How to Tell Google Your Content Has Been Updated

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There’s not a rule per se as to how much content needs to be updated, but you can use your common sense.

If all you change is a few words or a date, or just add a picture for example, you aren’t really changing the content.

People like to try to game this system by moving paragraphs around but not really changing the point of an article, for example. Google is wise to this and will not reward you for it.

However, if you have an article like “5 Predictions for SEO in 2018” and you update it to be “5 Predictions for SEO in 2019” and actually change most of the content, there are ways to help Google find out about it more quickly.

But before I share that, I want to be clear: the content needs to be different.

You can’t just post the same five predictions you made in 2018 and put them in a different order.

You can’t use four of the same five and just change one.

That’s not going to fly.

I use a real-world test. If I sent this article via email to my loyal followers, would they find value in it, or would I be irritating them by sending the same thing I previously sent?

Google is likely to react similarly. – Read more

It’s Time to Retest Your Page Speed [Google’s Latest Update]

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Back in October, we were the first to claim that 2019 will be the year of page speed. We’ve got our eyes on the market and lemme tell you: Google is sending serious signals that it’s crunch time to deal with your slow pages.

Faster pages are a strategic marketing priority.

And sure enough, Google has made yet another change to uphold that prediction. In early November, they quietly rolled out the most significant update to a core performance tool we’ve seen to date, announcing the latest version of PageSpeed Insights.

So what does this update mean for marketers and their bottom line?

If you’ve used PageSpeed Insights to test page performance, it’s time to retest! Because your old speed scores don’t matter anymore. The good news is that you’ll have new data at your fingertips to help you speed up in ways that actually matter to your prospects and potential conversions. – Read more

Google Ads Brings Merchant Promotions to Shopping Actions

My Post303.jpgGoogle Ads is bringing its Merchant Promotions program to Shopping Actions for retailers.

This integration allows online retailers to add promotions to their Shopping Actions inventory.

Customers will see the promotion wherever the discounted products show up in Google Express.

Here’s an example of what it will look like: – Read More

Google Lets Users Add Hashtags to Business Reviews

My Post1103.jpgGoogle reviews in Maps and Google My Business can now include hashtags, making them even more searchable.

This addition was rolled out without announcement, but TechCrunch reports that Google confirmed the hashtags were rolled out over a week ago.

Currently they can only be added when writing reviews on Android devices.

Up to five hashtags can be added to reviews, and Google suggests appending them to the end of reviews rather than incorporating them into the main text. – Read More

Google My Business API v4.3 has been released

My Post1102.jpgThe new Google My Business API adds read and respond to customer Q&A, read reviews in bulk, identify unclaimed locations, report location issues and much more.

Google released an update to the Google My Business API, the method developers can use to obtain data from Google My Business. The new version is numbered 4.3 and brings the addition of Q&A APIs so you can retrieve questions, post answers, and provide FAQs. It also lets you read reviews in bulk, identify unclaimed locations, report location issues and much more.

Here is a full list of what is new and what has changed in version 4.3: – Read More

Google Ads – Extending call and message reporting to more places

My Post1101.jpgStarting this week, calls from your location extensions can be counted as conversions once you enable account-level call reporting.

The default length of a call that will be counted as a conversion is 60 seconds, and you can change that value at any time based on your business goals. Measuring calls that last over a certain duration can be a helpful indicator of which campaigns, ads, and keywords are driving the highest quality interactions with customers. – Read More

Google releases Target Impression Share, its latest Smart Bidding strategy

My Post161.jpgThe automated bidding feature aims to maximize reach and awareness.

If you’re looking to maximize reach for your paid search campaigns, Google Ads has just released a new Smart Bidding strategy called target impression share.

What is it? Target impression share is designed to maximize, well, your share of search ad impressions against the competition. Or, as Google puts it, “show in a certain percentage of eligible auctions.”

How does it work? With target impression share bidding, Google’s system will automatically set bids to achieve the share goal. You can set one of three placement options for this strategy: absolute top of the page (position one), top of the page (above the organic results), or anywhere on the page (above or below the organic results). – Read more

Why your Google Shopping strategy is failing and how to fix it

My Post141.jpgIf retailers are to make the most of their advertising budget, they need to take Google Shopping seriously rather than simply diverting budget from text ads to Shopping ads

Expert testing strategies for both low and high volume PPC accounts

My Post140.jpgTesting takes strategy no matter the account size, but low and high volume accounts have different needs. Amalia Fowler and Aaron Levy discussed testing from both perspectives at SMX East.

In a session at SMX East on testing in paid search accounts, speakers Amalia Fowler, account director at Snaptech Marketing, and Aaron Levy, director of paid search at Elite SEM, approached the topic from two polar perspectives: low volume accounts and enterprise-scale accounts. The juxtaposition made for engaging discussion.

Amalia Fowler on testing in low volume accounts

In discussing testing risks and challenges for low conversion volume accounts, Fowler stressed the need to be extra selective and strategic about what you test. She provided a template for a “What if” testing ideas spreadsheet in which teams can collaborate to capture what has been tested in the past, those results and ideas for future tests.

“We need to consider, what would happen if [the test] failed? Is the business going to be okay? Will stakeholders be okay with failure?” said Fowler. Importantly, she added, “We need a hypothesis for every test. That’s the guiding force for the entire testing process.”

Particularly for low volume accounts, it may be necessary to test across multiple campaigns or ad groups. Fowler also said she sometimes lowers the statistical confidence level for a test from 95 percent to 90 percent. Google Ads’ draft and experiments confidence level is 95 percent, she noted. “Define your minimum necessary data. And prepare other people to wait for tests to complete when you have low volume accounts,” she advised.

No matter the account volume, however, Fowler said, “Don’t wait until something is broken to start testing. Be proactive rather than reactive.” For more tips, see the full presentation below. – Read more

5 tips to reduce CPC in Google AdWords

My Post139.jpgRunning Google AdWords campaigns? 5 tips to reduce CPC while not damaging your AdRank, reach, conversions, and performance.