Google Keyword Searches with the Lowest and Highest Competition

Google Keyword Searches with the Lowest and Highest Competition

To find niche opportunities in transactional keywords, we reviewed our database of 20 billion queries for the lowest competition Google keyword searches filtered by keyword modifiers. The aim was to uncover untapped opportunities for a long-tail strategy.

We also reviewed high competition terms that could offer an insight into buyer psychology and behavior as a starting point for a more high-level keyword strategy.

If you want to try searching for transactional keywords in your niche, use the modifiers from the tables of data below, in combination with your seed keywords in the Keyword Research Toolkit or Google Keyword Planner.

Low Competition Google Keyword Searches for Transactional Queries

High competition keywords may be considered valuable, but the other end of the scale is where you can find some of the best opportunities. Combine the strength of several low competition keywords and you may end up with a solid long-tail strategy that can deliver significant quick wins.

Low Competition Google Keyword Searches for Transactional Queries

High competition keywords may be considered valuable, but the other end of the scale is where you can find some of the best opportunities. Combine the strength of several low competition keywords and you may end up with a solid long-tail strategy that can deliver significant quick wins. – Read more

#KeywordSearches

Facebook Ads vs. Google Ads: Which is Better for Your Brand?

Facebook Ads vs. Google Ads: Which is Better for Your Brand?

If you’re reading this article, it’s likely because you’re considering running digital ads.

You’ve heard about Facebook Ads and Google Ads but you’re still unclear on the difference between the two platforms.

In this article, we’ll cover each platform’s unique features, the key differences to keep in mind, and the factors to consider when deciding which ad platform to use.

Let’s get started.

What is the difference between Facebook Ads and Google Ads?

Facebook Ads is an advertising platform used for paid social campaigns on Facebook while Google Ads run search and display ads. While they both run pay-per-click (PPC) ads, they do so on separate channels and often target users at different stages in the buyer’s journey.

These platforms are often pitted against each other but in fact, Facebook Ads and Google Ads are complementary, each offering unique benefits to marketers.

If your team can only focus on one, there are a few things you’ll want to consider.

Your Campaign Goal

What do you want to accomplish with your campaign? Is it brand awareness, leads, sales, or something else? Knowing this answer can already steer you in the right direction.

Google Ads is ideal for demand capture – meaning reaching users who have high purchase intent. For instance, if I’m looking up the keyword “water bottle,” this may signal an interest in purchasing one.

With that in mind, the ads below align well with search intent and can lead to sales.

Google search ad example

Facebook Ads, on the other hand, is ideal for reaching consumers who are near the top of the funnel, (i.e., great for brand and product awareness). – Read more

#GoogleAds #FacebookAds

Local is now digital: Understanding the new local shopper

Local is now digital: Understanding the new local shopper

COVID-19 has fundamentally changed how consumers shop worldwide; they rely more on the Internet to research and discover products to buy. For example, search interest for products like the “best exercise bikes,” “best ring lights” and “best air fryers” increased by 100% or more in the last year. To make it easier for consumers to discover top products and the best places to buy them, Google launched the Best Things for Everything Guide.

We’ve seen that shoppers don’t just turn to Google for things they want to buy on the web; they also use Google to find what they need nearby. Over the past year, we’ve seen a significant increase in commercial intent across Google including Google Search, Google Maps and YouTube.

Finding what’s nearby on Google Search

Whether it’s to support small businesses in their community or ensure a nearby store has the item they need in stock, consumers are using Google Search to thoughtfully research their shopping trips in advance. 

  • Searches for “local” + “business(es)” have grown by more than 80% year over year, including searches like “local businesses near me” and “support local businesses.”
  • Searches for “who has” + “in stock” have grown by more than 8,000% year over, including searches like “who has nintendo switch in stock” and “who has gym equipment in stock.”
Icon of a blue rising arrow over a store icon. Text says: "Searches for "who has" + "in stock" have grown by over 8000% year over year in the U.S.

Beyond retail searches, we’ve seen an increase in online research before heading out to a restaurant or to get takeout. At Google, we recently found that:

  • Two out of three dining consumers said they used search to find food and beverage information during the pandemic.
  • Fifty-seven percent of dining consumers said they discovered food and beverage information during the pandemic via online ads.

Exploring new products on YouTube

YouTube has become a critical part of not just the shopping process, but the local shopping process too. In a recent U.S. Google/Talkshoppe study, we found that:

  • Forty-five percent of viewers say they watch YouTube to see a product demo before buying.
  • Viewers say they are 2x more likely to go in-store or online to buy something they saw on YouTube versus the competitive average.

Starting their journey on Google Maps

Google Maps has become a more critical part of the local user experience, as people use Maps to explore something they’re interested in, versus just for navigation: – Read more

4 Key Reasons Local Businesses Fail When Using Google AdWords

If you’ve tried Google AdWords and had little to no success, find out what you could have doing wrong.

The following excerpt is from Perry Marshall’s book Ultimate Guide to Local Business Marketing

Perry Marshall and lead generation expert Talor Zamir introduce you to the basic framework behind a successful local marketing campaign. In this edited excerpt, Perry and Zamir offer four reasons why your Google AdWords campaign may be failing.

