How to Optimize Your PPC Campaign For SaaS Products

How to Optimize Your PPC Campaign For SaaS Products

The usage of SaaS products has exponentially skyrocketed over the years. So much so that companies have reportedly spent over $343 k on an average on SaaS products every year.

The rapid growth is a result of companies collaborating with PPC or the Profit per Click marketing style. While this may be great news, it brought about a massive increase in competition in the SaaS product market. This, in turn, leads to the PPC SaaS campaigns. 

Before jumping into the possible reasons for your PPC campaign for SaaS products failing, let’s get an understanding of what baselines should be kept in mind to keep a check on your performance. 

How to Incorporate a Primary Baseline to Measure Your SaaS Product PPC Performance?

You must establish a standard for measuring the performance before starting work on a SaaS business through PPC. You must settle down on a limited number of these baselines for measurement of performance! Why? Because it is difficult to follow too many of these metrics, this could lead to you focusing on multiple trending metrics instead of those that are perfect for your campaign.  

Hence, you must limit yourself. The top three best essential baselines to measure your SaaS product PPC performances are as mentioned! 

 Calculating Total Ad Budget

Before you start raking in customers and start making money, you will have to think about maintaining a steady cash flow. To ensure your business is stable, you must calculate the money you will be investing! 

You can calculate the total Ad budget by using the formula mentioned below. 

 The target number of closed deals per month x Target CAC or the amount you will be paying for each customer 

For example – If your targeted CAC is $2000 and you have managed to close two deals in the month, add these numbers to the formula, and you will get your total ad budget to be $4000. 

It is a critical baseline measurement to keep track of your recurring costs, whether you’re adding to them or losing them. 

 Calculating Number of Clicks Needed

Calculating the number of clicks or the click rate helps you know the frequency with which people are seeing and clicking on your SaaS PPC advertisement. A higher number of clicks is a clear indication of your PPC advertisement doing good. 

Following the formula mentioned below, you will find out how many clicks you are garnering. 

Clicks required- Demos required per month/ Visitors to demo conversion rate. 

Let’s put this formula into action! Say your website visitor to demo conversion rate is about 5%; this is your denominator for the clicks you need. Now let’s calculate the number of demos required per month. 

All you will have to do is divide the total deals you closed in the month ( for this equation, it would be 2) by the demo conversion rate. Let’s assume your demo conversion rate is 10%. You would get 20 and that is the number of demos you’ll require per month.

How many clicks does that make? Now divide these 20 demos per month by 5%. Your result would be- 400 clicks.  – Read more

Are High Shipping Prices Killing Your Ecommerce Sales?

My Post - 2020-03-24T143432.974.pngAs an account manager, I frequently analyze platforms and Google analytics. A bulk of my time is measuring performance, identifying wasteful spend, and looking for ways to increase leads or revenue. Less of my time is spent navigating the clients website like their customers. Perhaps this is a mistake.

Are Website Errors Impacting Conversions?

Over the years, my investigation of poor campaign performance has led me to find issues on the website that were affecting performance. One time the cost-per-lead (CPL) spiked in one of my campaigns, and I discovered the lead form was broken. Another time a form option was removed and those campaign’s leads flatlined.

Another time I noticed a decrease in call conversions. The report showed more than 41 calls, but the call duration did not exceed 30 seconds which is the required length to be counted as conversions. After testing the phone number, the greeting stated the offices were closed. It turned out an employee left the company, and no one redirected the phones and instead all the calls went to voicemail.

Sometimes we forget campaigns can drive the right customers to the right pages, but then the website loses the conversion. The landing page experience is a key factor in the conversion performance for a campaign. If your form is too complex it can frustrate mobile searchers. If the checkout process is too confusing, your customers might abandon their cart.

Tip: Double check your conversion tracking, search impressions share lost to rank, and any potential negatives preventing your ads from showing.

Google Merchant Center Warnings

Recently, one of my clients received a policy violation warning from Google Merchant Center their shipping prices did not match on the website compared to what was in their feed. After receiving this notice, I spent time reviewing the shipping prices in Google Merchant Center versus their website.

If you are new to PPC or Shopping, the Google Merchant Center is a tool that gives you a place to upload and store products data for your website. This tool pushes the products into your Google Shopping campaign. Sometimes your product prices, availability, or shipping prices become outdated on the website. This may require something as simple as logging in and refreshing the feed. However, it may require updating information on the website or in merchant center to make sure they are the same.

