Designing Mobile Websites For Voice Search

My Post (58).jpgIn January 2018 alone, consumers conducted over 1 billion voice searches. By 2020, it’s estimated that 30% of all online searches will take place without the use of a screen.

Needless to say, voice search is set to make serious waves in the not-so-distant future.

As more users seek out the convenience of using their voice to search online, you have to consider how this will impact mobile websites.

As of now, your main concern doesn’t need to be with designing a website that literally talks back to visitors. We have microinteractions and conversational UIs that can help with that. Instead, what you should do is consider the relationship between voice users and search.

Here are some things to think about as you approach the design of mobile websites in 2019 and beyond:

1. Place Answers to Common Queries at the Top

According to a Bright Local survey from 2018, 28% of voice users will call a business immediately after finding them in search.

So, while it’s important to have a well-designed website that appeals to local shoppers or customers, it’s just as important to get them the information they need right away. And when someone is using their phone and their voice to look up a website, chances are good they’re looking for a shortcut to get in touch.

But making a call isn’t the only kind of action a voice user might want to take in this instance. Think of other ways in which they’d want to engage with your client’s website or business:

  • To get the brick-and-mortar store’s hours of operation;
  • To find a live chat or support portal for help with a product or service;
  • To make a reservation or appointment;
  • To get information about current sales or free shipping offers.

Google/Peerless Insights provide some insights into the types of information most commonly sought out by voice users in search: – Read more

An in-depth look at the importance of bounce rate

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A good user experience results in a low bounce rate. Here is an in-depth look at the bounce rate and what companies can do to reduce theirs.

Bounce rate is a metric that helps determine a webpage’s strength. Bounce rate is shown in a number of different Google Analytics reports and is often used by webmasters to determine whether the content of a page satisfies the intent of the user.

Primarily, companies want their website to have low bounce rates. A good user experience results in a low bounce rate. Here is an in-depth look at the bounce rate and what companies can do to reduce theirs.

Bounces Kill Search Ranking
You may have spent a lot of time and money ranking your web site with national SEO techniques but if users click on your listing on Google and then bounce back to Google that clearly shows a search engine that you should not rank for a query.

User engagement and behavior on a site can increase bounce rates and drop ranking very quickly. Google has the goal of returning the best possible search results possible to fulfill queries. Happy search users will continue using their search engine. But bounces show search engines that a query was not solved or that a site returned a poor user experience.

What Is Bounce Rate
A bounce rate is a number that shows the number of users that landed on a particular website, but left the page without interacting on it. Companies that use Google Analytics on their websites have access to their bounce rate. The analytics keep track of every option performed on a page.

However, when the server only receives one request from the page, that means that the user left the page without doing anything. The complete formula used to find the bounce rate involves all single page sessions being divided by the total number of sessions. Keep in mind that the bounce rate is only calculated for landing pages. – Read more

 

SEO vs PPC: How to Choose What’s Best For Your Business

My Post (55).jpgAs a business owner are you often confused about choosing the right online marketing channel?

Most businesses struggle with scanty resources. Marketing seems like that perpetual back pain. It’s hard to know which platform will help get the best ROI.

Considering the quantum of online search activity, SEO and PPC are two essential marketing strategies.

The number of daily searches on Google is a whopping 3.5 billion equating 1.2 trillion every year! – Smart Insights

Which one activity to focus on while the business is still small? It’s critical to first understand the difference between these two most popular approaches.

Let’s dive into the fundamental difference:

Search Engine Optimization
SEO is an organic or non-paid form of marketing that helps build site authority including a host of other benefits.

61% of marketers say improving SEO and growing their organic presence is their top inbound marketing priority. – (HubSpot, 2017)

Many business owners and marketers have a myth that SEO is a quick ranking hack. The truth is that SEO requires you to invest considerable time, effort, and resources. Here are some of the key SEO activities:

  1. Creating a well-structured website
  2. Resolving technical issues on the site
  3. Performing keyword research
  4. Creating an audience persona
  5. Creating content that matches user intent
  6. Acquiring quality backlinks

Search engines provide online searchers with the best possible solution to their queries. Publishers who create audience-centric content out-do others and rank on search result pages. SEO is a race to provide the best answers to web searchers. – Read more

Google Ads – Should I Incorporate Them in My Marketing Strategy?

