How To Double Your Ad Budget

Todays post is packed full of actionable items.  Grab a coffee and pull up a chair, and let’s jump right in!

I’ve written before about the importance of advertising goals, so I won’t dwell on them again too much, suffice it to say, every ad campaign you run should have a specific goal you can measure its performance against.

This activity is most often referred to as conversion tracking.  In the simplest terms a conversion can be thought of as a sale, but can also be more abstract, such as a website visitor, PDF download, or even calling a number from (yes you can even track calls on a number from a specific ad campaign….).

OK, so it’s pretty obvious how important conversion tracking is to ALL advertisers.  If you don’t know what your ads are doing, how do you know you’re not wasting your money?  So the next few stats might come as a surprise to you.

  1. Research conducted across 2,000 google advertisers last year revealed that 42% weren’t tracking what their ads were doing at all. The (so if your know what your ads are doing, you’re already ahead of 40% of your competitors)
     
  2. Worse still, of the remaining 58% that had conversion tracking, more than 50% had broken or faulty tracking on their campaigns (might want to quickly check if the pat on the back you just gave yourself was justified)
     
  3. Of the remaining ads with tracking that worked, less than 40% of ads reported a single conversion. (Yes that’s right, 60% of their ad spend was wasted)

Now the 3 steps needed to double your ad budget? 

  1. First you need to go on a quick journey.  Click on your ads and follow the path they lead you down.  Then review the conversion tracking to make sure it’s all working as it should.
    (this should be all accessible in your google analytics).  
     
  2. Next you need to review your campaigns for the last 180 days.  Stop running the ads which show low or no conversions. (on average this will be 60%+ of your spend over the last 6 months)
     
  3. Take that spare (more than double) advertising budget and apply it to the ad campaigns that have shown conversions over the same 180 day period (most campaigns are capped by budget rather than results)

So in summary…..

At the very least this email will have confirmed you deserve an A+ for conversion tracking! 

Hopefully for everyone else, I’ve helped you identify a big fat saving which you can now apply to the ads which are working.  Not only does this mean you stop wasting money, it means you can actually increase the return youre getting from your good campaigns  That’s much more than just doubling your ad budget.  Its doubling your profitable ad budget!

As always if you’d like to discuss any of your PPC or Email marketing campaigns over a Zoom call, you can book some time with us via the following link.

3 Facebook Ad Ideas to Get Your Content Seen by Your ‘Perfect’ Audience

You have countless ways to promote your content online, but one of the most effective is Facebook ads.

With over 1.8 billion daily active users, you can almost guarantee your audience is there. You just need to learn how to get your content in front of them.

Given a Facebook post’s organic reach is in the single digits, your time is best spent making the advertising side work for your content.

In this guide, I detail three of my most effective ways to promote content using Facebook advertising (without ever touching that boost button.)

1. Create a “content bucket” campaign to reach new fans

Many content creators are focused on more. They want more fans, more readers/listeners/viewers. With that in mind, focus first on growing your audience by reaching people who are unfamiliar with your brand or your brand’s content – but who would be interested in your topic.

My “content bucket” campaign idea works so you don’t have to spend too much time creating big Facebook campaigns for every piece of content you publish.

The concept is simple: You create one campaign. Every time you publish a new piece of content, add it to that campaign.

Let me walk through how to set this up: Head into your Facebook ads manager and click on “create new campaign.”

Pick an objective based on the content. If it’s a Facebook video, pick video views. If it’s a blog, podcast, YouTube video, or other non-Facebook content, select traffic. – Read more

#FacebookAds 

Why and How You Should Use Google Ads for Your SEO Campaign

Running an SEO campaign is a significant investment of time and resources. There are a lot of on-site factors that you have to get right. It’s a lot of work, and you can never be 100% sure if it was worth the investment until your content is ranking on the front page of the search results.

This guide will discuss how you can utilize Google Ads to test a page before you embark on a costly long-term SEO campaign. Read on to learn more about Google Ads and how to take advantage of the platform to support your next SEO campaign.

1. Test the potential SEO ROI

When you run an SEO campaign, you have a goal in mind. Generally, the goal of getting a piece of content or a page to rank in the search results is one of the following:

  1. Customer Acquisition: directly sell a product or service to visitors.
  2. Lead Acquisition: generate a lead onto an owned marketing channel. For example, grow your email list.
  3. Brand Awareness: make potential customers aware of your product/services.

