Google: Mobile Speed Should Be an Ongoing Priority

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Google encourages businesses not to think of mobile speed as a one-and-done fix. It should be an ongoing priority.

Mary Ellen Coe, president of Google Customer Solutions, penned an article outlining the reasons why mobile speed should be taken more seriously.

“While there are as many growth strategies as there are types of businesses, there’s one area where nearly every business has room to improve: the mobile web.”

Having a mobile presence is no longer enough. In order for businesses to grow, they need to continue delivering speedy mobile experiences.

Fifty-four percent of people say that as the load time for a brand’s mobile site increases, so does their frustration.

To that end, a one-second delay in mobile load times can impact conversion rates by up to twenty percent.

Conversely, a fast mobile experience can help attract and retain customers.

Milliseconds can earn millions, Coe says. No matter how fast a site is today, the will eventually degrade over time if it’s not an ongoing priority. – Read more

Voice gaining on mobile browser as top choice for smartphone-based search

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Since 2018, voice has become more users’ first choice for mobile search.

We increasingly are talking to our phones in public. That’s the top-line finding of a new studyfrom Stone Temple Consulting (now a part of Perficient Digital). In its third year, the survey polled 1,719 U.S. adults on “how they use voice, when they use voice, and why.”

In nearly every environment people are using voice more than in the past. In 2017 there were considerable inhibitions surrounding public voice usage; almost across the board that has changed. Usage is still highest, however, at home or alone (at the office).

Search in 6th place. Voice is used more often to initiate communication (calling, texting), get directions or play music than it is for most other online activities. In this survey, “online search” was cited by roughly 23 percent of respondents as an “application” they’ve controlled by voice. This figure is low compared with other surveys.

According to the findings, the group most inclined to use voice commands was married males, between 25 and 34 years old, making more than $100,000 per year, with post-college education. Survey respondents overall said they liked voice commands because of speed, accuracy and the absence of typing. Roughly 47 percent also liked the fact that the answer was read back to them by an assistant. – Read more

Tools to build a better mobile experience

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It’s been twelve years since the dawn of the mobile era—a span where we’ve witnessed what can seem like a lifetime’s worth of digital innovation and new platforms.

Apps. Voice-activated assistants. AR. VR. It’s an age of digital plenty, and one that can make it easy to forget a plain truth: the mobile web is still the most widely used platform.

Because mobile is where most people turn when they want to know, go, do or buy, it’s important to deliver the kind of mobile experience that people expect today: one that’s fast, engaging and doesn’t get in the way of what they want to accomplish. And because Google is deeply invested in the success of marketers and brands, we never stop looking for ways to develop and support new tools and innovations that can move the industry forward.

With this in mind, today we’re introducing two new updates: a top-to-bottom rebuild of Test My Site, and more availability and growth of Rich Communications Services (RCS) Business Messaging.

Test My Site

One of the mobile era’s clearest lessons has been that the foundation for any great mobile experience is a fast mobile experience. How important is a fast mobile experience? According to SOASTA’s The State of Online Retail Performance, a one-second delay in mobile load times can impact conversion rate by up to 20%. That’s why in 2016 we created Test My Site, a tool for businesses to check the speed of individual mobile pages and get a few recommended fixes.

But moving at the speed of mobile means making the adjustments needed to continuously improve.  – Read more

Google Ads Updates Mobile Speed Score for Landing Pages

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Google Ads has changed the way it calculates mobile speed score, which is located in the Landing Pages tab.

The mobile speed score algorithm has been updated to require fewer ad clicks in order to calculate a score.

This update will allow advertisers to see a mobile speed score for more of their pages.

Presumably, this change also means scores will be generated faster when launching ads that point to newly published landing pages.

Google was not specific as to how many ad clicks are now required to generate a mobile speed score. – Read more

Nearly 70% of Consumers Say Page Speed Impacts Their Purchasing Decisions

My Post (46).jpgA report on page speed revealed nearly 70% of consumers say a website’s loading time affects their willingness to buy.

Further, 81% of marketers are aware that page speed impacts their conversions, but the majority aren’t making it a priority.

About 73% of marketers think that improving page speed is either somewhat urgent or very urgent, although only 3% say improving page speed is their top priority in 2019.

This data is included in a 2019 report on page speed stats and trends from Unbounce, which is based on responses from 750 consumers and 395 marketers.

Most websites are too slow, according to the report, with the average page speed clocking in at 15 seconds.

That’s troublesome when you consider that half of visitors will leave if they’re forced to wait longer than 3 seconds. – Read more

Accelerated mobile pages: Are they worth it?

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An update on where Google’s AMP project stands today offers insight into whether it’s worth adopting for your own website right now.

Google’s mobile-first index has officially been unveiled and you may have received a notification from Google Search Console that some of your websites are officially being enrolled in the index.

