How to Optimize Your PPC Campaign For SaaS Products

How to Optimize Your PPC Campaign For SaaS Products

The usage of SaaS products has exponentially skyrocketed over the years. So much so that companies have reportedly spent over $343 k on an average on SaaS products every year.

The rapid growth is a result of companies collaborating with PPC or the Profit per Click marketing style. While this may be great news, it brought about a massive increase in competition in the SaaS product market. This, in turn, leads to the PPC SaaS campaigns. 

Before jumping into the possible reasons for your PPC campaign for SaaS products failing, let’s get an understanding of what baselines should be kept in mind to keep a check on your performance. 

How to Incorporate a Primary Baseline to Measure Your SaaS Product PPC Performance?

You must establish a standard for measuring the performance before starting work on a SaaS business through PPC. You must settle down on a limited number of these baselines for measurement of performance! Why? Because it is difficult to follow too many of these metrics, this could lead to you focusing on multiple trending metrics instead of those that are perfect for your campaign.  

Hence, you must limit yourself. The top three best essential baselines to measure your SaaS product PPC performances are as mentioned! 

 Calculating Total Ad Budget

Before you start raking in customers and start making money, you will have to think about maintaining a steady cash flow. To ensure your business is stable, you must calculate the money you will be investing! 

You can calculate the total Ad budget by using the formula mentioned below. 

 The target number of closed deals per month x Target CAC or the amount you will be paying for each customer 

For example – If your targeted CAC is $2000 and you have managed to close two deals in the month, add these numbers to the formula, and you will get your total ad budget to be $4000. 

It is a critical baseline measurement to keep track of your recurring costs, whether you’re adding to them or losing them. 

 Calculating Number of Clicks Needed

Calculating the number of clicks or the click rate helps you know the frequency with which people are seeing and clicking on your SaaS PPC advertisement. A higher number of clicks is a clear indication of your PPC advertisement doing good. 

Following the formula mentioned below, you will find out how many clicks you are garnering. 

Clicks required- Demos required per month/ Visitors to demo conversion rate. 

Let’s put this formula into action! Say your website visitor to demo conversion rate is about 5%; this is your denominator for the clicks you need. Now let’s calculate the number of demos required per month. 

All you will have to do is divide the total deals you closed in the month ( for this equation, it would be 2) by the demo conversion rate. Let’s assume your demo conversion rate is 10%. You would get 20 and that is the number of demos you’ll require per month.

How many clicks does that make? Now divide these 20 demos per month by 5%. Your result would be- 400 clicks.  – Read more

Google Ads New & Improved Match Types. Goodbye BMM!

Google Ads New & Improved Match Types. Goodbye BMM!

Google recently announced the next evolution in its Keyword Match Types. In February 2021 we said “goodbye” to BMM and “hello” to the new & improved Phrase Match Type. In addition, Exact Match is more powerful and predictable, and Broad Match now considers more signals which should reduce the number of irrelevant search queries. Over the past few years Google has accelerated the pace of change to keywords. In exchange for taking away the control that Match Types once offered, Google continues to push solutions with better automation to help make decisions in auctions for advertisers. Today we explore what these changes mean and what you need to do about them. 

What’s changed to Match Types?

Overall, Google has made 3 changes to simplify Match Types:

  1. Broad Match Modifier (BMM) is dead. This is being absorbed into an evolved version of Phrase Match.
  2. Exact Match becomes more predictable. Similar to how it used to be.
  3. Broad Match should now deliver less irrelevant search queries due to the addition of new signals intended to deliver better relevance for the advertiser and user.

What does this mean?

Long term, Less time managing keywords. Short term, you’re going to be busy restructuring

Both BMM and Phrase tend to cover some of the same use cases. By sunsetting BMM, it makes accounts easier to manage. Long term, it will require a shift in Best Practice from the use of BMM to Phrase Match, so we’ll probably be spending most of the first half of 2021 restructuring accounts to accommodate these changes.

How will Phrase Match change?

Let’s explore the example that Google provided us. If you are currently targeting +moving +services +NYC +to +Boston as a Broad Match Modifier keyword you may appear against the search query “moving services NYC to Boston”. What’s annoying about BMM for this example is that it can also target “moving services Boston to NYC”. Obviously the intent is completely different here as it’s the opposite direction. This could serve irrelevant ads which reduce performance efficiency.

Of course, you should have the correct account structure and negative keywords in place to eliminate this with BMM. This creates granular approaches to accounts and ultimately gives advertisers a lot of control which Google thinks breeds bad practice for effective automation.