Most companies will run an SEO campaign based on the assumption that ranking for a particular keyword will help them achieve one of these goals. Running a Google Ads campaign allows you to gather data relatively cheaply to test those first two goals.

Through a PPC campaign, you can test how your page converts visitors into sales. You can check the conversion rate onto your email list easily as well.

The data you collect from a PPC campaign will not perfectly reflect what you’ll see from having a piece of content ranking on the first page of Google. The conversion rates will likely differ, and the volume of clicks you receive will not be the same. However, you can gain plenty of valuable insights that can help you decide if it’s worth running a campaign focused on certain keywords.

2. Gain on-page engagement insights

Google wants to provide people who use their service with a great user experience. The more people use their service, the more money they make from paid ads.

Google has mastered the art of providing a great user experience. How people engage with your content is a critical factor that impacts where content should rank in the search results. You can use Google Ads to gain insights into bounce rate, time on page, and other user experience signals that impact SEO. – Read more

How to Optimize Facebook Lead Ads for Success: Guide for 2021

Facebook lead ads are one of the most powerful lead generation techniques out there.

Not only do they help you learn more about your audience, but they also help you to connect with them, and even make sales.

But despite this potential, Facebook advertising can easily drain your budget and fail to deliver a return on investment if it isn’t done with purpose. This is why it’s important to forget about ‘pay and spray’ strategies and optimize your Facebook lead ads for success.

In this best practice guide, we’ll show you how to improve your Facebook lead ads to make sure they’re achieving your goals, and we’ll share some of our most successful lead ads examples.

When it comes to Facebook ads optimization 2021, look no further than these tips to set you on the right path.

Facebook lead ads basics

If you’re reading this blog, you probably already know—or think you know—how to make Facebook lead ads.

But if your Facebook lead ads aren’t working as well as they should, then you’ll need to take a step back to the basics.

Optimizing Facebook advertising is not as simple as improving on what’s there. It involves taking a step right back to examine the goals that made you create the campaign in the first place.

Lead ads are good for the following marketing objectives:

  • Lead generation techniques: Capture customer details like email address and phone number to use for promotional purposes.
  • Market research: Simply ask your audience anything you want to know about them – directly. Offer them a valuable incentive in exchange for the info.
  • Customer feedback: One of the best ways to collect feedback is directly from your audience. Lead ads are an excellent method.

As you can see, while Facebook lead ads could potentially be used to increase sales and promotions, the main purpose is to get more personal with your audience in-platform.

If you’re not getting the results you want, it’s time to re-examine your goals and purpose. – Read more

#FacebookAdvertising

How to Make a Great Facebook Ad (With Examples)

There is so much content flying around on the internet that it’s challenging for brands to stand out through all the noise. When you post something, you never know if it’s reaching the right audience at the right time.

If only there were a way to reach people with characteristics of your ideal audience across a platform that hasover 2.7 billion users.

Oh wait, there is.

Facebook is no longer just a tool for seeing what your grandma is up to. (She’s doing fine BTW; she won $18 at bingo yesterday.) Facebook ads are a goldmine for marketers—if they’re used strategically

How Do Facebook Ads Work?

Facebook ads work by cutting through the noise and showing your ad on Facebook users’ news feeds. Based on Facebook’s database of profiles and the targeting parameters you set, Facebook will serve your ad to someone who fits your target audience. 

There are four main elements that make up a Facebook ad:

  • Title: This is the name of the ad campaign.
  • Visual: The still image, video, or carousel of images you want to display.
  • Copy: The written text alongside your visual.
  • Call To Action (CTA): What you’re inviting the audience to do (and the page where they land).

The ads tool also includes a variety of audience segmentation features. You can target by the traditional demographics such as age or location. You can dive in even further to get more specific characteristics such as level of education, job title, or income. 

(Currently running an ad that’s targeting millionaire ice cream taste testers. We just want to talk… and learn. 👀)

The magic is in the customization. With a database this huge and enough data to drill down to a hyper-specific group of people, Facebook makes sure you’re reaching your target audience and routing them to your site

What to Keep in Mind When Making an FB Ad

“Nothing successful ever came from a strategy with no goal,” said every marketer ever.

Before you run off and launch a campaign, you want to establish what your goals are.

