How to use Google Analytics: A beginner’s guide to Google’s service for website-traffic analytics

My Post (25).pngJust the name is intimidating to some people: Google Analytics.

It might help to know that analytics is the name for the branch of mathematics dedicated to analyzing data, and is generally used to tease out meaningful patterns that can be used to generate statistics and make predictions about future trends.

That said, you don’t need to know or perform any math to use Google Analytics— all of that is done in the background for you.

What you can do with Google Analytics

Google Analytics — commonly abbreviated as GA — is a free tool that Google provides to help you understand, analyze, and improve your website traffic. It provides graphs and data that you can use to understand information about your site. Here are just a few examples of the kind of information you can learn using GA:

  • How many unique visitors click on the site and specific pages within it.
  • How many overall page views go to specific pages (and the site in general). Pageviews are different from unique visitors, since the same person might click on a page more than once.
  • How long visitors are spending on each page during their visit.
  • What your “bounce” rate is — in other words, what percentage of your visitors are leaving the site after looking at only a single page, rather than following links to other pages.
  • Information about your visitors’ demographics, including where they are from, and what kind of browser or mobile device they’re using to visit.

It’s important to note that only the site’s owners and managers can see GA data, so strangers, visitors, and competitors cannot, for example, access your Google Analytics page (at least not without your permission or login information).

How to create a Google Analytics account

To get started, you need to create a Google Analytics account for each website you own or manage. – Read more

Where to Place Google Analytic Tags?

My Post - 2019-04-29T114502.355.jpgHow can Google Analytic Tags help you?

If you are looking for a way to learn even more about your online presence, analytical tags are a good way to find out more information about the traffic on your website. By having an analytical tag system on your site you can; see what visitors are clicking on your site, how they got to your site and what they took out of their cart. These tags can be of great value and assistance for all marketing strategies.

Tag you’re IT

Just like you would a childhood friend, attempting to tag something online will have the average person yelling for their IT team. Tags, in the sense of Google Analytics (GA), are bits of code you embed in your websites’ HTML or JavaScript to extract specific information. Tags are now effective tools to help marketing teams find out what users visit their site, for how long and what they are doing online.

Short History of Tag

GA has been the solution for online marketers to collect, process and report online data to create opportunities for improvements. This came with a heavy price tag of working with coders every time you would like to modify a tag or change a monitoring feature. Google Tag Manager (GTM) was released in 2012 in order to let marketers update their tags on their terms. GTM is a tool to easily modify what you want GA to monitor.

What is Google Tag Manager?

GTM is like having the fast kid on your team for a school wide game of freeze tag. This program monitors user interface without having your IT team write new code every time you want to analyze something else. All you have to do is embed the GMT code into each page of your site, thus eliminating the manual process of creating individual tags. Once this is done GMT is able to create, code and embed a new tag; optimizing your marketing process. – Read more

10 Amazing Ways to Harness the Power of PPC Remarketing Campaigns

My Post - 2019-04-18T160632.081.jpgRemarketing is one of the strongest conversion tactics in digital marketing today.

By using artificial intelligence technology, search engines such as Google and Bing allow companies to serve display advertising or standard text ads to previous visitors of their websites.

This form of digital advertising is in a way personalized to each user and is more targeted than even a display ad that targets certain search terms.

The key word in digital remarketing advertising is relevance.

Ads for a company’s products are extremely relevant to a person who has visited that company’s website or browsed that company’s products in the past.

Remarketing is more akin to an ad-filtering program that people may use when they browse the web. It serves the user ads that are relevant to him or her based on his or her past browsing habits.

PPC remarketing is a way to re-engage potential customers who have already demonstrated an interest in a company or product.

It helps you remind these customers of the product, and to entice them to follow through and make the purchase they didn’t make the first time they visited your site.

By using the most advanced forms of digital analytics, remarketing can help companies target customers who, for example, added a product to the online shopping cart but never ended up going through with the purchase.

While digital remarketing generally won’t result in the same click-through rates as standard pay-per-click campaigns, it is a way to reinforce your brand to potential customers who have already expressed an interest in your company.

And since users spend a majority of their time online away from search engines, it’s important to take advantage of Google and Bing’s powerful display ad network that serve ads on sites across the web.

Both Google and Bing offer a plethora of options when it comes to digital remarketing. Here are 10 types of remarketing you can do on their networks. – Read more

4 Steps To Master Google Analytics

My Post - 2019-04-18T155708.896.jpgIf you own a website, then we’re sure you might have used Google Analytics at some point.

