or not! Here’s our run down of metrics that you should be keeping an eye on.

Why do you need to know about digital marketing metrics?

Unlike offline marketing such as adverts and flyers, digital marketing offers businesses a plethora of in-depth insights into how effective their marketing efforts really are. With every post, like, share, follow or comment data is created that you can use to extend your reach and increase engagement with your brand.

Whether you’re looking to grow your business through organic or paid digital marketing there are a number of key metrics that you really need to know. In this post we’ll be looking at metrics that you can access for free, either via your social channels or via Google Analytics, and because they’re free, there’s no excuse not to be using them!

Website and behaviour

This section looks at how people are behaving on your website. All the information that you need can be found in Google Analytics, if you don’t already have an account set up, make your way over there now and get it done.

Page views

The total number of views a single page has had for any given time period. It’s a pretty basic stat but useful all the same as you can measure/ compare how your pages rank against each other.

If you find a page that stands out as particularly high ranking, or indeed low ranking, it can be an indicator to have a look at what might be working well, or not so well.

Average page time

A measure of how engaging a page is. – Read More

Common SEO Mistakes (And How To Fix Them With Design)

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SEO is a complex matter and one that web designers and developers might feel is best left to copywriters and search professionals to handle.

That makes sense since many common SEO hacks revolve around the manipulation of content and the tagging of it for search.

Here’s the thing though: there are certain choices you make as a web designer that ultimately affect the search-friendliness of your website. Which means you should be involved in the diagnosis and repair of a website’s SEO mistakes. – Read more

How to Use Event Tracking to Significantly Improve Your Website

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Getting better results from your website starts with collecting the right data and understanding how to extract insights from it. Before you can improve performance, you need to know what users are getting up to on your website and measure how this aligns with your marketing objectives. Event tracking is one of the more advanced Google Analytics features that allows you to track specific user actions on your website – down to the very elements they’re clicking on. With these data insights, you can measure how effectively key parts of your page are performing and diagnose issues with more precision.

Here’s what you need to know about event tracking in Google Analytics.

What is event tracking in Google Analytics?

Event tracking is a Google Analytics tool that can be used to measure user actions on your website. More specifically, it allows you to track every time a user clicks on a specific element; a link, a buy button, the play button on your video, etc. Or, you can also use event tracking to measure how far a user scrolls down the page, to understand how they’re engaging with your content.

This means you can track just about every action people are taking on your website, measure performance against highly-specific metrics and KPIs (e.g. video views, PDF downloads, etc) and test new variations against the data that matters most.

Essentially, event tracking takes off the blindfold and allows you to see what users are really doing on your site. – Read more

 

Google Launches New Tool That Grades A Site’s SEO Implementation

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Google has launched a new tool that measures many aspects of a website, including how well it follows SEO best practices.

The new tool is currently in open beta and available at web.dev.

Web.dev is designed to help developers and site owners apply modern web capabilities by providing analysis and recommendations.

Google says this tool is the culmination of 10+ years learning about user needs.

In an effort to help site owners provide the best possible experience for users, web.dev has audits for SEO, performance, accessibility, and more.

The tool looks for: – Read More

How to Optimize Your Website for Voice Search

My Post502.jpgThe number of spoken web searches is growing by leaps and bounds. Recent data from Google shows that about one in five searches are voice-driven.

Come 2020, as many as 50% of searches will be conducted via voice, a ComScore study predicts. Naturally, then, your site should be optimized for voice search. These five tips can help make it so.

1. Improve Your Page Load Speed. Google gives special priority in voice searches to sites that load quickly, so make sure your site’s download speed is fast. A service like developers.google.com/speed/pagespeed/insights/ can help with load time insights and improvement.

2. Answer Questions With Content. Voice searches often come in the form of natural language questions. That means it’s important to populate your site with info that answers key questions prospects might ask in searching for the products and services you provide. Online services like AnswerThePublic.com can help you develop insights into natural phrases people might use in asking questions related to your business. Also helpful: Google Analytics can reveal keywords people use to locate you online. – Read More

3 Big Reasons Why You Must Audit Your Internal Links

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Link acquisition has been all the rage in SEO for as long as most of us can remember.

What is interesting is the lack of attention paid to internal linking vs. inbound linking.

Yes, inbound links are important for driving referrals and portraying brand and domain authority to search engines.

But your internal links serve three fundamental functions on your website.

Let’s dig into these three areas.

Read on to learn how to understand, optimize, and manage your website internal linking structure.

1. Internal Links Portray Page Importance to Search Engines

A healthy exercise for any organization is to sit down and list the role of the website.

Answer these two important questions:

  • What do you want each user to do when they visit?
  • What is most important about your site?

The answers will vary, but may sometimes be identical.

For example, we want every user to see what products and services we provide.

We also feel that this is our most valuable content. That for which is most important to us should also be of SEO focus as well considering that we want this content to rank well. – Read more

 

5 Tips for Better Website Navigation

My Post405.jpgAs a business, your website should be informative, and the key to a seamless user experience lies in the navigation.

Any time a user visits a website, they want and expect all content to be clear and concise. Your navigation is the map—and therefore digital portal—between the visitor and what you have to offer.

According to Silverback Strategies, “A key step to staying ahead of competitors is ensuring that your company makes a great first impression, and your website is often the first encounter consumers have with your brand.” Unfortunately, not everyone puts the right amount of time and effort into crafting a navigation that works. With that in mind, these seven tips will help you create a better website navigation that users will appreciate and understand.

1) Plan Your Navigation Early

It’s not uncommon to be eager when creating a website and to simply start adding pages in your website host dashboard. However, this can easily lead to an ill-planned navigation menu, and you can do much better by prepping your pages ahead of time. When you prepare your navigation menu ahead of time, this is called a “sitemap”—and just as it sounds, it’s a map of your website. There are several ways you can do this. Start off by drafting a map via pen and paper to help get your ideas out. Then, begin creating it in something as simple as a Google doc – Read more

Recovering SEO traffic and rankings after a website redesign

My Post142.jpgAfter a review to confirm a drop in traffic, there are some typical problems (like redirects, missing pages and protocol and domain issues) that can be fixed to get your SEO back on track.

When building a new website, retaining and improving your SEO and organic traffic should be a key design goal. This requires a clear understanding of how SEO and website design work together and careful planning for the site migration. If everything is done correctly, you should retain (and improve) rankings and traffic.

Unfortunately, in the real world, this is often not what happens. The site launches. Organic traffic tanks. And then panic sets in. Unfortunately, I get a call like this every week. Most often from small business owners where the loss of organic traffic means that leads or sales slow down and put the business at risk.

It is important to realize that all is not lost and in the majority of cases, there are a few usual suspects to blame for the loss of traffic. In this article, I cover how to diagnose and recover traffic and rankings when a website design goes wrong.

Step 1 – Gathering Information
We don’t need a lot here but in an ideal world we would want the following:

  • Google Analytics
  • Google Search Console
  • Date of launch
  • Website URL
  • Historic or alternative URLs
  • Historic keyword rankings (if available)

Step 2 – Confirmation Read More