Facebook Ads Manager allows marketers to choose one of three goals for their ad. The goals represent three different stages within the sales funnel:

  • Awareness: These ads let people know your brand exists and that you’re an option to solve their problems. Facebook optimizes these campaigns to reach as many people as possible. 
  • Engagement: These ads generate interest and preference with people who are already aware of you. Facebook will optimize these campaigns for the engagement metrics you define. 
  • Conversions: Conversion ads give viewers who are already interested that final boost to convert. Facebook optimizes these campaigns to convert as much as possible. 

You’ll also want to clearly define who your target audience will be. Blasting your content to anyone and everyone isn’t as beneficial as you’d think. The more carefully you define your audience, the more likely you are to choose the targeting parameters that help your ads reach them. 

Here are some of the options you can choose when defining your audience in Facebook Ads Manager: – Read more

#FacebookAdvertising

9 Proven Landing Page Best Practices to Get More Conversions

Following these landing page best practices is the key to a high converting landing page.

You sit down at your desk fired up and ready to create a killer landing page. No doubt, this page is the thing that will make your email list sprout faster than flowers in May.

You stare at a blank canvas, willing the words flow through your keyboard.

But all you see is a blank screen.

You know a landing page can be a powerful marketing tool for your business or side hustle, but getting started from scratch can feel daunting. 

Thankfully, having some tried-and-true landing page best practices to follow will help you overcome the blank screen to create a landing page that converts visitors to subscribers without hesitation.

Read on for 9 tips, tricks and landing page best practices to help you create a high-converting landing page.

1 – Write a benefit-focused headline 

A headline is the first thing a visitor sees, so you need to make sure it grabs their attention from the get go. The value you offer needs to be immediately clear — after all, visitors need to know what’s in it for them if they’re going to sign up or buy from you. 

In fact, a great headline could be the difference between your visitors reading on or exiting your page. 

Approximately 80% of your visitors will read your headline, but only 20% will read the rest.

Our advice? Spend more time writing your headline than you do the rest of your page. Test different headlines to see which works best.

Check out the example below from JB Fit. See how she uses a benefit-driven headline to draw people in. – Read more

#EmailMarketing #LandingPages


What Are Search Terms (and How to Find Them)

Every time you type a phrase into your search engine, you’re using a search term. Search terms help grab attention and boost your SEO with keywords, but search terms are not considered keywords.

We’ll explore what search terms are and why they’re important to your marketing strategy. We’ll also show you how you can use the Semrush tool to find search terms to target with organic and paid search strategies.

Why Do You Need To Research Search Terms?

Search terms commonly use one or two keywords. You’ll want to rank for a keyword that’s used in many search terms.

Search terms also indicate a customer’s search intent. Search intent gives us an idea of the kind of content Google will show in the search results.

If your website targets a certain search intent, then knowing what search terms are used will add to the likelihood your website will pop up first on the SERP. Additionally, understanding what terms people are using when searching can save you a lot of money on your PPC campaigns.

Once you have researched a variety of search terms, and have isolated the keyword you want to target, make sure you have that keyword in all the important locations like your webpage’s meta description, page title, and H1 tags.

Before you jump into finding search terms with keyword research, check out our guide to using the Semrush tool for keyword research. – Read more

#SearchTerms

Retargeting Ads That Will Bring Your Audience Back

You know that one ad you keep seeing: The one for that embarrassing t-shirt your friend messaged you about that just couldn’t be real? (It was. Yikes!)

Your curiosity got the best of you for one second, and now that cringe-worthy tee is following you around, cozying up next to your cousin’s baby announcement on Facebook, and squeezing in between your friend’s selfies on IG. 

Experiences like this can make you think that retargeting ads—those ads that resurface products and services you looked at but didn’t take action on—are too pushy and sales-y to be worth including in your marketing strategy. (Nobody wants to be that type of marketer.)

But the truth is that most people kinda like retargeted ads—when they’re well-targeted. 

We’re pleasantly surprised when that book we meant to buy shows up in an ad next to our favorite sports column or when a social ad lets us know that a previously sold-out concert tour has added some new dates. 

Because let’s face it: The internet can be distracting. It’s easy to close the wrong tab, run to read a new email while browsing, or open up a Slack notification before you hit “check out.” 

A well-targeted reminder helps consumers as well as businesses. For example, data shows that retargeting ads can yield a 10x increase in click-through rates (CTR) since users are already familiar with the brand or product.

