How AdWords Attribution Can Make Your Marketing Budget More Efficient

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What is AdWords attribution I hear you ask? Well, essentially AdWords attribution can be understood as which of your AdWords campaigns is responsible for your conversions.

The session was hosted by Patrick & Eustace who are attribution experts within Google’s Dublin HQ. They started by giving us an overview of what attribution is and why it is important.

Did you know that more than half of web traffic is now concentrated through mobile devices typically on smartphones? As we are sure you are aware, however, conversions are typically lower on smartphones, well the reason for this may not simply be down to what you would typically assume about mobile devices.

Users will regularly go through on average five interactions before they take the final purchasing decision – these means that users don’t only not convert because of your mobile layout, but can also be down to users being at a different stage on the customer journey, perhaps users came to your landing page while in the research stage for example. 75% of adults online will start an activity on one device but finish on another. This means your traditional attribution to conversions model may be out of date – maybe you are just tracking conversion down to the last campaign a user interacts with as opposed to the journey in its totality, this is wrong and may be leading to wasted marketing spend!

This is where AdWords attribution comes into play, there are a variety of options in terms of how you attribute your conversions that can be used to give a clearer picture and using “ last click” or “first click” attribution is to be discouraged if you want to identify which campaign is contributing what value to your final conversions. – Read more

Tips on testing responsive search ads

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Are the additional characters or RSAs generating better results or more problems?

Have you been testing Google’s responsive search ads, but are still not sure what to make of them? You’re not alone.

Cara deBeer, paid search director at Catalyst, and Brad Geddes, co-founder of Adalysis, discussed what they’ve seen so far from testing responsive search ads (RSAs) against enhanced text ads (ETAs) in a session at SMX West last week.

In her presentation, deBeer discussed some of the limitations of RSAs (namely detailed reporting) and ways to evaluate how your RSAs are really doing. Looking at case studies from client accounts, deBeer showed test results at the aggregated account level that seemed to indicate mixed results — lower click-through rates (CTR), higher conversion rates (CVR) — for RSAs compared to ETAs. Looking at various segments, however, the data looked a bit different.

Label and segment for deeper insights

“We need to dig into various segments to see areas for opportunity, even if it looks like RSAs aren’t doing well,” said deBeer.

She showed results segmented by device, match type, brand and non-brand, at the product level by geographic market to identify pockets of insights.

Her parting advice was, “Everyone should test RSAs, but not everyone should test them all the time.”

If you’re in a regulated area like pharma or need to tightly control your ad copy, RSAs are not for you. But, deBeer said, if you want to take advantage of the additional real estate of RSAs, are able to label the different ad formats for analysis and have a handful of top, high volume ad groups that will allow you to use existing reporting and be able to segment your results, then she recommends testing RSAs.

Geddes presented data looking across thousands of accounts. This aggregated data suggested using RSAs “if you want high CTRs on broad matched keywords and aren’t conversion focused” and to use ETAs “if you are conversion focused.” On the whole, Geddes says they see RSAs driving higher CTR and lower CVR than enhanced text ads. In other words, RSA can function well for driving upper-funnel traffic. – Read more

YouTube SEO: 5 Hacks for Quicker, Better YouTube Keyword Research

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Proper YouTube keyword research is the backbone of a good YouTube SEO strategy.

Why? Because finding the right YouTube keywords could mean the difference between your ideal shopper catching your content, or your content being a complete traffic dead-zone.

The first thing you want to do before getting your research on is to do a keyword audit of your YouTube content and channel. This means looking at the following metrics:

  • Google Analytics traffic sources, which point to search volumes
  • Video view times, which could show you where the relevance of keywords to video content is lacking
  • Playback locations, which show demographic opportunities
  • Real-Time Reports, which show your estimated views in real-time
  • Audience retention, which could point to the relevancy of your keywords
  • Shares, likes, dislikes, comments and subscriber rates, which give you an idea of your content (and keyword) engagement

Once you know where you stand, you will know which content needs a keyword revamp. This will also help shape your YouTube keyword strategy by giving you insights into what is or isn’t working – a strategy you can duplicate in terms of keywords in the future. The first step to optimizing your channel and/or content keywords is doing proper research, which doesn’t need to be a tedious affair.

So, how do you streamline your YouTube keyword research so that you’re not only finding better keywords but finding them in a quicker, more efficient way? With these five hacks, of course!

Let’s jump straight in.

1. Take Advantage of YouTube Auto-Complete
YouTube’s auto-complete is a gold mine of important long-tail keywords in your niche. And we know just how critical long-tail keywords are to establishing rank in competitive niches and driving more targeted potential shoppers.

YouTube’s auto-complete will help you find popular YouTube search phrases that you may not have thought of for your main store keywords. It can also point to popular content that your shoppers could be interested in seeing – therefore giving you a host of new video marketing ideas, as well as possible new popular products. – Read more

Now your Google text ads can show on YouTube search results, too

My Post (43).jpgGoogle says early tests have shown similar performance results for text ads on YouTube and Google Search.

  • SAN JOSE — With the introductions of features such as location extensions and calls-to-action in TrueView for Action Ads, YouTube ads have been gaining performance elements native to traditional Search advertising. Taking this a step further, YouTube announced Wednesday at SMX West in San Jose that Search text ads can now extend onto YouTube.

What is changing? Google is incorporating YouTube into its Search Partners network.

