How long does it take for AdWords conversions

My Post122125.jpg

A marketer relies on AdWords conversion tracking to optimize the performance.

Trying to make the best possible decision for AdWords conversions the majority of the people stuck their heads arguing about low performing keywords with the clients. At the end the decision based on conversion data that is inside Google Analytics. For making it easier, some people switched to AdWords conversion in Google Analytics.

When a conversion triggered from AdWords, it might take up to 24 hours to show it up in Google Analytics. However, if some import goals in google conversion it can take up to 24-72 hours. This first step is to point out all the errors; the next is to eliminate those errors by using error-killing tools for google analytics mistakes.

The AdWords conversion in google analytics might take a day or two to show up properly in google analytics.This can be a bit difficult if you might have more than transactions. The best way to setup, an Ad word is to link a google analytics goal to Ad Word as a conversion. Then the next step is to confirm that if tracking is working properly for Google Analytics or not.

For having a check on it, a person visited your website from an Ad came back in 30 days period, this conversion recorded in AdWords on the day when a person first clicked on the link. Moreover, it depends on how you set goals in analytics you might be able to see it on an actualday. – Read more

How to Use Event Tracking to Significantly Improve Your Website

My Post606.jpg

Getting better results from your website starts with collecting the right data and understanding how to extract insights from it. Before you can improve performance, you need to know what users are getting up to on your website and measure how this aligns with your marketing objectives. Event tracking is one of the more advanced Google Analytics features that allows you to track specific user actions on your website – down to the very elements they’re clicking on. With these data insights, you can measure how effectively key parts of your page are performing and diagnose issues with more precision.

Here’s what you need to know about event tracking in Google Analytics.

What is event tracking in Google Analytics?

Event tracking is a Google Analytics tool that can be used to measure user actions on your website. More specifically, it allows you to track every time a user clicks on a specific element; a link, a buy button, the play button on your video, etc. Or, you can also use event tracking to measure how far a user scrolls down the page, to understand how they’re engaging with your content.

This means you can track just about every action people are taking on your website, measure performance against highly-specific metrics and KPIs (e.g. video views, PDF downloads, etc) and test new variations against the data that matters most.

Essentially, event tracking takes off the blindfold and allows you to see what users are really doing on your site. – Read more

 

Connected TV Device Targeting, Reporting, & Management

My Post603.jpgStarting on Jan 8, 2019 you will be able to target and generate reports for a new device category via the AdWords API – connected TV.

The connected TV platform, (or “TV screens,” as it’s referred to in the new Google Ads experience), is a new Platform type similar to desktop, tablet, and mobile. It targets devices such as smart TVs, gaming consoles and standalone connected devices including Chromecast, Roku, and AppleTV.

Since connected TV shares the same functionality as the three existing platforms, you can target or exclude it using bid modifiers for Display/Video ad campaigns; the new criterion will have a platformName of “ConnectedTv” and an ID of 30004. You can also isolate it in reports using a Device segment named CONNECTED_TV. Note that even though bidding will only be supported for Display and Video ads, some residual traffic may appear in other kinds of reports so you should still pull the new segment for non Display/Video ad reports. – Read more

How to Analyze Audience Performance with Google Analytics

My Post402.jpg

Audiences play an integral role in most paid media strategies.

The ability to create targeted audiences based on key indicators makes for a great way to hone in on warm audiences.

Audiences also act as a connector across campaigns and even channels, allowing advertisers to coordinate messaging and content throughout the funnel.

The struggle with analyzing audience data is that, historically, there has not been one cohesive view.

Audience performance was fragmented in disparate platforms depending on the channel and, further fragmented at the campaign level. – Read more

Google Analytics: Use Up-to-date Tags for Optimal Reporting

My Post203.jpgGoogle Analytics periodically rolls out new tracking code. To date, the updates have supported:

  • Improved data collection methods, such as asynchronous tracking, which was included in a 2009 update. The “ga.js” tag could be placed at the top of all pages. It improved not only tracking but also load speed.
  • Enhanced data collection, such as Universal Analytics, which was rolled out in 2013. The “analytics.js” tag supported cross-device tracking, advanced segments, and custom dimensions and metrics.
  • Multiple products in Google Marketing Platform, such as the Global Site Tag — “gtag.js” — which represents the most recent tag. Global Site Tag was launched in 2017.

The updates present a challenge to ensure the latest tags are installed. They also present an opportunity: getting robust data and reports that help drive your business. – read more

 

How to Set Up Goals in Google Analytics

My Post135.jpgCreating a New Goal

Once you’ve signed into Google Analytics, click Admin, then choose the view you want. From there, look at the View column, and click Goals.

To create a new goal, click +NEW GOAL. You can also choose to import a goal from the gallery, or to click on an existing target to edit it. If the +NEW GOAL or Import options are not visible, it’s because you’ve already created the maximum 20 goals for the current view.

You have three options for creating goals:

  • Use a template.
  • Create a custom goal.
  • Create a smart goal.

To determine if your business is on the right track for growth, it’s important to set goals – but perhaps what’s even more important is making sure you have systems in place that will help you track your progress toward achieving those goals. Thanks to Google Analytics, it’s relatively easy to set and follow goal progress directly from within your dashboard.

To create, edit, and share goals in Google Analytics, you must have Edit permission at the View level in the account you’re working with. If you do not, speak to the administrator of your account to have those enabled.

