An in-depth look at the importance of bounce rate

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A good user experience results in a low bounce rate. Here is an in-depth look at the bounce rate and what companies can do to reduce theirs.

Bounce rate is a metric that helps determine a webpage’s strength. Bounce rate is shown in a number of different Google Analytics reports and is often used by webmasters to determine whether the content of a page satisfies the intent of the user.

Primarily, companies want their website to have low bounce rates. A good user experience results in a low bounce rate. Here is an in-depth look at the bounce rate and what companies can do to reduce theirs.

Bounces Kill Search Ranking
You may have spent a lot of time and money ranking your web site with national SEO techniques but if users click on your listing on Google and then bounce back to Google that clearly shows a search engine that you should not rank for a query.

User engagement and behavior on a site can increase bounce rates and drop ranking very quickly. Google has the goal of returning the best possible search results possible to fulfill queries. Happy search users will continue using their search engine. But bounces show search engines that a query was not solved or that a site returned a poor user experience.

What Is Bounce Rate
A bounce rate is a number that shows the number of users that landed on a particular website, but left the page without interacting on it. Companies that use Google Analytics on their websites have access to their bounce rate. The analytics keep track of every option performed on a page.

However, when the server only receives one request from the page, that means that the user left the page without doing anything. The complete formula used to find the bounce rate involves all single page sessions being divided by the total number of sessions. Keep in mind that the bounce rate is only calculated for landing pages. – Read more

 

How AdWords Attribution Can Make Your Marketing Budget More Efficient

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What is AdWords attribution I hear you ask? Well, essentially AdWords attribution can be understood as which of your AdWords campaigns is responsible for your conversions.

The session was hosted by Patrick & Eustace who are attribution experts within Google’s Dublin HQ. They started by giving us an overview of what attribution is and why it is important.

Did you know that more than half of web traffic is now concentrated through mobile devices typically on smartphones? As we are sure you are aware, however, conversions are typically lower on smartphones, well the reason for this may not simply be down to what you would typically assume about mobile devices.

Users will regularly go through on average five interactions before they take the final purchasing decision – these means that users don’t only not convert because of your mobile layout, but can also be down to users being at a different stage on the customer journey, perhaps users came to your landing page while in the research stage for example. 75% of adults online will start an activity on one device but finish on another. This means your traditional attribution to conversions model may be out of date – maybe you are just tracking conversion down to the last campaign a user interacts with as opposed to the journey in its totality, this is wrong and may be leading to wasted marketing spend!

This is where AdWords attribution comes into play, there are a variety of options in terms of how you attribute your conversions that can be used to give a clearer picture and using “ last click” or “first click” attribution is to be discouraged if you want to identify which campaign is contributing what value to your final conversions. – Read more

Understanding Website User Engagement with Google Analytics Metrics

My Post (38).jpg15 seconds. The amount of time that most users spend on a website and the amount of time you have to capture your audience’s attention. So how do you know whether users are engaged, and what can you do to increase user engagement on your website?

Most marketers use Google Analytics to track the performance of their website overall, but not all are leveraging the data to glean insights into user engagement. The following metrics are key to benchmarking, tracking, and improving your website engagement. Here’s what they mean and what to do to increase engagement.

Average session duration
Think of a session as a visit. Average session duration is the average amount of time your visitors spend looking around your site. Each user can have multiple sessions or visits that all factor in, and so more frequent users will weigh more heavily when it comes to this metric. Industry experts have differing opinions on this, but anything above 1.5 minutes is considered a good average session duration.

Generally, sites with higher average session duration feature longer scrolling pages with interactivity throughout. Interaction can come in many forms, such as infographics that can be manipulated by the user, animated blocks of content, “lazy-loading” content that populates as you scroll down the page are just a few examples.

Average session duration is a broad metric that can give you a snapshot of your site’s engagement. Pairing it with the following metrics can shed more insight into what you might be able to do to increase time spent on your site. – Read more

What Search Marketers Need to Know About Attribution in 2019

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Biddable media is highly technology-driven.

That’s why it’s so awesome, but also why it’s so confusing at times.

To really excel in this industry, you need to know what to ignore and what to pay attention to.

This is certainly the case when it comes to attribution.

In this post, I’d like to give you a helping hand in the filtering process, based on my own company’s research into this issue.

