10 Google Analytics Ecommerce Metrics You Should Be Tracking

My Post (85)Ecommerce sites capitalize on the convenience of online shopping, but they also face stiff competition in a crowded marketplace.

That means if you are an online retailer, your website should be fully optimized, and your marketing channels well-curated in order to increase the likelihood of a customer completing the sale. So how do you know what on your website is working well and what could use some TLC? That’s what Google Analytics ecommerce tracking is for.

Google Analytics allows online retailers to set up ecommerce tracking by adding tracking codes to the relevant pages on the website. This step can be completed in-house if your team has coding knowledge, or outsourced to your web developer. At Pacific54, setting up, auditing, and optimizing Google Analytics and tracking tags is a top priority when launching or optimizing marketing campaigns for our clients.

After enabling Google Analytics ecommerce tracking, you can use the dashboard to learn more about audience behavior, sales revenue, and the effectiveness of your marketing campaigns. With so much information at your fingertips, it can be hard to sort out exactly which metrics should be your focus. – Read more

The Must-Have Elements of a Successful SEO Strategy

My Post (84).pngEvery business owner wants to remain relevant and boost revenue.

Creating a powerful SEO strategy can help them to achieve their goals. Google has over 200 ranking factors and this can be overwhelming for an individual with little or no knowledge of how SEO works.

An SEO strategy usually comprises of off-page and on-page techniques, employed to improve your website’s visibility. They play a major role in increasing ranking on SERP in order to beat the competition.

The right blend of both factors is essential for a successful strategy. Keep these suggestions in mind as you develop a new SEO plan or revamp the existing one for your brand.

Off-Page SEO

Social Media
Social media is a powerful element in every successful SEO strategy. It allows brands to interact with their users, provide latest information about a particular product, and more. Special targets can be achieved via social media by organizing campaigns and sharing valuable content that contains relevant keywords.

Backlinks
High-quality links are non-negotiable if you want your brand to have a strong online presence. The importance of creating amazing content can’t be underscored as it influences nearly every aspect of digital marketing.

You are bound to attract authority sites and prospective customers if you remain consistent. Consider approaching similar businesses to make the link building process mutually beneficial. Make sure that you schedule a site crawl to check for broken links. The important thing is to focus on White Label SEO tactics.

Online Directories
Having a strong presence in online directories is another important element of a successful SEO strategy. Gathering real reviews about your website from users can help new customers to check out your site. In case there are negative reviews, look into their queries and provide a lasting solution.

It’s now common for brands to use SEO for reputation management and change how online visitors perceive their brands. Set the record straight and convince customers who have lost interest in your business to give it another try. – Read more

Is voice over-hyped? A new survey suggests lower adoption than previously thought

My Post (83).pngiPhones dominate usage, despite aggressive promotion of the Google Assistant.

A popular Bill Gates quotation reads, “Most people overestimate what they can do in one year and underestimate what they can do in ten years.” That’s often invoked to suggest new technologies don’t change things as quickly as expected but will have a longer-term impact. Such is the case with voice and virtual assistants.

A decade ago we used to say “search is the universal interface.” Slowly, voice is supplanting it — emphasis on the word slowly. Despite the hype around voice and virtual assistants, which I have contributed to, adoption is seemingly not happening as quickly as expected. A new report from SUMO Heavy underscores this idea.

About 30% are active users. The survey of just over 1,000 U.S. adults found that nearly half (46%) of respondents never use virtual assistants, emphasis on “never.” Another group (19%) use virtual assistants “rarely” (less than monthly). These are effectively non-users. Together these two groups represent 65% of the audience, while 29% (daily and weekly) is the active user base.

An earlier consumer survey from Uberall (April, 2019) discovered that 52% of respondents “never” use voice search. This is consistent with the SUMO Heavy findings.

Majority of usage happening on smartphones. It comes as no surprise that the bulk of voice usage is happening on smartphones, which have the most distribution of the various devices that feature virtual assistants. It’s interesting to note, in the graphic below, that there’s a fair amount of usage on the desktop (15%), which may be Cortana on Windows PCs, as well as in-car systems (11%). – Read more

A quick and easy guide to understanding search intent for SEO

My Post (81).pngSpend time researching “Know,” Do” and “Go” queries so you can create content that puts you in front of the consumer at all stages of their purchasing cycle.

In 2011, Google coined the phrase Zero Moment of Truth. They recognized how consumer behavior was changing in the online world.

The Zero Moment of Truth references the point in a buying cycle when the user is researching a product.

It’s the moment between the stimulus that makes you aware of a product (like an advert) and the First Moment of Truth (coined by AG Lafley) – the moment the user interacts with a brand just before making the purchasing decision.