The mobile first index takes precedence over Google’s traditional desktop index and will serve the most appropriate results based on the device being searched on.

This further incentivizes the need for webmasters to implement a fully responsive design that is personalized for users on any device.

Google has attempted to make this transition easier for webmasters by creating its open source initiative that leverages stripped down HTML files to create fast and mobile-friendly copies of webpages. These are referred to as Accelerated Mobile Pages (AMP), which are distinguished by a lightning bolt symbol in mobile search results. – read more

How mobile traffic data can open new doors for your business

My Post301.jpgWith more consumers coming online, especially in growing markets like India, it’s crucial to optimise your website for more engagement and sales from mobile visitors.

The internet has gone mobile-first.

If you have any doubts about that statement, get this: globally, 57 percent of all internet access takes place from mobile devices, according to data from StatCounter.

Closer to home in India, the figure goes up to a whopping 78 percent! Further, a large part of this audience accesses the web only through a mobile device. – Read More

How mobile search is driving today’s in-store shopping experience

My Post103.jpgDespite what you’ve heard, brick-and-mortar isn’t dead. In fact, 61% of shoppers would rather shop with brands that also have a physical location than ones that are online only. Because sometimes, you just need something now — right now. Nearly 80% of shoppers will go to the store to buy when they have an item they need or want immediately.

People may still shop in stores most often, but they’re searching on their smartphones beforehand to make sure it’s worth the trip. As we were reminded during the 2017 holiday shopping season, a great deal of shopping research is coming from mobile: 78% of holiday shoppers who visited a store turned to online search before going into a store. What are they asking for help with before they go? Here’s what we found.

Help inspire my purchase

Shoppers turn to search before heading to the store when they don’t have a product or brand in mind. Mobile searches for “__ brands” are rising, as in “sock brands” (+150%), “men’s watch brands” (+70%), “best purse brands” (+140%), “makeup brands” (+150%). They’re also looking for helpful recommendations on what to buy — searches for reviews on mobile have increased by more than 35% over the past two years.

Help plan my in-store trip

Research tells us that half of people who used search before shopping looked for details about the store itself, such as locations or proximity. Get this: in the past two years, we’ve seen over 150% growth in mobile searches for “__ near me now” (“food near me now,” “gas station near me now,” and “delivery near me open now”). In addition to queries for local businesses near them, people are relying on their phones to check store hours, directions, wait times, contact information, and increasingly, product availability. In fact, 40% of shoppers wish retailers would do a better job of sharing inventory information.

Help narrow down my purchase options

Once they’ve homed in on a few options, people search on mobile to help make a final decision. They’re researching a purchase they plan to make in stores or to find the best option for their needs. We know shoppers are on the hunt for the best deals. How so? Because 43% of those who used their phone in stores over the holidays to shop said they did so to look for deals or savings, and 52% of shoppers think getting deals on their smartphone while in stores is a shopping trend that is both cool and something they’d use. Even more, 50% of shoppers say they use online video while actually shopping in stores.

Making mobile count

With so many people relying on their smartphones before shopping in store, the need for strategic and informed product content has never been more essential. Omnichannel retail leaders must prioritize the mobile experience — it could mean the difference between customers coming into your store primed and ready to buy, or leaving frustrated and empty-handed. – Read more

5G is coming and will change digital advertising in more ways than you think

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4G brought about video streaming, app stores, programmatic auctions and an entry point into the world of virtual reality, augmented reality and artificial intelligence. With 5G, experts say advertisers and publishers should expect much more.

Imagine hopping in an autonomous vehicle and calling up Amazon Alexa to prep for dinner. A holographic display appears on your dashboard and directs you through the steps of a recipe, based on your diet preferences and meal history, as you drive to Whole Foods to pick up the ingredients, which are already being assembled robotically.

That is a (realistic) vision of the future with 5G, according to Scott Singer, managing director at consultancy DDG. Singer and other experts say 5G brings with it the ability to process and exchange more data at higher speeds, so advertisers and publishers can expect to see faster ad-load times on desktop and mobile and more connected devices.

Today, when a visitor to a website clicks a link, there is a slight delay before a server responds, resulting in milliseconds to seconds of nothing apparently happening. It’s an issue that causes visitors to click away from an article or site, and one reason behind the adoption of ad blockers, according to a study by the Interactive Advertising Bureau. But 5G will effectively eliminate that delay, said Jeremy Lockhorn, vp of experience strategy for mobile and emerging technology at agency SapientRazorfish, resulting in faster ad-load times and happier users. The FCC states that 5G is 1,000 times faster than 4G with 100 times less latency. Singer said he wouldn’t be surprised if the use of ad blockers begins to diminish because of webpages loading at quicker speeds. – Read more