You’ve likely heard other business owners trashing Google AdWords as expensive, complicated, and ineffective. Good, let them! That just means there’ll be less competition for you.

AdWords does get a bad rap in many circles, and while clicks are expensive for most people and the interface complex, most of the time when advertisers get bad results, they only have themselves (or those they hire to manage their campaigns) to blame.

There are four main reasons local businesses fail with Google AdWords. Let’s cover them briefly here so you know what you’re in for.

1. No landing page or an awful landing page.

The first page a visitor to your site lands on after clicking on your Google ad is called the landing page. A landing page is an essential part of your AdWords campaign, and a good one can instantly double your leads from AdWords (without spending a penny more on clicks).

I recently clicked on an ad for a family law attorney. You’d think that would lead me to a site about family law, but instead, their home page was all about personal injury law. That’s not what I was looking for. Plus, it was an old, ugly-looking site that made it hard for me to find any information. When I finally found the page on the site about family law, it was a two-paragraph little blurb that basically said they’re certified by the State Bar in family law (don’t they have to be to even practice in the first place?).

Not having a dedicated, high-converting landing page is a huge mistake. Based on experience, we estimate the typical local business website converts somewhere around 5 percent. On the other hand, a better-designed landing page can easily convert at 10 percent to 20 percent.

Even if we assume it just converts on the low end — around 10 percent — versus the 5 percent for the typical website, you’d double the amount of leads you get for the same money spent. That means for every $1,000 you spend, instead of getting 10 leads, you’re now getting 20. That difference could literally make or break your month or year.

2. Horrible ads with low clickthrough rates.

Most Google ads say basically the same thing. (And, quite frankly, they’re not all that compelling in the way they say it.)https://5f5bb0d16913097ec5f21c92d081ad60.safeframe.googlesyndication.com/safeframe/1-0-38/html/container.html

As with landing pages, a high-converting Google ad with a high clickthrough rate (CTR) can also instantly double your leads. And the best part is that Google rewards you for having high-converting ads. So not only will doubling your CTR get you twice as many potential leads, but you can also end up paying a lot less per click.

That’s because Google has an algorithm known as Quality Score that determines how much you pay for clicks. In AdWords, just because you bid the most for a keyword doesn’t guarantee your ad will show up in the top position. Google rewards relevancy. And if you can show Google your ad is more relevant than your competitors (and CTR is the number-one factor used to determine relevancy), you can end up ranking higher than your competitors, yet pay less per click than they do. – Read more

#GoogleAds

6 essential Google tools for website SEO

6 essential Google tools for website SEO

The top six Google tools to help grow your website SEO score

Building a website has never been easier than it is today. However, building a successful website is getting harder and harder in a highly crowded space, especially when considering the importance of website SEO (search engine optimization).

While choosing the best web hosting for your website will go a long way to helping you succeed, there are numerous  other tools you should be make use of, and Google’s toolkit is a great place to start. 

In this article, we look at six of the best Google tools. If you’re not already taking advantage of them, it might be time to change the way you work. 

1. Google Ads

If you’ve ever searched for something on Google, you will know what Google Ads look like. Usually, the first one or two results are sponsored listings, which basically means that they are ads. Since these are the first things people see when browsing a particular search term, there’s a decent chance that they will click on one and navigate to the advertiser’s website. 

Of course, this isn’t free, and it can cost quite a bit if you don’t know what you’re doing. But learn how to run effective ads, and you will soon be driving a decent amount of traffic to your website, no matter your budget.

2. Google Analytics

When you own a website, it’s important to understand how it’s performing at all times. It might be that you’re suffering from a high bounce rate, but don’t know why. Or perhaps you’d like to know what your main traffic sources are. Whatever information you’re looking for, Google Analytics can help. 

To get started, you will have to link your website to your analytics console. There are a few ways to do this, but the easiest is to paste a small code snippet into your website source code. Google provides a full tutorial on how to do this. 

Once you’re connected, you will be able to access your analytics portal, where you will find information on everything from visitor demographics and source to your most popular content. And as you can imagine, this information is extremely useful for making future business decisions. – Read more

6 Competitor Insights You Can Get in 30 Minutes

6 Competitor Insights You Can Get in 30 Minutes

Experienced marketers know their company’s rivals inside and out, and they know that there are always more competitive insights to discover. From marketing trends to competitive landscape analysis, traffic dynamics within your market and its key players can uncover a lot.

Let’s look at some of the more complex findings that your rivals’ website traffic metrics can deliver. Set your clock: we have 30 minutes and 6 hidden points to reveal.

The insights below were found with the help of Market Explorer and Traffic Analytics

If you want to learn how to reveal specific website traffic metrics of your competitors, please refer to this article

Competitive Insight #1: Who is Really Leading the Market?

When planning a marketing campaign, you may be looking at your company’s main rival for insights and strategies, but are you looking at everything you should? 

If you only judge your competitors by brand awareness, estimated market share, or frequency of PR appearances, you may be missing the competitor who has the best reach and traffic. 

A better strategy to find a legitimate digital benchmark is to check out the top 5 competitors that are neck and neck with you. 