Using a Template to Create a New Goal

Choose a Template from the list, and click Next to complete the Goal setup. Templates are included within Google Analytics on an industry basis. If your account does not have an industry category selected, you won’t see this option. Once you choose your industry, you can see a list of available templates to use for goal creation.

Creating a Custom Goal

Choose Custom from the list of options, click Next Step, then select the Type of Goal, and click Next to continue setting up your goal.

There are several types of goals:

  • Destination goals
  • Duration goals
  • Event goals
  • Pages/Screens per session

Read more

How to Find Bigger AND Better Audiences to Reach Using Google Analytics

My Post150.jpgTypically, when I kick off a display or YouTube campaign, I try and start out as specific as possible.

First, my targeting usually leans towards remarketing, customer match or placements, but many times I cannot use targeting this specific. I might not have a big enough audience for hyper-targeted remarketing. I might not have a large enough email list. Or my placements may not be going to where I thought they would be.

My next step is usually to create my own custom intent and affinity audiences in an attempt to continue my goal of staying as close to my target user as possible. But, eventually, we hit a point where we just flat-out need to expand our reach to get in front of more people. This requires using the broader targeting options we have in Google Ads. So where do you begin?

If you’re looking to grow your awareness, hold off on spending a ton of money on persona studies. Start by using the free data we have in Google Analytics. Here, I’ll share one way I like to dig into the data to find out what targeting options I should be trying out for my awareness campaigns. And I’ll show you how you can use this to broaden your reach, too.

Getting Started with Audience Reports

The Audience reports in Google Analytics can give us a ton of information about a good percentage of our users. (I’ll get to why I didn’t say “all users” really soon. Just hold on a second.) For the sake of this post, I want to focus on just one part of the Audience section, and that is the Insights report. To get there, select “Interests.” Then, click on the “Overview” page.

6 Ways to Set Up Funnels in Google Analytics

My Post138.jpgAnalyzing the customer journey is pivotal to conversion optimization.

But how do you track user journeys in a way that is digestible, visual, and useful?

With funnels, of course! Funnel tracking in Google Analytics is one of the best ways to identify—in detail—where you’re going wrong.

I’ll show you six funnel features in Google Analytics to boost your conversions by understanding where prospects falter in their journey.

But first, let’s define a Google Analytics funnel and explain why it matters.

What are Google Analytics funnels, and why are they important?
Website users take specific paths from start to finish, and every site has a goal for its visitors. Google Analytics funnels track this journey so that you can optimize your website and ensure visitors hit your goals.

For example, when prospects land on your homepage, you may want them to:

  • Navigate to the category page.
  • Visit a specific product page.
  • Add an item to their cart.
  • View their cart.
  • Make a purchase.
  • See the confirmation page.

By analyzing how visitors browse your site, you can optimize their experience. For example, a funnel analysis that shows a high exit rate on product category pages suggests that visitors aren’t finding what they want, which could be because product filtering is clunky or unhelpful.

Ultimately, your goal is to increase conversions. Analytics funnels help you home in on the exact stage in the journey that’s causing the most dropouts.

Before we proceed to the types of Google Analytics funnels, we need to understand the difference between strict and flexible funnels. – Read more

How to Use Google Analytics to Boost Traffic

My Post136.jpgGoogle Analytics can be intimidating.

Maybe you’re one of those people who log in, see your website traffic stats and then leave — everything else is all too complicated to understand. If you are, you’re not alone. In fact, 80 percent of retailers are using Google Analytics incorrectly.
But don’t give up on Google Analytics just yet. Even though it might be overwhelming now, with just a few tips I can show you how to use Google Analytics to increase your website traffic by leaps and bounds. You don’t need to be a tech wiz to implement these strategies that will grow your website visitors from a minuscule amount into a gigantic crowd.
Get ready to learn how to use your website stats to your advantage, here’s how to use Google Analytics to boost traffic.

Look at SEO queries and landing page reports.

To identify “loopholes” in your website where you can increase organic traffic, you need to look at SEO queries and landing page reports. First, though, you need to connect Google Analytics with your Google Webmaster Tools account.
Once these two accounts are connected, you’ll be able to see the top SEO queries for your website that are getting the highest impressions on search engines. Although these results are getting high impressions, they may not be getting high click-through rates.
Look at the SEO report on Google Analytics to see keyword ranking, clicks, and impressions.

Read more

5 Useful SEO Insights You Can Learn from Google Analytics

My Post134.jpgYou can gain a tremendous amount of SEO and marketing insights from Google Analytics.

These helpful insights can help you to discover what opportunities exist for optimizing the overall performance of your site.

Ranging from engagement metric insights to conversion metrics and more, there is no shortage of knowledge to be gained.

Check out five of these actionable insights you can learn from Google Analytics and see how you may be able to apply them to improve your SEO.

1. Custom Segments

Custom segments have been a key feature of Google Analytics for a while, allowing you to see traffic by channel, visitors who completed goals, demographic data, and much more.

Custom segments can be created from almost any facet of user data, including time on site, visits to specific pages, visitors who completed a goal, visitors from a specific location and more.

Using segments helps you learn more about the users on your site and how they engage with it.

One insightful area to explore when determining additional segments to create is in the Audience tab of Google Analytics.

If you navigate to Audience > Interests > Overview, the Overview will display a high-level look at three interests reports:

  • Affinity Categories.
  • In-Market Segments.
  • Other Categories.

In the below example, you’ll see that almost 4 percent of visitors are Shoppers or Value Shoppers and almost 4 percent of users also work or have an interest in business marketing services. – Read more