My Post (54).jpgYou’ve probably searched for a product using Google Search and immediately saw a high-ranking result with a small label reading “Ad.”

It’s there for a reason — someone paid the popular search for it. Taking advantage of these types of ads may be useful for your marketing strategy, but properly implementing them is a little more complicated than you might think.

Last year, Google rebranded its advertising platform from Adwords to Google Ads, as it combined advertising within its Search, Display, YouTube, Google Play and Google Maps products into one division of its advertising suite. Now, this doesn’t affect how you would advertise on the platform, but it does help resolve any confusion about which platform to use if you are thinking about incorporating Google ads in your strategy.

If you aren’t familiar with Google Search and Display advertising specifically, you might be asking the questions, “What do they look like? Where do they appear? How do they work? How much do they cost?” – Read more

How AdWords Attribution Can Make Your Marketing Budget More Efficient

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What is AdWords attribution I hear you ask? Well, essentially AdWords attribution can be understood as which of your AdWords campaigns is responsible for your conversions.

The session was hosted by Patrick & Eustace who are attribution experts within Google’s Dublin HQ. They started by giving us an overview of what attribution is and why it is important.

Did you know that more than half of web traffic is now concentrated through mobile devices typically on smartphones? As we are sure you are aware, however, conversions are typically lower on smartphones, well the reason for this may not simply be down to what you would typically assume about mobile devices.

Users will regularly go through on average five interactions before they take the final purchasing decision – these means that users don’t only not convert because of your mobile layout, but can also be down to users being at a different stage on the customer journey, perhaps users came to your landing page while in the research stage for example. 75% of adults online will start an activity on one device but finish on another. This means your traditional attribution to conversions model may be out of date – maybe you are just tracking conversion down to the last campaign a user interacts with as opposed to the journey in its totality, this is wrong and may be leading to wasted marketing spend!

This is where AdWords attribution comes into play, there are a variety of options in terms of how you attribute your conversions that can be used to give a clearer picture and using “ last click” or “first click” attribution is to be discouraged if you want to identify which campaign is contributing what value to your final conversions. – Read more

Tips on testing responsive search ads

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Are the additional characters or RSAs generating better results or more problems?

Have you been testing Google’s responsive search ads, but are still not sure what to make of them? You’re not alone.

Cara deBeer, paid search director at Catalyst, and Brad Geddes, co-founder of Adalysis, discussed what they’ve seen so far from testing responsive search ads (RSAs) against enhanced text ads (ETAs) in a session at SMX West last week.

In her presentation, deBeer discussed some of the limitations of RSAs (namely detailed reporting) and ways to evaluate how your RSAs are really doing. Looking at case studies from client accounts, deBeer showed test results at the aggregated account level that seemed to indicate mixed results — lower click-through rates (CTR), higher conversion rates (CVR) — for RSAs compared to ETAs. Looking at various segments, however, the data looked a bit different.

Label and segment for deeper insights

“We need to dig into various segments to see areas for opportunity, even if it looks like RSAs aren’t doing well,” said deBeer.

She showed results segmented by device, match type, brand and non-brand, at the product level by geographic market to identify pockets of insights.

Her parting advice was, “Everyone should test RSAs, but not everyone should test them all the time.”

If you’re in a regulated area like pharma or need to tightly control your ad copy, RSAs are not for you. But, deBeer said, if you want to take advantage of the additional real estate of RSAs, are able to label the different ad formats for analysis and have a handful of top, high volume ad groups that will allow you to use existing reporting and be able to segment your results, then she recommends testing RSAs.

Geddes presented data looking across thousands of accounts. This aggregated data suggested using RSAs “if you want high CTRs on broad matched keywords and aren’t conversion focused” and to use ETAs “if you are conversion focused.” On the whole, Geddes says they see RSAs driving higher CTR and lower CVR than enhanced text ads. In other words, RSA can function well for driving upper-funnel traffic. – Read more

YouTube SEO: 5 Hacks for Quicker, Better YouTube Keyword Research

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Proper YouTube keyword research is the backbone of a good YouTube SEO strategy.

Why? Because finding the right YouTube keywords could mean the difference between your ideal shopper catching your content, or your content being a complete traffic dead-zone.

