An in-depth look at the importance of bounce rate

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A good user experience results in a low bounce rate. Here is an in-depth look at the bounce rate and what companies can do to reduce theirs.

Bounce rate is a metric that helps determine a webpage’s strength. Bounce rate is shown in a number of different Google Analytics reports and is often used by webmasters to determine whether the content of a page satisfies the intent of the user.

Primarily, companies want their website to have low bounce rates. A good user experience results in a low bounce rate. Here is an in-depth look at the bounce rate and what companies can do to reduce theirs.

Bounces Kill Search Ranking
You may have spent a lot of time and money ranking your web site with national SEO techniques but if users click on your listing on Google and then bounce back to Google that clearly shows a search engine that you should not rank for a query.

User engagement and behavior on a site can increase bounce rates and drop ranking very quickly. Google has the goal of returning the best possible search results possible to fulfill queries. Happy search users will continue using their search engine. But bounces show search engines that a query was not solved or that a site returned a poor user experience.

What Is Bounce Rate
A bounce rate is a number that shows the number of users that landed on a particular website, but left the page without interacting on it. Companies that use Google Analytics on their websites have access to their bounce rate. The analytics keep track of every option performed on a page.

However, when the server only receives one request from the page, that means that the user left the page without doing anything. The complete formula used to find the bounce rate involves all single page sessions being divided by the total number of sessions. Keep in mind that the bounce rate is only calculated for landing pages. – Read more

 

YouTube SEO: 5 Hacks for Quicker, Better YouTube Keyword Research

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Proper YouTube keyword research is the backbone of a good YouTube SEO strategy.

Why? Because finding the right YouTube keywords could mean the difference between your ideal shopper catching your content, or your content being a complete traffic dead-zone.

The first thing you want to do before getting your research on is to do a keyword audit of your YouTube content and channel. This means looking at the following metrics:

  • Google Analytics traffic sources, which point to search volumes
  • Video view times, which could show you where the relevance of keywords to video content is lacking
  • Playback locations, which show demographic opportunities
  • Real-Time Reports, which show your estimated views in real-time
  • Audience retention, which could point to the relevancy of your keywords
  • Shares, likes, dislikes, comments and subscriber rates, which give you an idea of your content (and keyword) engagement

Once you know where you stand, you will know which content needs a keyword revamp. This will also help shape your YouTube keyword strategy by giving you insights into what is or isn’t working – a strategy you can duplicate in terms of keywords in the future. The first step to optimizing your channel and/or content keywords is doing proper research, which doesn’t need to be a tedious affair.

So, how do you streamline your YouTube keyword research so that you’re not only finding better keywords but finding them in a quicker, more efficient way? With these five hacks, of course!

Let’s jump straight in.

1. Take Advantage of YouTube Auto-Complete
YouTube’s auto-complete is a gold mine of important long-tail keywords in your niche. And we know just how critical long-tail keywords are to establishing rank in competitive niches and driving more targeted potential shoppers.

YouTube’s auto-complete will help you find popular YouTube search phrases that you may not have thought of for your main store keywords. It can also point to popular content that your shoppers could be interested in seeing – therefore giving you a host of new video marketing ideas, as well as possible new popular products. – Read more

Now your Google text ads can show on YouTube search results, too

My Post (43).jpgGoogle says early tests have shown similar performance results for text ads on YouTube and Google Search.

  • SAN JOSE — With the introductions of features such as location extensions and calls-to-action in TrueView for Action Ads, YouTube ads have been gaining performance elements native to traditional Search advertising. Taking this a step further, YouTube announced Wednesday at SMX West in San Jose that Search text ads can now extend onto YouTube.

What is changing? Google is incorporating YouTube into its Search Partners network.

What does this mean? Now, when Search text ad campaigns are opted-into Search Partners, your text ads may appear on YouTube search results pages when users search for keywords relevant to your campaign on the video platform — but solely on mobile. At this point, text ads will only appear in the mobile search feed on YouTube. – Read more

Google adds voice input and spoken results to mobile web search

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The search giant appears to be conditioning searchers to use voice across all platforms.