To know what works well for your business website and what doesn’t, Google Analytics is the most suitable tool to measure these aspects of your business.

Confused about Google Analytics? Here is the best user guide that explains the basics of Google Analytics. Do you know the best thing about Google Analytics? it’s absolutely free! Additionally, Google has great customer support and service along with detailed content in case you get stuck on a certain issue. Look no further to understand how Google Analytics works, just keep reading!

To dig deep into your website’s performance, you need to understand the basics of Google Analytics. There are numerous benefits of using Google analytics tool. If you haven’t used this fabulous analytics tool, chances are you’re missing out of a lot of valuable information that could help improve your business and business website.

What is a successful website?

A successful website – has great content, is easily accessible and can measure and monitor the activity of users. Thus, if your website is linked with Google Analytics – it is a notch above from the ones that do not.

The reports generated about your website on Google Analytics tell you about the top performing pages and information about the traffic you receive to your website. Google analytics and the growth of the business are closely related. Businesses that consider Google analytics and strategize their plans accordingly are much more successful.

Here are the steps to master Google Analytics:

Create an Account

If you have an account on Google, you need to create an account on Google Analytics. You can do this by simply logging on to analytics.google.com and creating an account using an existing gmail ID.

Once you sign up for the account, you will be greeted with three steps for your Google Analytics account. Once done, you will get the Tracking ID that you need to embed in the website for which you wish to track data. You will get a pop up of the Google Analytics code which needs to be set up on the website. Embedding this tracking code in your website will help you track all the traffic that you receive along with information about its source, target audience, browser information and much more. Most website builders have a designated space where you can embed your tracking Id. For websites build on HTML, you can add the tracking code before the </head> tag. – Read more

Gathering insights in Google Analytics can be as easy as A-B-C

My Post - 2019-04-16T142555.977.jpgToday’s customers are deeply curious, searching high and low for information about a product before making a purchase.

And this curiosity applies to purchases big and small—just consider the fact that mobile searches for “best earbuds” have grown by over 130 percent over the last two years. (Google Data, US, Oct 2015 – Sep 2016 vs. Oct 2017 – Sep 2018. ) To keep up with this curious customer, marketers are putting insights at the center of the strategy so that they can understand customers’ intentions and deliver a helpful, timely experience.

In our new guide about linking Google Analytics and Google Ads, we explore the broad range of reports available in Analytics. These reports give you crucial insights about the customer journey that can then be used to inform your campaigns in Google Ads. Here’s what you should know about the A-B-Cs of reporting.

Acquisition reports

How did your customers end up on your site in the first place? Acquisition reports answer this question, offering insights about how effectively your ads drive users to your site, which keywords and search queries are bringing new users to your site, and much more. This video gives you a quick overview of how Acquisition reports work.  – Read more

Use Google Analytics to Optimize Advertising Spend

My Post - 2019-04-09T111511.102.jpgWhen you think of Google Analytics, what do you think of?

You might think of website metrics, like visits and users. You might think of website usability – bounce rates and time on site. You might even think of goal tracking – transactions and revenue.

Google Analytics does all of that, and more. Which is why it is such a great tool for marketers at companies large and small.

However, most marketers don’t think of Google Analytics as a tool to help you optimize your advertising spend. But it can do that too.

How to Optimize Your Ad Spend with Google Analytics

First, did you know that you can import cost data into your Google Analytics account? You can link your Google Ads account so that all of that data gets pulled in automatically, and then use this article to learn how to add all your other ad spend.

Once you have cost data included in Google Analytics, you can use various ‘Acquisition’ reports to dig into the performance of all your advertising channels. From paid social campaigns like Facebook and Instagram ads, to search ads on Google and Bing, to email marketing and display – you can learn more about how visitors behave on your site when they come through one of these paid channels.

You can see the number of sessions, and calculate the cost for every new visitor to your site. You can see where they go on your site, and how long they stick around. And you can see transactions, including conversion rate, revenue, and cost per transaction. In that way, you can even calculate your return on ad spend (ROAS) for each campaign – that is, how much money is this campaign delivering in revenue for every dollar you spend in advertising.

At this point, you will have a better idea which channels are working and which are not. And you can optimize your budget to spend more in those that are working, and press pause on the campaigns that are not. –  Read more

Using Alerts in Google Analytics for Slow Site Speeds

My Post - 2019-04-05T115447.574I’ve addressed site speed reports in Google Analytics. Site speed is critical for conversions and, increasingly, for search engine rankings.