The first thing you want to do before getting your research on is to do a keyword audit of your YouTube content and channel. This means looking at the following metrics:

  • Google Analytics traffic sources, which point to search volumes
  • Video view times, which could show you where the relevance of keywords to video content is lacking
  • Playback locations, which show demographic opportunities
  • Real-Time Reports, which show your estimated views in real-time
  • Audience retention, which could point to the relevancy of your keywords
  • Shares, likes, dislikes, comments and subscriber rates, which give you an idea of your content (and keyword) engagement

Once you know where you stand, you will know which content needs a keyword revamp. This will also help shape your YouTube keyword strategy by giving you insights into what is or isn’t working – a strategy you can duplicate in terms of keywords in the future. The first step to optimizing your channel and/or content keywords is doing proper research, which doesn’t need to be a tedious affair.

So, how do you streamline your YouTube keyword research so that you’re not only finding better keywords but finding them in a quicker, more efficient way? With these five hacks, of course!

Let’s jump straight in.

1. Take Advantage of YouTube Auto-Complete
YouTube’s auto-complete is a gold mine of important long-tail keywords in your niche. And we know just how critical long-tail keywords are to establishing rank in competitive niches and driving more targeted potential shoppers.

YouTube’s auto-complete will help you find popular YouTube search phrases that you may not have thought of for your main store keywords. It can also point to popular content that your shoppers could be interested in seeing – therefore giving you a host of new video marketing ideas, as well as possible new popular products. – Read more

Top 10 User Engagement KPIs to Measure

My Post (51).jpgIn today’s low-attention economy, site engagement can be considered an indicator of your website’s success.

Content engagement metrics are important because they show how your content strategy aligns with user interest.

Furthermore, customer engagement is related with overall profitability, as engaged users are more likely to buy, become repeat customers, and share the product/service with other people.

Before you decide on the specific user engagement metrics you want to track, you have to determine which ones make the most sense for your business.

Here are some of the most common (and most important) user engagement metrics.

1. Pageviews

What are Pageviews?

Pageviews, sessions, and users are the most common metrics used to indicate traffic on your website. Pageviews are the most basic of all user engagement metrics, measuring an instance of a user visiting a particular page on your website.

Measuring pageviews can help you to understand how often people visit your website. A higher number can be assumed to be an indicator of interest and/or good SEO practices, since search engines are often the biggest drivers of traffic to websites.

Conversely, pageviews can also indicate that people are poking around your website because they can’t find anything.

Pageviews show traffic but without tying in the context of other related metrics, they can’t help you to fully understand the meaning behind these numbers. – Read more

The Best Landing Page Designs to Inspire Your Next Layout

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Post originally published on Unbounce.com

Does beauty matter? Well, when it comes to landing page design, it can definitely influence how your offer is perceived. Ultimately, if your landing pages don’t look good—or follow some best-practices—your conversions can suffer.

Landing pages that are well designed often convert better than those that aren’t, and the difference can be dramatic. Done right, design should support the text on your page and work with all other elements to prompt visitors to take action.

But first: What are some design best practices?

Below we’ve rounded up tons of examples of amazing landing page design from Unbounce customers. But before we share them, let’s review some of the characteristics we typically see on great pages:

They’re Super Focused

A good landing page has only one objective: prompting visitors to do the one action you want them to do and convert. This is why many landing pages don’t have menus or a ton of external links—you want your visitor to complete the call to action, not navigate away or get distracted.

They Keep Scrolling to a Minimum

It can be great to include additional information about your offer on a page, but visitors should have everything they need—including the CTA button—without scrolling for days. While long-form landing pages can convert in the case of complex offers, consider using lightboxes to showcase extra info instead of adding tons of page sections. – Read more

Now your Google text ads can show on YouTube search results, too

My Post (43).jpgGoogle says early tests have shown similar performance results for text ads on YouTube and Google Search.

  • SAN JOSE — With the introductions of features such as location extensions and calls-to-action in TrueView for Action Ads, YouTube ads have been gaining performance elements native to traditional Search advertising. Taking this a step further, YouTube announced Wednesday at SMX West in San Jose that Search text ads can now extend onto YouTube.

What is changing? Google is incorporating YouTube into its Search Partners network.

What does this mean? Now, when Search text ad campaigns are opted-into Search Partners, your text ads may appear on YouTube search results pages when users search for keywords relevant to your campaign on the video platform — but solely on mobile. At this point, text ads will only appear in the mobile search feed on YouTube. – Read more