To combat this, the updated Phrase Match will continue to respect the word order which means much simpler account setups.Google Ads Help Keyword Match Types

Credit: Google Ads Help, 2021

With Phrase Match in the above example, the direction in the keyword will match the search query with the same intent. Here’s some more examples that Google has highlighted will take place after this update:Google Ads Help Keyword Match Types

Credit: Google Ads Help, 2021

Broad Match becomes more relevant

It’s a slight change, but it’s pretty impactful for Broad Match. Historically, Broad Match has always been “too broad” which would sometimes see advertisers targeting irrelevant search queries. This update will add in additional signals within the match type criteria which should improve both quality and relevance of the search queries.

An example of one of the signals is the Landing Page. Landing Pages will now be used as a sign to better qualify the relevance to a given search query. Think of it almost like how Dynamic Search Ad targeting acts today – without the dynamic ads.

Exact Match is more powerful

Google is making changes to Exact Match too by making it more precise. Other Match Types, or even close variants with a higher Ad Rank, will no longer compete with a query that is identical to the Exact Match. Put simply, search queries that exactly match the Exact Match keyword will always be preferred over other Match Types and variants. This is definitely a good thing. – Read more

#GoogleAds

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7 Tips For Writing An Irresistible Native Ad Headline

7 Tips For Writing An Irresistible Native Ad Headline

Writing native ad headlines can sometimes be more difficult than you initially expect because they require more precision than the regular PPC ads you might already be familiar with. Luckily, there are some things you need to remember that will help you make your native ad headlines stand out. Hence, here are the seven tips for writing an irresistible native ad headline.

#1 Be Concise and Get to The Point

First and foremost, you need to be concise and get to the point right away. As stressed by How To Create Thumb-Stopping Social Ads, it’s important to make your ads look organic, and if you put too much text into them, they will definitely stand out more than they should.

Write a headline that you like. Then, write another one based on the first one, but make it shorter. Strip it down to its basic and most important elements to make it concise and really get to the point of the message you want to convey to your target audience.

#2 Focus on The Audience – Not the Product

Some marketers believe that an ad should focus on the product and try to sell it as effectively as possible. But if you do that, you may start forgetting about the audience which can make your native ad headline too sales-y.

As Harper Donovan from the writing services reviews site Online Writers Rating puts it, “It’s really about finding a balance between the promotional and the valuable aspects of your ad. You need to sell your product – but you also need to do it in a way that doesn’t look like you are only worried about money. That would make it quite unappealing to your potential customers.”

#3 Tell Your Story Through Emotions

Telling your story through emotions is one of the best ways to incorporate both storytelling and branding into your native ad headline. Using emotions will help you connect with your audience better as well as keep their attention quite well.

You need to choose a particular mood for your ads and then stick to it. Do you want it to be inspiring or motivational? Shocking or provocative? Friendly or playful? Once you understand which direction you want the ad to take, you will be able to focus on emotions much better and use them more effectively. – Read more

#AdCopy #WritingAds #GoogleAds

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How to Achieve Success With Google Ads

How to Achieve Success With Google AdWords

Google Ads is an internet marketing platform developed by Google. It’s where advertisers bid on keywords to display short, contextual ads, service offers, product listings, and videos within search results. It can also place ads on websites, on social media, and on mobile applications. It lets website owners show up in search results for particular key phrases. You can achieve success with Google Ads.

To get a high placement in words, it’s best to know how the system works. When someone searches for something using a keyword, a bidding war breaks out between website owners who want to reach the top position in words. The highest bidder then gets the top slot in the Google search results for that searched phrase. The second highest bidder follows and so on.

To keep your ads at the top of the list, you need to have a good quality score. You can check your quality score online through the management tools. A high-quality score always means higher bids and click through rates. It also means more people are clicking on your ads, resulting in increased sales. So the goal is to get a high-quality score so that you can maximize your conversions.

Another important aspect of achieving high up results is to perform proper keyword and audience research. Keyword research is the process of selecting words people might search for a given product or service. Through audience research, you can determine which keywords will attract more viewers. Doing the correct research will give you an idea of what your target audience wants to see when they’re searching for a given term.

A great part of doing good keyword research is finding AdWords keyword planner tools. A keyword planner tool allows you to find keywords that will be successful in your ads. The tool will also provide you a list of competing AdWords, how much each keyword is worth, and other useful information. You can save this information to a text file so you can reference it for your next AdWords campaign. Doing good keyword research is critical if you want to maximize your advertising spend.