Google has added a microphone to the Google.com search field on Android phones to enable mobile web voice search. It’s an interesting move given that users could already do voice search on the mobile web, with the Android keyboard microphone.

A new mic icon. Below are screens from Android on the left and the iPhone on the right, showing Google.com search results. The iPhone doesn’t show the mic, although the keyboard allows voice input. The search phrase is “what percentage of mobile queries are voice searches?”

Beyond the microphone icon inside the search box, the major difference — a significant one — is that users will hear a spoken response now with Android mobile web searches rather than simply get a set of “silent” results. This voice response may encourage people to undertake more searches while their eyes are occupied, such as when they are cooking or driving.

This may or may not technically be the Google Assistant in action. But for all practical purposes that’s how it appears. – Read more

Understanding Website User Engagement with Google Analytics Metrics

My Post (38).jpg15 seconds. The amount of time that most users spend on a website and the amount of time you have to capture your audience’s attention. So how do you know whether users are engaged, and what can you do to increase user engagement on your website?

Most marketers use Google Analytics to track the performance of their website overall, but not all are leveraging the data to glean insights into user engagement. The following metrics are key to benchmarking, tracking, and improving your website engagement. Here’s what they mean and what to do to increase engagement.

Average session duration
Think of a session as a visit. Average session duration is the average amount of time your visitors spend looking around your site. Each user can have multiple sessions or visits that all factor in, and so more frequent users will weigh more heavily when it comes to this metric. Industry experts have differing opinions on this, but anything above 1.5 minutes is considered a good average session duration.

Generally, sites with higher average session duration feature longer scrolling pages with interactivity throughout. Interaction can come in many forms, such as infographics that can be manipulated by the user, animated blocks of content, “lazy-loading” content that populates as you scroll down the page are just a few examples.

Average session duration is a broad metric that can give you a snapshot of your site’s engagement. Pairing it with the following metrics can shed more insight into what you might be able to do to increase time spent on your site. – Read more

What Search Marketers Need to Know About Attribution in 2019

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Biddable media is highly technology-driven.

That’s why it’s so awesome, but also why it’s so confusing at times.

To really excel in this industry, you need to know what to ignore and what to pay attention to.

This is certainly the case when it comes to attribution.

In this post, I’d like to give you a helping hand in the filtering process, based on my own company’s research into this issue.

I’m going to focus on attribution from a paid search perspective. So naturally, I’ll be talking about attribution models within Google Ads, and Google Analytics.

I’ll also consider a few independent analytics companies’ approaches to attribution, and finally the newcomer, Facebook Attribution.

I am not attempting to seriously critique any of the software referred to in this post. My aim is to provide guidance on the right questions to ask about attribution this year. – Read more

What is attribution modeling?

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Everything you need to know about attribution, including its benefits and limitations.

Understanding the steps a customer takes before converting can be just as valuable to marketers as the sale itself. Attribution models are used to assign credit to touchpoints in the customer journey.

For example, if a consumer bought an item after clicking on an display ad, it’s easy enough to credit that entire sale to that one display ad. But what if a consumer took a more complicated route to purchase? She might have initially clicked on the company’s display, then clicked on a social ad a week later, downloaded the company app, then visited the website from an organic search listing and and converted in-store using a coupon in the mobile app. These days, that’s a relatively simple path to conversion.

Attribution aims to help marketers get a better picture of when and how various marketing channels play contribute to conversion events. That information can then be used to inform future budget allocations.

Attribution models

Following are several of the most common attribution models.