Since only 2% of web traffic converts, it’s worth seeing if some well-planned and well-placed retargeting ads can help bring those almost-ready-to-buy prospects back into your world.

What Is Retargeting, Really?

Retargeting is a powerful form of PPC advertising that leverages tracking technology to identify individuals who have previously engaged with your brand in some way and serves them ads on a variety of platforms to try to re-engage them. – Read more

#Unbounce

What Is Last Click Attribution and How to Use It

Last Click Attribution Model

In this blog post, we’ll cover all things last click attribution including how it’s defined, what makes it unique, how your marketing team can use it, and more.

What is last click attribution?

A last click attribution model is when you give all of the credit for a conversion to the last touchpoint in the buyer’s journey — it assumes the final touchpoint is what ultimately influenced the lead’s decision to convert.

Pros and Cons of Last Click Attribution

Last click attribution is helpful if you want to know which of your marketing channels and touchpoints have the most influence in the final stage of the buyer’s journey.

While this is helpful information, it doesn’t account for the numerous other channels and touchpoints that impacted a customer from the very start of the buyer’s journey. This is important to note since there are a variety of touchpoints, across numerous channels, that impact a lead throughout the buyer’s journey — which is why most marketers today refrain from only using last click attribution. Rather, they’ll use multi-touch attribution or include last-click as part of their other marketing attribution efforts.

For instance, say a lead received an email from your email campaign, clicked through to your website, read a blog post, and then decided they wanted to buy your product. Well, last click attribution would only account for that last touchpoint — the blog post. Meanwhile, the other touchpoints throughout the buyer’s journey that contributed to this lead’s decision are dismissed.

That’s why multi-touch attribution has become such a popular attribution model among today’s marketers. Multi-touch attribution accounts for all of these touchpoints and channels and assigns them credit based on their influence.

In addition to last click and multi-touch attribution, you may have heard of first click attribution.

First Click vs. Last Click Attribution

FIrst click attribution differs from last click attribution because it assigns all of the credit for a conversion to the first touchpoint or channel (e.g. interaction on your website or with a marketing campaign) that a customer had before a conversion.

First click attribution is helpful if you want to know which of your marketing efforts are generating initial traffic in the awareness stage of the buyer’s journey.

Similar to last click attribution, this is a helpful attribution method on a small scale — combining it with other attribution methods is recommended in order to get a clear picture of your marketing attribution efforts.

Now, let’s talk about how your marketing team can use last click attribution.

How to Create a Last Click Attribution Report

If you choose to create a standalone last click attribution report, you’ll likely find yourself using an attribution tool.

If you already use an attribution tool, there’s a chance it has a specific report that focuses solely on the last click. There’s also a chance that it offers customizable attribution reports which would also allow you to create a last click report.

Either way, here are a few available options for your consideration as you look to create marketing attribution reports of your own. – Read more

#Advertising

How to Decrease Landing Page Bounce Rate & Capture More Email Addresses

How to Decrease Landing Page Bounce Rate & Capture More Email Addresses

Bounce rate.

It’s one of the metrics you must keep tabs on as you run your digital marketing campaigns.

And if you’re running a lead generation campaign, your landing page bounce rate is one of the most important metrics to track. That’s because if your bounce rate is high, you won’t capture as many email addresses as you should. 

That’s why you must know how to decrease your landing page bounce rate.

What is Landing Page Bounce Rate (And Why is it Important)?

Just to be on the same page, a bounce can be defined as a visitor who arrives on one of your web pages and leaves without taking any action or clicking through to subsequent pages.

Therefore, a landing page bounce rate can be defined as the percentage of people who arrive on your landing page and leave without converting. 

For the purpose of our topic today, a conversion is opting in for the offer on your landing page. 

For example, if 20 people arrive on your landing page and only 5 submit their contact details, your landing page bounce rate would be 75%.

By implementing landing page best practices, you can decrease your bounce rate and capture more email addresses.

8 Strategies for Decreasing Your Landing Page Bounce Rate

Decreasing your landing page bounce rates is one of the first steps to landing page optimization. That’s because as your bounce rates drop, your conversions enjoy a lift.

So, let’s quickly look at eight strategies to help you decrease your landing page bounce rates so you can capture more email addresses

1. Understand Your Target Audience

Decreasing your landing page bounce rates starts way before you design your landing page. It begins with you conducting audience research. – Read more