In this post, I’ll explain how to set up Custom Alerts in Google Analytics to notify site owners of page speed problems.

Site Speed Alerts

The “Custom Alerts” configuration section in Google Analytics is behind the gear icon in the lower left of any page and under the “View” column.

To create a new alert, click Custom Alerts > New Alert.

For this example, I will create an alert via email and text if my home page for mobile takes greater than 10 seconds to load, on average, on any day. Here are the steps.

  1. Assign a name to the custom alert.
  2. Apply the alert to one or more Google Analytics views.
  3. Select “Day” as the period, so it notifies for all days.
  4. Select to be notified by email, text, or both.

Google Analytics offers limited alert conditions by default. There’s no way to select multiple conditions, such as home page only and mobile only. – Read more

4 Reasons Why We Need Voice Search Analytics Now

My Post - 2019-04-02T114628.141Most of us already know that voice search is a “thing” and it continues to grow in popularity and importance.

Voice search is here to stay.

The growth of voice search in 2019 continues, even as traditional desktop an mobile searches remain strong.

However, traditional search is starting to have to share a piece of the pie as an increasing number of voice search options are gaining a strong presence.

Based on some research, there is more than enough evidence to show that this type of search will continue to grow and become more prominent over the years to come.

Marketers will need to become more prepared to adjust their digital strategies around this. A few stats:

  • 50 percent of all searches will be voice searches by 2020.
  • 57 percent of smart home speaker owners have made a purchase using their device.
  • 24 percent of smart home speaker owners use their device nearly every day, while 29 percent use it several times a day.

However, although we know voice search queries are growing by the number and in importance, the caveat is there is no solidified way for marketers to track analytics around voice search, yet.

Voice search is really just a keyword, fired through a different medium. But there are no robust reporting platforms out there covering it. – Read more

How to Streamline Reporting with Google Tag Manager & Google Analytics

My Post - 2019-03-25T153017.980.jpgOne area that seems to elude many digital marketers is the relationship between conversion tracking and website analytics.

Often, when businesses get started with online advertising, they have established each piece of the puzzle separately, with Google Analytics monitoring site traffic, and paid channels (like Facebook and Google Ads) tracking conversions individually within their respective dashboards.

This set-up may be effective on a small scale, but it will inevitably cause issues when your efforts expand. Having the proper tracking to view granular paid channel performance in Google Analytics will allow you to add another layer of attribution to hold each channel accountable for what’s really happening on your website.

In addition to Analytics, Google offers tools to streamline the process of managing website pixels and conversion tracking for each channel. With the combination of clean conversion tracking and reliable analytics, you should be able to scale your paid programs without having to worry about whether the information you’re looking at is accurate.

In this post, I’ll walk you through how to use Google Tag Manager and Google Analytics to improve your paid channel performance reporting in four steps. – Read more

An in-depth look at the importance of bounce rate

My Post (57).jpg

A good user experience results in a low bounce rate. Here is an in-depth look at the bounce rate and what companies can do to reduce theirs.

Bounce rate is a metric that helps determine a webpage’s strength. Bounce rate is shown in a number of different Google Analytics reports and is often used by webmasters to determine whether the content of a page satisfies the intent of the user.

Primarily, companies want their website to have low bounce rates. A good user experience results in a low bounce rate. Here is an in-depth look at the bounce rate and what companies can do to reduce theirs.

Bounces Kill Search Ranking
You may have spent a lot of time and money ranking your web site with national SEO techniques but if users click on your listing on Google and then bounce back to Google that clearly shows a search engine that you should not rank for a query.

User engagement and behavior on a site can increase bounce rates and drop ranking very quickly. Google has the goal of returning the best possible search results possible to fulfill queries. Happy search users will continue using their search engine. But bounces show search engines that a query was not solved or that a site returned a poor user experience.

What Is Bounce Rate
A bounce rate is a number that shows the number of users that landed on a particular website, but left the page without interacting on it. Companies that use Google Analytics on their websites have access to their bounce rate. The analytics keep track of every option performed on a page.

However, when the server only receives one request from the page, that means that the user left the page without doing anything. The complete formula used to find the bounce rate involves all single page sessions being divided by the total number of sessions. Keep in mind that the bounce rate is only calculated for landing pages. – Read more