What does this mean? Now, when Search text ad campaigns are opted-into Search Partners, your text ads may appear on YouTube search results pages when users search for keywords relevant to your campaign on the video platform — but solely on mobile. At this point, text ads will only appear in the mobile search feed on YouTube. – Read more

Google adds voice input and spoken results to mobile web search

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The search giant appears to be conditioning searchers to use voice across all platforms.

Google has added a microphone to the Google.com search field on Android phones to enable mobile web voice search. It’s an interesting move given that users could already do voice search on the mobile web, with the Android keyboard microphone.

A new mic icon. Below are screens from Android on the left and the iPhone on the right, showing Google.com search results. The iPhone doesn’t show the mic, although the keyboard allows voice input. The search phrase is “what percentage of mobile queries are voice searches?”

Beyond the microphone icon inside the search box, the major difference — a significant one — is that users will hear a spoken response now with Android mobile web searches rather than simply get a set of “silent” results. This voice response may encourage people to undertake more searches while their eyes are occupied, such as when they are cooking or driving.

This may or may not technically be the Google Assistant in action. But for all practical purposes that’s how it appears. – Read more

The Most Critical Google Ads (AdWords) Trends of 2019

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The SEM landscape changes from year to year. Google Ads expert Felix Wenzel shares the trends he predicts for 2019.

Search engine marketing (SEM) has been a game-changing marketing tool for companies for the last ten years. But today, creating a simple ad is not enough to keep driving traffic to websites. Search has become so complex that it is prohibitively difficult for the average individual to create a successful search ad.

AdPoint Agency, a premier Google Partner, asked its resident expert and Managing Director, Felix Wenzel, how to build profitable SEM campaigns in 2019. A frequent coach to standing-room-only sessions at the Google Digital Garages in Hamburg, Germany during 2018, Felix outlines some key opportunities and challenges that he expects to see from Google Ads in 2019.

Smart Features – bring complications, but offer advantages

The update from Google AdWords to Google Ads brings many new features, including more automated and smart options, like Smart Campaigns, with new and updated tools integrated directly into the Google Marketing platform.

These updates have great potential but they could have both positive and negative effects for users. While the new features open up possibilities for professionals, these same features could confuse and discourage novice search advertisers. –  Read More

How to Get Started with Remarketing on Google Ads & Facebook

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For those of us who work in digital advertising, any chance we have to make our online strategic approach more successful is much appreciated.

Using remarketing (a.k.a., retargeting) is that chance.

It is a second chance to advertise, an opportunity to cross-sell or an opportunity to nurture your audience with your content marketing efforts.

Inversely, if needed, it is a way to exclude audience targeting and hold advertising dollars for new eyes only.

This Is Old News, Right?

Technically, yes.

Google began remarketing offering for display advertising as far back as 2010. Then remarketing showed up in search advertising in 2013.

So, yes, it has been around for quite a while.

Surprisingly, though, I only see a few new clients who are taking advantage of remarketing – or who even know what it is.

The beauty of remarketing is that our audience targets are what I like to call a “considerate” audience. They know who you are. – Read more

Demystifying Google’s guide to clicks, impressions and position in Google Search Console

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Here are the answers to the most common questions asked about managing metrics in the Performance reporting in GSC.

Google Search Console is packed with important information for site owners and SEOs. Via GSC, Google has done a great job providing reporting and functionality that can help you diagnose problems, understand your organic search traffic, test your site and more.

That said, there are some confusing things that you can come across while traversing the reporting in GSC, and that’s especially the case for those new to SEO. One example is the Performance reporting, which used to be called Search Analytics. The Performance reporting provides a ton of information about your organic search traffic, including queries leading to your site, landing pages ranking in Search, the click-through rate (CTR) for queries and landing pages, average position for queries ranking in Google and more. It’s a powerful report that I’m often analyzing.

While helping clients with SEO, I’ve found some of the metrics could be confusing. For example, it’s extremely important to understand what constitutes an impression and click, and how Google calculates position for queries and landing pages. After speaking with many clients about their own reporting, it’s clear there needed to be a guide for how this works.

And Google delivered! – Read more

How to Find New Placements to Target on the Google Ads Display Network

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I miss the Display Planner. It was one of my favorite tools in the old AdWords interface. When Google decided to remove the tool from Google Ads, PPC marketers lost a valuable asset for planning out display campaigns.

While I still want the tool back, we can create successful managed placement campaigns in Google Ads. It just takes a little bit more work on our end. (Thanks Google!) Here are a few tactics I use for finding new placements to target.

Look at What Traffic Is Already Working

I love talking about how Google Analytics can usually answer the question, “Who should I target first?” This post is no exception. Whenever I get the opportunity to set up my first display campaign in an account, one of the first places I like to look is the Referrals report in Google Analytics. The Referrals report lives under the Acquisition > All Traffic portion of Google Analytics. Typically, I like to sort by most conversions (or revenue for ecommerce businesses) to see which referral sources are sending quality traffic to my site.  – Read more

 

 

Google AdWords Express is Now Part of Google Ads

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Google is notifying advertisers that AdWords Express has joined the Google Ads platform.

AdWords Express campaigns are now available in Google Ads as ‘Smart’ campaigns.

Previously, AdWords Express was a standalone solution, designed to be a lower maintenance option for small businesses.

Now, Smart campaigns still have all the same benefits as AdWords Express campaigns, but with improved features.

Google highlights the following benefits: – Read more