I’m going to focus on attribution from a paid search perspective. So naturally, I’ll be talking about attribution models within Google Ads, and Google Analytics.

I’ll also consider a few independent analytics companies’ approaches to attribution, and finally the newcomer, Facebook Attribution.

I am not attempting to seriously critique any of the software referred to in this post. My aim is to provide guidance on the right questions to ask about attribution this year. – Read more

What is attribution modeling?

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Everything you need to know about attribution, including its benefits and limitations.

Understanding the steps a customer takes before converting can be just as valuable to marketers as the sale itself. Attribution models are used to assign credit to touchpoints in the customer journey.

For example, if a consumer bought an item after clicking on an display ad, it’s easy enough to credit that entire sale to that one display ad. But what if a consumer took a more complicated route to purchase? She might have initially clicked on the company’s display, then clicked on a social ad a week later, downloaded the company app, then visited the website from an organic search listing and and converted in-store using a coupon in the mobile app. These days, that’s a relatively simple path to conversion.

Attribution aims to help marketers get a better picture of when and how various marketing channels play contribute to conversion events. That information can then be used to inform future budget allocations.

Attribution models

Following are several of the most common attribution models.

  • Last-click attribution. With this model, all the credit goes to the customer’s last touchpoint before converting. This one-touch model doesn’t take into consideration any other engagements the user may with the company’s marketing efforts leading up to that last engagement.
  • First-click attribution. The other one-touch model, first-click attribution, gives 100 percent of the credit to the first action the customer took on their conversion journey. It ignores any subsequent engagements the customer may have had with other marketing efforts before converting.
  • Linear attribution. This multi-touch attribution model gives equal credit to each touchpoint along the user’s path.
  • Time decay attribution. This model gives the touchpoints that occured closer to the time of the conversion more credit than touchpoints further back in time. The closer in time to the event, the more credit a touchpoint receives.
  • U-shaped attribution. The first and last engagement get the most credit and the rest is assigned equally to the touchpoints that occured in between. In Google Analytics, the first and last engagements are each given 40 percent of the credit and the other 20 percent is distributed equally across the middle interactions. – Read more

Here’s why you should take a deep dive into data to optimize your conversions

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A thorough audit of tracking tools can improve your CRO framework because knowing your platform will help you think about how to best use it for your specific business strategy.

So, you got the basics of Conversion Rate Optimization (CRO) and why it’s essential to your marketing strategy. (To recap: a successful CRO framework increase sales and revenue while reducing the cost of paid media.) Great! But how do you get started? There are some general things everyone can focus on to improve their conversion rate, e.g. site speed. But where’s the list of best practices, you may be wondering? The unfortunate reality is that there’s no convenient checklist waiting for you. There’s quite a bit more to CRO than applying a few changes, crossing your fingers and walking away hoping for the best.

Data and analytics inform CRO

Optimizing conversions works on a case-by-case basis. Each brand, site and customer journey is different. There are millions of sites out there with varying needs, goals, traffic, designs, languages. You can’t take what works for one site and apply it to another. Your site should serve a specific purpose; both providing value and addressing the concerns of your visitors at that moment and in the future. Forget instinct: to make any kind of business decision; you need to base your judgment on the evidence. Also known as data. Otherwise, you might be making decisions that could hurt your sales.

Analytics tells you exactly what’s happening on your site, and can then guide you to investigate the bigger picture and find opportunities. Not only does analytics tell you the core journeys and behaviors that give you the best return on investment, but it also highlights friction points and areas where most people leave the website. This saves a lot of time and guesswork, letting you narrow down the improvements that need to be made to optimize conversions. The real power comes when combining this with qualitative research, to delve into the reasoning behind the key objections that result in people leaving… but also why they stay. – Read more

Closing the Loop with Paid Search: Linking the Right Message to the Right Audience

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An End-to-End Approach

Paid search gives advertisers the unique ability to send a large amount of qualified traffic to their web properties with just the flip of a switch. In the world of digital marketing, this is a powerful capability, but the speed with which paid search campaigns can be created can sometimes lead to strategies that overlook the importance of developing a coherent and audience-driven theme into the messaging used in every step of your account’s creation.