In 2019, you need to make sure that your business and website are in front of the users at the time that they are researching the products you sell. Your brand needs to be at the forefront of their minds when they are ready to press the “Buy Now” or “Add to Cart” button.

But how do you go about finding out what kind of content you need to produce to appear at the different stages of the buying cycle?

This is where search intent comes in.

What is search intent for SEO?

First coined by Andrei Broder back in 2002 [pdf] (interestingly an Altavista employee and not a Google one), search intent is crucial for a successful SEO campaign.

Andrei says search intent can be broken down into three distinct types:

  • Informational Searches
  • Transactional Searches
  • Navigational Searches

So how does that work for SEO?

Let’s say we are doing SEO for a fictional e-commerce store that sells appliances. We can use this to show how the three different types of search intent work. – Read more

3 metrics small businesses should track to measure SEO success

My Post (79).pngSmall businesses need time and context to evaluate traffic retention, quality backlinks and conversion rates.

Small business owners increasingly understand that website success depends on developing and implementing an SEO strategy.

More than one-third (36%) of small businesses already have an SEO strategy, and an additional 23% plan to develop one in 2019, according to a recent Clutch survey.

While many small business owners understand they need an SEO strategy, many of them struggle to create one that is effective and comprehensive.

To develop and maintain an effective long-term SEO strategy, small business owners need to know the best ways to measure their SEO success.

To understand if your SEO strategy is working, you need to measure efforts that provide context about how your SEO impacts your business. Three metrics, in particular, are useful:

  1. Traffic retention
  2. Backlink quality
  3. Conversion rate

How small businesses currently measure SEO success

Currently, small businesses rely on traffic as the primary barometer of SEO success. – Read more

How to Segment and Track Your Audience With Google Analytics

My Post (67).pngWe’re often told that in today’s world data is king.

While there’s certainly truth to that statement, sometimes having too much information can be as bad as not having enough. In fact, too much data can blind easily us to truly important insights.

Over a third of marketers suffer from data overload.

That is, they know more about their customers than they know what to do with. This creates a whole host of problems. It’s inefficient. It makes it hard to know if you’re making the right decisions. It’s also just downright stressful.

To an extent, this problem is facilitated by the tools we use to analyze customer data. The problem isn’t with the tools themselves per se. Rather, we have the power to drill so deeply into our customers that it’s hard to know when to stop.

Take Google Analytics.

It’s the most popular analytics suite there is. There are also a host of Analytics tools that the platform supports.

From local bakery owners to behavioral marketing gurus at blue-chip companies, most people use Google Analytics to understand what is happening on their website. Yet how they use the tool varies immensely.

In reality, a lot of businesses don’t get further than a look at the number of site visitors or time on site. While these metrics are important, there is a reason that experienced marketers consider them to be vanity metrics. What companies with a limited budget and a business to run really need is a little bit of behavioral marketing know-how.

This means having a concrete strategy for segmenting and tracking your customers.

A Crash Course in Segmentation

Everyone likes to think that they’re a unique individual. In reality, this isn’t exactly the case. At the very least, it’s not so very difficult to group your customers into broad categories, otherwise known as audience segments. How you segment your audience will be based on certain indicators.

These come in two flavors static and dynamic.

Static indicators are things which don’t really change, at least not often. These are your audiences innate characteristics. The main examples are things like age, location, gender, income bracket and level of education. These are all available in Google Analytics by default, so you don’t need any wizardry to split your audience this way. – Read more

How To Track Phone Calls From Your Google Ad Campaigns

My Post (66).pngGoogle is very good at tracking a lot of valuable information for a website, but a robust modern business includes channels beyond a simple web score.

A good sales funnel includes other means of contact, up to and including phone calls.

How do you know where those calls come from? Asking your sales team to ask potential customers where they found your phone number could be needlessly distracting, and maintaining different phone numbers for different marketing channels gets expensive. Imagine trying to track different phone numbers for different PPC ad variations.

Thankfully, Google Ads includes call tracking, once you configure it. It’s actually quite simple in its execution. You have a phone number, either in your ads directly or on your website, tagged with a Google call extension. When a customer views your ads — or clicks through them to your website — the phone number they see is a Google forwarding number. When the user calls this number, their information is tracked and their call is forwarded to your business number, to be answered by your sales team.

There are two different ways to set up Google call tracking. One applies to your website and works when users click through Google Ads. The other applies directly to Google Ads, where the goal conversion is a phone call. – Read more

Starting July 1, all new sites will be indexed using Google’s mobile-first indexing

My Post (55).pngGoogle to default to mobile-first indexing for new sites. Be sure to build web sites that work well on mobile.