Finally, your AdWords campaign should be tracking constantly. Google offers a free Google Analytics account, which allows you to track your AdWords campaigns. If you don’t already have Google Analytics installed on your website, you can go to Google and sign up for their free account. Google Analytics is absolutely crucial to achieving success with your AdWords campaign.

Google AdWords is an internet marketing platform developed by Google, in which advertisers bid for positions to display short keyword-rich ads, product offerings, service offers, or video clips to website visitors. It may place ads both on search results and on non-search sites, on mobile applications, and video. In order to be eligible as an advertiser, you need to have a valid e-mail address and an active PayPal account. Google AdWords uses your PayPal account as it’s payment processor. When the campaign starts, you will be given an ad template with the option of changing the text and link of your ad. – Read More 

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Does Your Google Ad Spend Buy Better SEO?

Surely spending more on Google Ads will get you better placement in organic search also, right? That’s the claim that one Google sales representative allegedly made to a prospective client recently. But is it true that higher ad spend equals better organic results? Does your Ad spend Buy Better SEO?

Ever since Google Ads launched as AdWords on October 23, 2000, digital marketers have speculated that there must be a connection between dollars spent on pay-per-click (PPC) ads and performance in the free organic search results. Twenty-one years later, it’s still a common question that clients ask: “Can I buy better organic search performance by increasing my ad spend?”

The answer is, unequivocally: “No.”

Google Ads spend does not affect organic search performance in any way. Nor does participation in or purchase of any Google product from GSuite to the $150,000-per-year Google Analytics 360.

In Google’s words:

“While advertisers can pay more to be displayed higher in the advertising area, no one can buy better placement in the search results themselves.”– Google

“Search listings are free, and no one can pay for a better ranking, because Google is committed to keeping our search content useful and trustworthy. … Running a Google Ads campaign does not help your SEO rankings, despite some myths and claims.”– Google

To many, it seems like a logical connection: Giving Google more money should come with fringe benefits. But Google’s product isn’t search results, it’s the attention of human searchers. The search results are just bait to lure the searchers to Google so their attention can be sold to the highest Google Ads bidders. 

Searchers will only continue to give their attention to Google freely if Google’s search results are relevant and unbiased. Therefore, it’s in Google’s best interest to keep a distinct separation between church (organic results) and state (paid results).

It’s such an important aspect of Google’s business model that Googlers in all roles are educated about that separation when they’re hired — including, in theory, the errant sales rep. – Read more

#BuyBetterSEO?

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7 Lead Generation Landing Page Examples [+ Optimization Tips]

First impressions make all the difference – especially when you’re trying to generate leads for your business.

If a potential customer wants to get your lead magnet or sign up for your service (or product), there’s a good chance the first page they’ll see is your landing page. And if you want your business to thrive, your landing page needs to be effective.

If it works well, it can get more subscriptions, grab more email addresses, and even boost sales. But a poor landing page can leave a bad taste in your potential customer’s mouth and cost you a lot of your marketing budget. Without leads, your business won’t have customers. And well… we all know what happens to a business without customers 💀

This is why you need to master what a winning landing page looks like. Now let’s take a look at seven lead generation landing page examples that work well so you can draw inspiration from them. We’ll then also share landing page optimization tips that’ll help you drive even more leads from your campaigns. – Read more

Drop in Website Traffic? Follow this Step-by-Step

It’s every website owner’s worst nightmare – a sudden or continuous drop in traffic.

When such an unfortunate event occurs, the first port of action should be to understand why this is happening, since there are hundreds, if not thousands, of reasons why a website could see a drop in traffic.

It would be seemingly a very long article to list out every reason for a website dropping traffic. With this in mind, here is a step-by-step process I take when I notice a drop in traffic, to help eliminate the biggest potential reasons for it, to come to the conclusion that either 1) it’s natural or 2) I can do something about it.

  1. Check Google Analytics vs previous day, previous week, and previous year. This is the best way to first determine if you have a drop in traffic, or if it is a natural decline that will bounce back. For example:
    1. Checking vs the previous day will tell you if your website has seen an immediate drop in traffic.
    2. Checking vs the previous week will show you if the drop in traffic over multiple days is becoming a long term issue.
    3. If so, comparing it to a year before will show you natural occurrences in traffic modulation to not worry about. This works well for telling drops in traffic due to elections, holidays, religious festivals, and more.
  2. Check SEMRush/Ahrefs/Moz. All three of these tools are very good at predicting the traffic of a site through search engines, so if you see a drop in traffic over the last day or even a few days, the three SEM tools should be able to spot this too. If you do not see a drop in organic predicted traffic with these tools, then it’s safe to say your rankings have not declined, and it’s just a blip.