That is why it is so important to start every new paid search initiative with a careful consideration of who you will be targeting with your ads, and ultimately, the goals you have in mind for this traffic. By developing a solid understanding of these things, advertisers can begin building end-to-end messaging strategies that seamlessly carry your paid search strategy from your audience to your ads, and finally, through to your targeted landing page.

In this guide, we will walk you through the process of using the end goal of your campaign to reverse engineer your messaging and the audience you will need to leverage in order to support it, along with how you can use this process to develop a more cohesive strategy that maximizes the success you can expect from your paid search initiatives.

Understanding Your Goals

When building a paid search strategy, the first priority should always be to develop a solid understanding of what action you would like to drive on your site and how taking this action can benefit your targeted audience or persona. Are you trying to increase downloads of a gated asset? Perhaps you would like to drive more software demos for your sales team? In any case, take a look at your ultimate goal and put yourself into the shoes of someone who would benefit from taking this action. This will be your targeted persona. Ask yourself how this persona will ultimately benefit from taking this targeted action. Take this process a step further and consider what makes this specific persona unique. Do they have any challenges that your targeted offer helps address? Is there anything that may prevent them from taking action on your site? Using all of this knowledge, you can start to develop how you will target this audience as well as the messaging that you will be using. – Read more

Google Analytics: How to Track PayPal Transactions

My Post (30).jpgMerchants have many options for accepting online payments. “PayPal Payments Standard” is popular, but it can be challenging for Google Analytics to report the sale.

Using PayPal Payments Standard, customers leave the merchant’s website for their account at PayPal. After they complete payment, customers are redirected by PayPal back to the URL provided by the merchant.

There are two issues that can impact reporting in Google Analytics from this process.

First, the customer may not make it back to the merchant’s order confirmation page to trigger ecommerce reporting in Google Analytics. If the return URL is not set properly, the customer may not go back at all or may go back to the merchant’s home page or some other page. None will trigger the Google Analytics ecommerce code. A correct return URL will send the customer back to the order confirmation page, and the Google Analytics ecommerce code fires upon arrival.

This return URL is typically provided by the ecommerce platform in the payment settings. In PayPal, the return URL settings reside behind the gear icon in the top-right after logging in. – Read more

To Get the Most Out of Google Analytics, First Understand What It’s Telling You

My Post (7).jpgArguably the single best free tool available to marketers is Google Analytics. If you know how to use it, it can tell you so much about your customers, how they are using your website, what they’re interested in, and what is causing them issues.

However, no tool is perfect. And no tool can do everything you need it to. Even something as impactful as Google Analytics must come with a few words of warning.

To get the most out of the tool, you have to first understand what it is telling you. And with a tool as powerful as Google Analytics, the biggest fear is in assuming everyone will read the data in the same way.

One Statistic, Multiple Interpretations

Let’s look at an example:

Your team is reviewing the most popular conversion paths on your website and you find that people landing on one specific page are returning to the previous page at a high rate. This is something that Google Analytics can show you quite clearly. You can see the click paths, and so you know where they are coming from and where they are going next.

It’s obvious, in this case, that there is a problem worth correcting. Something about that page is not working. – Read more

Content metrics you need to know

My Post (6).jpgIf you’re producing digital content for your website or social media, then you want to know whether it’s working or not! Here’s our run down of metrics that you should be keeping an eye on.

Why do you need to know about digital marketing metrics?

Unlike offline marketing such as adverts and flyers, digital marketing offers businesses a plethora of in-depth insights into how effective their marketing efforts really are. With every post, like, share, follow or comment data is created that you can use to extend your reach and increase engagement with your brand.

Whether you’re looking to grow your business through organic or paid digital marketing there are a number of key metrics that you really need to know. In this post we’ll be looking at metrics that you can access for free, either via your social channels or via Google Analytics, and because they’re free, there’s no excuse not to be using them!

Website and behaviour

This section looks at how people are behaving on your website. All the information that you need can be found in Google Analytics, if you don’t already have an account set up, make your way over there now and get it done.

Page views

The total number of views a single page has had for any given time period. It’s a pretty basic stat but useful all the same as you can measure/ compare how your pages rank against each other.

If you find a page that stands out as particularly high ranking, or indeed low ranking, it can be an indicator to have a look at what might be working well, or not so well.

Average page time

A measure of how engaging a page is. – Read More