  • Last-click attribution. With this model, all the credit goes to the customer’s last touchpoint before converting. This one-touch model doesn’t take into consideration any other engagements the user may with the company’s marketing efforts leading up to that last engagement.
  • First-click attribution. The other one-touch model, first-click attribution, gives 100 percent of the credit to the first action the customer took on their conversion journey. It ignores any subsequent engagements the customer may have had with other marketing efforts before converting.
  • Linear attribution. This multi-touch attribution model gives equal credit to each touchpoint along the user’s path.
  • Time decay attribution. This model gives the touchpoints that occured closer to the time of the conversion more credit than touchpoints further back in time. The closer in time to the event, the more credit a touchpoint receives.
  • U-shaped attribution. The first and last engagement get the most credit and the rest is assigned equally to the touchpoints that occured in between. In Google Analytics, the first and last engagements are each given 40 percent of the credit and the other 20 percent is distributed equally across the middle interactions. – Read more

Here’s why you should take a deep dive into data to optimize your conversions

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A thorough audit of tracking tools can improve your CRO framework because knowing your platform will help you think about how to best use it for your specific business strategy.

So, you got the basics of Conversion Rate Optimization (CRO) and why it’s essential to your marketing strategy. (To recap: a successful CRO framework increase sales and revenue while reducing the cost of paid media.) Great! But how do you get started? There are some general things everyone can focus on to improve their conversion rate, e.g. site speed. But where’s the list of best practices, you may be wondering? The unfortunate reality is that there’s no convenient checklist waiting for you. There’s quite a bit more to CRO than applying a few changes, crossing your fingers and walking away hoping for the best.

Data and analytics inform CRO

Optimizing conversions works on a case-by-case basis. Each brand, site and customer journey is different. There are millions of sites out there with varying needs, goals, traffic, designs, languages. You can’t take what works for one site and apply it to another. Your site should serve a specific purpose; both providing value and addressing the concerns of your visitors at that moment and in the future. Forget instinct: to make any kind of business decision; you need to base your judgment on the evidence. Also known as data. Otherwise, you might be making decisions that could hurt your sales.

Analytics tells you exactly what’s happening on your site, and can then guide you to investigate the bigger picture and find opportunities. Not only does analytics tell you the core journeys and behaviors that give you the best return on investment, but it also highlights friction points and areas where most people leave the website. This saves a lot of time and guesswork, letting you narrow down the improvements that need to be made to optimize conversions. The real power comes when combining this with qualitative research, to delve into the reasoning behind the key objections that result in people leaving… but also why they stay. – Read more

Google Analytics: How to Track PayPal Transactions

My Post (30).jpgMerchants have many options for accepting online payments. “PayPal Payments Standard” is popular, but it can be challenging for Google Analytics to report the sale.

Using PayPal Payments Standard, customers leave the merchant’s website for their account at PayPal. After they complete payment, customers are redirected by PayPal back to the URL provided by the merchant.

There are two issues that can impact reporting in Google Analytics from this process.

First, the customer may not make it back to the merchant’s order confirmation page to trigger ecommerce reporting in Google Analytics. If the return URL is not set properly, the customer may not go back at all or may go back to the merchant’s home page or some other page. None will trigger the Google Analytics ecommerce code. A correct return URL will send the customer back to the order confirmation page, and the Google Analytics ecommerce code fires upon arrival.

This return URL is typically provided by the ecommerce platform in the payment settings. In PayPal, the return URL settings reside behind the gear icon in the top-right after logging in. – Read more

How to Get Started with Remarketing on Google Ads & Facebook

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For those of us who work in digital advertising, any chance we have to make our online strategic approach more successful is much appreciated.

Using remarketing (a.k.a., retargeting) is that chance.

It is a second chance to advertise, an opportunity to cross-sell or an opportunity to nurture your audience with your content marketing efforts.

Inversely, if needed, it is a way to exclude audience targeting and hold advertising dollars for new eyes only.

This Is Old News, Right?

Technically, yes.

Google began remarketing offering for display advertising as far back as 2010. Then remarketing showed up in search advertising in 2013.

So, yes, it has been around for quite a while.

Surprisingly, though, I only see a few new clients who are taking advantage of remarketing – or who even know what it is.

The beauty of remarketing is that our audience targets are what I like to call a “considerate” audience. They know who you are. – Read more