Tip: Shipping and tax prices listed in Google Merchant Center can be higher than what is on your website without getting penalized. The prices listed on your website should never be higher than what is listed in your data feed. – Read more

6 Types of User Behavior to Track on Your Website & the Tools to Do It

My Post - 2020-01-20T170351.928.pngWe work hard in our roles whether in SEO, paid search, or other aspects of digital and broader marketing trying to get people to our websites.

Websites are focal points for our messaging and getting our audiences to take key actions that we can monetize.

While large brands and marketing firms often have roles and teams that are responsible for the performance of websites, once a visitor enters them through to the final goal or conversion, that’s not the reality for most of us.

Most of us have to rely on our own tools and abilities to monitor user behavior on our sites with the goal of finding ways to improve moving users through the funnel to ultimately get to our conversion goals.

Or, worse yet, we’re leaving that up to chance as we’re already overloaded working on driving organic and paid traffic to our sites to keep the top of the funnel full.

Regardless of where we find ourselves, there are distinct categories of user behavior and we can dig into and specific tools to make our lives easier working to evaluate and improve each of them.

1. User Experience

User experience (UX) is probably the broadest category of user behavior and it could be argued that all user behavior is impacted by it.

It can be difficult to track and measure and often requires collaboration between designers, developers, and marketers if you or your team don’t have a specific role for it.

Behavior to Track

  • In-page clicks & mouse movement
  • Scroll depth
  • User navigation patterns
  • Live visitors
  • Recordings
  • Site speed

How to Get the Data

There are great tools on the market that give us the depth and quality of information that Google Analytics lacks.

We can watch individual visitors live as they navigate through our sites or recordings of their sessions with tools like Lucky Orange, Crazy Egg, and Hotjar.

We also have the ability to review aggregated data and visualizations of how deep visitors scroll, where their mouse pointer goes on the screen, how much time they spend on pages, and much more.

There’s a lot to be gained in these third-party tools beyond what GA can provide and it is important to look at both together to get a complete picture of user experience.

What to Do with the Data

With in-page user experience data you can make decisions that will:

  • Help retain visitors on pages.
  • Ensure they see the content you want them to.
  • Learn how to improve navigation flow to nudge them along to the next page or call to action.

Understanding how users actually use the site versus how you planned or wanted them to is a critical aspect to know and interpret from the data you can collect in user experience tools.

2. Content Performance

Content is fuel for marketing.

It is the foundation and reason why someone comes to our sites.

It’s also what they engage with, whether they spend hours and dozens of visits to our site or if they are coming to a single landing page and converting.

Behavior to Track

  • Popularity
  • Sharing
  • Engagement
  • Bounces & Exits

How to Get the Data

Google Analytics is a great direct source of content performance data.

With it we can filter and track which pages are most popular, which search terms (if we have configured GA to see site search data) are being searched, frequency and repeat visits, and what content has the most bounces and exits.

By default, most of these metrics are tracked in GA and we simply have to drill down and filter our way to seeing each layer and meaningful data point.

What to Do with the Data

When we have data showing us what content is getting the most engagement within the site, how people are getting to the content, and what they are doing when they consume it and move to a next step, we can further shape and refine our content strategies.

This includes blog content and impacts the editorial calendar. It also can spell out changes for evergreen content about products or services.

Coupling the content data with the UX data noted previously, we can paint a picture of how we should format our content into sections, pages, sub-pages, and make it as consumable as possible.

3. Conversion Rate Optimization

Conversions are defined by us. They are what we want our site visitors to do.

Whether it is an ecommerce transaction, a lead form submission, or certain subsets of engagement goals, we are typically measuring performance toward a goal.

Optimizing the number of conversions per the number of visits is key to make sure the site is performing at as well as it could and should.

Additionally, the path leading immediately up to a conversion is important.

When we have prospects ready to inquire or buy, we need to get out of their way and make it easy to do. The steps directly leading to conversions have to be measured.

Behavior to Track

  • Funnel
  • Checkout process
  • Variable testing
  • Form testing

How to Get the Data

There are several great tools to help with CRO.

These range from Google Analytics to UX tools (e.g., Lucky Orange) to variable testing tools (e.g., Optimizely).

With these tools we can gain insight into how people go through our defined conversion funnels like checkout or form submission processes.

We can also perform variable testing and see how different forms, content, and pages perform.

There’s power in gaining insights into what form field causes users to bail from a conversion process or what page is tripping them up in checking out. – Read more