4 Helpful Tips to Get the Most Out of Your PPC Campaign

Are you ready to use pay-per-click ads for your business? Keep reading for some helpful tips to get the most out of your PPC campaigns.

Approximately 65 percent of all clicks made by searchers who are ready to make a purchase go to paid advertising (i.e., pay-per-click ads). In fact, these ads are what helped to generate the bulk of Google’s revenue in the past year.

Unfortunately, many business owners aren’t aware they can actually pay Google less and get better results. If you want to maximize your PPC (pay-per-click) campaigns and squeeze as much as you can out of every marketing penny, use the tips and information here.

After more than a decade working in the marketing industry and fine-tuning multiple PPC campaigns, I have found specific strategies and efforts that provide the desired results. Now, I will share these with you.

Determine Your Goals Before Creating a Campaign

Consider the specific action you want your searchers to take. This may be to call your store, visit a landing page, fill out your online form, buy a product, or learn more about your services. How are you going to measure this?

The best way to measure this is by tracking the conversions you achieve. Also, when you know what the end goal is, you will also know if your PPC marketing efforts are effective.

Determine If You Want Your Ad to Show Up in the Display Network or the Search Network

The search network is where your ads will appear in Google and in search engines that have partnered with Google. On the other hand, the display network lets your ads appear on thousands of websites in the Google Display Network, which shows Google Ads. If you are planning to run your ad in both, do so using separate campaigns.

It is important to note that one option is not necessarily better than the other, but one may be more effective for your specific niche than the other. You need to figure out where your target customers are, and then target that area with your PPC campaigns.

Use Geo-Targeting

When creating PPC ad campaigns, every dollar counts. This means you should take advantage of Google’s targeting feature— especially for targeting customers in specific geographic areas. You can use the targeting tool to consider factors such as page structure, link structure, language, and text. It will also help to determine the central themes of every webpage and then target ads based on the topic selections you have made.

Select the Proper Match Types

When setting up your ad campaign, there are four main match types you can choose from. These include:

  • Exact Match: The searcher must type in the specific keyword you have selected to see your ad.
  • Broad Match: With this, Google determines the search queries that are relevant to the keyword you have selected.
  • Phrase Match: The keyword must appear in the same order as the search query for your ad to appear.
  • Broad Match Modifier: Involves a mix of phrase and broad match and lets Google know the order that must be present for your ad to appear.
  • Read more

How to Get Google to Index Your Site (Faster)

For your landing pages, blogs, homepages, and other online content to show up in Google’s search engine results, you need to ensure your website is indexable. Google Index is basically a database.

When people use the search engine to look for content, Google turns to its index to provide the relevant content. If your page isn’t indexed, it doesn’t exist in Google’s search engine. That’s bad news if you’re hoping to drive organic traffic to your website via organic search.

This guide provides greater detail about indexing and why it’s important. It also explains how you can check to see if your page is indexed, how to fix common technical SEO problems that cause indexing issues, and how to quickly get Google to recrawl index your site if it’s not already indexed.

What Is Google’s Index?

Google’s index is simply a list of all the webpages that the search engine knows about. If Google doesn’t index your website, your site won’t appear in Google’s search results.

It would be like if you wrote a book, but no bookstores or libraries stocked that book. Nobody would ever find the book. They might not even know of its existence. And if a reader were looking for that book, they’d have a really hard time finding it.

Why Is Site Indexing Important?

Websites that aren’t indexed are not in Google’s database. The search engine thus can’t present these websites in its search engine results pages (SERPs).

To index websites, Google’s web crawlers (Googlebot) need to “crawl” that website. Learn more about the difference between crawlability versus indexability

As a refresher, here’s a quick overview of the search engine process:

  • Crawling: Search engine bots crawl the website to figure out if it’s worth indexing. Web spiders, or “Googlebot,” are always crawling the web, following links on existing web pages to find new content.
  • Indexing: The search engine adds the website to its database (in Google’s case, its “Index”).
  • Ranking: The search engine ranks the website in terms of metrics like relevance and user-friendliness.

Indexing just means the site is stored in Google’s databases. It doesn’t mean it will show up at the top of the SERPs. Indexing is controlled by predetermined algorithms, which factor in elements like web user demand and quality checks. You can influence indexing by managing how spiders discover your online content.

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How Do I Check If Google Has Indexed My Site?