Google has announced that all new websites “previously unknown to Google Search” will be indexed using mobile-first indexing starting on July 1. Older web sites that are still not being indexed using mobile-first indexing will not be switched yet to mobile-first indexing on July 1st but be moved when those web sites are ready to be moved to mobile-first indexing.

Google’s statement. Google wrote “mobile-first indexing will be enabled by default for all new, previously unknown to Google Search, websites starting July 1, 2019. It’s fantastic to see that new websites are now generally showing users – and search engines – the same content on both mobile and desktop devices.”

Only new sites. To be clear, only brand new sites Google is not yet aware of, will be indexed using mobile-first indexing by default. Other sites that have already moved over to mobile-first indexing will also continue to be indexed using mobile-first indexing. But older sites not yet migrated will continue to be indexed the old-fashion way, desktop-first indexing, until those sites are ready.

“For older websites, we’ll continue monitoring and evaluating pages for their readiness for mobile first indexing, and will notify them through Search Console once they’re seen as being ready,” the company said.

No notifications. Unlike old web sites that get notifications when they are moved over, Google won’t send notifications to new web sites because that will be the default state. “Since the default state for new websites will be mobile-first indexing, there’s no need to send a notification,” Google said.

What is mobile-first indexing? Mobile-first indexing is simply how Google crawls and indexes the web. Instead of looking at the desktop version of the page, Google looks at the mobile version of the page. In more simple terms, Google is crawling and indexing your web page based on how it renders on a mobile phone versus a desktop computer. Now over 50% of what Google indexes is indexed over mobile-first indexing. – Read more

Google is Adding Favicons to All Search Results

My Post (54).pngGoogle will soon roll out a new look for search results which includes favicons in SERPs.

The website name and its favicon will appear at the top of the results card, as shown in the image above.

“With this new design, a website’s branding can be front and center, helping you better understand where the information is coming from and what pages have what you’re looking for.”

Google says this new look is helpful to searchers as they can more easily scan the page of results and decide which source to get their information from.

This change will also affect how ads are displayed. A black ‘Ad’ label replaces the green label, which is displayed at the top of the card along with a URL. – Read more

The Extended SEO Checklist: Four Steps To Help You Outshine Your Competitors

My Post (51).pngWhen you’re executing a digital marketing strategy, there’s so much you need to keep track of.

Social media campaigns, email marketing campaigns, paid social — it can all overshadow the importance of having an effective SEO strategy.  But make no mistake: Your relationship with Google (and your audience) depends on how well you’ve followed this SEO checklist.

To put it in simple terms, SEO is the foundation of your marketing efforts. If you put the time in now, you’ll notice that it’s significantly easier for audiences to find your content and brand. Remember, you’re not the only business in town. If you want to attract and convert consumers like no one else can, you must outshine your competitors in every aspect of marketing.

In my last piece, I shared six keys to a successful SEO strategy. With that in mind, let’s take a closer look at the SEO principles that your competitors aren’t paying enough attention to today.

1. Conduct competitor analysis properly.

When I talk about “researching” and “setting goals” while establishing an SEO strategy, it’s important to note that these things don’t exist in a vacuum. You’re not just researching keywords and figuring out what kinds of blog posts to write based on Google Analytics data. You’re not setting arbitrary, vague goals (even if this is your first business).

Your strategy needs to have a basis in something. And if you’re looking for a great starting point, look no further than your industry competitors. Let’s be honest: You’ve probably already looked at some of their content. It’s natural to wonder what your competitors have to offer. I’m talking about going a step beyond that.

Don’t just scan headlines. The goal is to take an in-depth look at what makes their websites tick. Should you be analyzing their writing and determining how their content falls short? Yes, of course. But you should also make observations about their websites and UI. How long do certain pages take to load? Does it feel intuitive when you navigate their websites? Are there too many images? Not enough?

Start to paint a picture of their SEO shortcomings, and determine how your website can outshine theirs.

2. Understand the power of reviews.

I believe that this is by far one of the most criminally underrated SEO principles in the digital marketing landscape. Let’s ignore the fact that online reviews are a fantastic way to show potential consumers how serious you are about providing the best customer experience possible. In fact, we’re not going to discuss how important online reviews are when you’re trying to become an online authority.

For now, let’s just focus on the value that reviews offer if you’re looking to be acknowledged by Google. While there are plenty of factors that impact search rankings, online customer reviews are typically a strong signal to search engines that communicate authenticity and authority.

Reviews matter, plain and simple. If it matters to Google and it matters to consumers, it should matter to you. So, reach out to customers and ask them to leave reviews and testimonials after they buy your product. – Read more