There’s no doubt that you want your website to be indexed — but how can you know if it is or not? Luckily, the search engine giant makes it pretty easy to find out where you stand via site search. Here’s how to check:

  1. Go to Google’s search engine.
  2. In the Google search bar, type in “site:example.com.”
  3. When you look under the search bar, you’ll see the Google results categories “All,” “Images,” “News,” etc. Right underneath this, you’ll see an estimate of how many of your pages Google has indexed.
  4. If zero results show up, the page isn’t indexed.

Alternatively, you can use Google Search Console to check if your page is indexed. It’s free to set up an account. Here’s how to get the information you want:

  1. Log into Google Search Console.
  2. Click on “Index.”
  3. Click on “Coverage.”
  4. You’ll see the number of valid pages indexed.
  5. If the number of valid pages is zero, Google hasn’t indexed your page.

You can also use the Search Console to check whether specific pages are indexed. Just paste the URL into the URL Inspection Tool. If the page is indexed, you’ll receive the message “URL is on Google.”

How Long Does It Take for Google to Index a Site?

It can take Google anywhere from a few days to a few weeks to index a site. This can be frustrating if you’ve just launched a page only to discover that it isn’t indexed. How is anybody supposed to discover your beautiful new webpage via Google? Luckily, there are steps you can take for more efficient indexing. Below, we explain what you can do to speed up the process.

How Do I Get Google to Index My Site?

The easiest way to get your site indexed is to request indexing through Google Search Console. To do this, go to Google Search Console’s URL Inspection Tool. Paste the URL you want to be indexed into the search bar and wait for Google to check the URL. If the URL isn’t indexed, click the “Request Indexing” button.

Note: Google had temporarily disabled the request indexing tool in October 2020. However, it was just restored in Search Console!

However, Google indexing takes time. As mentioned, if your site is new, it won’t be indexed overnight. Additionally, if your site isn’t properly set up to accommodate Googlebot’s crawling, there’s a chance it won’t get indexed at all.

Whether you’re a site owner or an online marketer, you want your site efficiently indexed. Here’s how to make that happen. – Read more

Lessons Learned in Automated Bidding for PPC

Automated bidding, dear reader, is here to stay whether you’ve been embracing it with arms wide open or neglecting it like the Dursleys neglected Harry P.

I started in this industry right around the same time automation was just starting to be rolled out, much less considered as a viable strategy for improved performance!

Enhanced Cost Per Click (ECPC) bidding was the first automated bid strategy I remember Google debuting and, in hindsight, it really was a brilliant way to start to get us Digital Strategists/Account Managers to start slowly, very slowly, getting comfortable with automation.

Why The Slow Adoption?

As with most things, there are the innovators, early adopters, and late adopters. I’ve often believed that it’s most advantageous to be in the innovator/early adopter groups if for no other reason than to have a type of first-mover advantage. I think this is less true with automated bidding, compared to things like RSAs, however, the general adoption curve still holds true. And that’s the thing about the adoption curve – sooner or later we all adopt the new tech/process. Automated bidding is no exception.

early adopters chart

I think the one thing that most of us struggled with when it came to adopting automation was relinquishing control. To embrace automation meant letting go of much of what we had been taught/previously found successes in. A peer of mine, Dani Gonzales, discusses that idea in more depth in her blog, “A Guide For Letting Go of Outdated Google Search Best Practices”.

How to Make it Work

Automated bidding is inherently different from manual bidding in the sense that the bidding algorithm can actually learn over time and make gradual improvements. “How does automated bidding learn to make those improvements?” you ask? Simply put, the bidding algorithm, over time, takes all the data points we’re feeding into it and learns to recognize patterns. Those patterns allow the bidding algorithm to recognize patterns that lead to success (like a conversion) or patterns that lead to failure (a non-converting click).

With that said, this means that in order to find success with automated bidding, we have to structure our accounts in ways that would maximize the amount of data going into a single bidding strategy. As per Dani’s post, gone are the days of hyper-segmentation of our account structures. The goal being to maximize the number of impressions or clicks/ad groups. In doing so, we allow the automated bidding process to learn as quickly as possible.

Attempting to make use of automated bidding while still adhering to the best practices of yesteryear is likely a reason why you may have yet to have found success with automated bidding. I certainly didn’t find automated bidding to be successful right off the bat but through trial and error I’ve found that automated bidding is able to not only outperform manual bidding but it also saves you a lot of time. Time that is better spent strategizing than manually changing bids once a week.

The key here is consolidation. Consolidate your campaigns/ad groups as much as you can and, if possible, segment those new campaigns or ad groups by intent or business objective, rather than match type. – Read more