Identify the one with the highest traffic volume in the last 12 months; note whether they showed exponential or stable growth over the year and if they had any decreases over the period. Whether it correlates with offline popularity or not, take this company’s website as a benchmark and build your campaigns with an understanding of their successful and unsuccessful activities.

Let’s look at some example data below:

In a quest for competitive market analysis, we simply took the biggest-on-the-market food delivery brand, Domino’s, and entered it into Market Explorer. 

The tool automatically gathers the top market players within your industry, showing their traffic, aka online market, share while also reflecting their QoQ, or YoY growth/decline dynamics :

image.png

The Growth Quadrat widget places your competitors within four categories:

  • Game-Changers: sites that are getting big visitor spikes within a short timeframe yet overall have a lower traffic share.
  • Leaders: sites that have both the volume and the traffic growth dynamics.
  • Niche Players: sites with both lower-traffic-share and slower-than-average online market growth.
  • Established Players: sites with a relatively large online market share but lower traffic growth rate.

Further along, make sure to check the companies’ traffic sources and be aware of the one that drives the most traffic. 

You don’t have to go anywhere else in search of this data – Market Explorer dissects your rivals’ key traffic sources and gives a breakdown of each channel’s impact. – Read more

#CompetitorInsights

How to Optimize Your PPC Campaign For SaaS Products

How to Optimize Your PPC Campaign For SaaS Products

The usage of SaaS products has exponentially skyrocketed over the years. So much so that companies have reportedly spent over $343 k on an average on SaaS products every year.

The rapid growth is a result of companies collaborating with PPC or the Profit per Click marketing style. While this may be great news, it brought about a massive increase in competition in the SaaS product market. This, in turn, leads to the PPC SaaS campaigns. 

Before jumping into the possible reasons for your PPC campaign for SaaS products failing, let’s get an understanding of what baselines should be kept in mind to keep a check on your performance. 

How to Incorporate a Primary Baseline to Measure Your SaaS Product PPC Performance?

You must establish a standard for measuring the performance before starting work on a SaaS business through PPC. You must settle down on a limited number of these baselines for measurement of performance! Why? Because it is difficult to follow too many of these metrics, this could lead to you focusing on multiple trending metrics instead of those that are perfect for your campaign.  

Hence, you must limit yourself. The top three best essential baselines to measure your SaaS product PPC performances are as mentioned! 

 Calculating Total Ad Budget

Before you start raking in customers and start making money, you will have to think about maintaining a steady cash flow. To ensure your business is stable, you must calculate the money you will be investing! 

You can calculate the total Ad budget by using the formula mentioned below. 

 The target number of closed deals per month x Target CAC or the amount you will be paying for each customer 

For example – If your targeted CAC is $2000 and you have managed to close two deals in the month, add these numbers to the formula, and you will get your total ad budget to be $4000. 

It is a critical baseline measurement to keep track of your recurring costs, whether you’re adding to them or losing them. 

 Calculating Number of Clicks Needed

Calculating the number of clicks or the click rate helps you know the frequency with which people are seeing and clicking on your SaaS PPC advertisement. A higher number of clicks is a clear indication of your PPC advertisement doing good. 

Following the formula mentioned below, you will find out how many clicks you are garnering. 

Clicks required- Demos required per month/ Visitors to demo conversion rate. 

Let’s put this formula into action! Say your website visitor to demo conversion rate is about 5%; this is your denominator for the clicks you need. Now let’s calculate the number of demos required per month. 

All you will have to do is divide the total deals you closed in the month ( for this equation, it would be 2) by the demo conversion rate. Let’s assume your demo conversion rate is 10%. You would get 20 and that is the number of demos you’ll require per month.

How many clicks does that make? Now divide these 20 demos per month by 5%. Your result would be- 400 clicks.  – Read more

How To Generate Qualified Leads That Actually Convert To Sales

How To Generate Qualified Leads That Actually Convert To Sales

You don’t want just any leads.

You want qualified leads that are highly likely to convert to paying customers. But how can you attract more of them?

Here’s what we are going to discuss today:

  • Why you should stop chasing quantity and focus on quality instead.
  • How to optimize the top of your sales funnel for lead quality.
  • How to identify the most promising leads with lead scoring and disqualify leads with qualification frameworks.

Ready to start generating leads that actually convert to sales?

Continue reading…

The Lead Generation Dilemma Every Marketer Needs To Face

In his article “Facebook Lead Ads vs. Landing Pages: Which Is Better? [Data]”, senior SEO specialist at WordStream, Gordon Donnelly, discusses a dilemma that every marketer faces when generating leads: quality vs. quantity.

“The real issue here is not, are conversion campaigns more effective than lead generation campaigns?

It’s that Facebook lead gen seems to exist on this spectrum where the more we focus on increasing lead volume, the more we run the risk of losing quality; vice versa, the more we focus on quality, the more we run the risk of losing volume,” explains Gordon.

marketing campaign quality and volume arrow diagram

While he was talking about Facebook advertising, this applies to any lead generation method. There’s always a trade-off between quantity and quality. But which one of them is more important?

Why You Should Stop Chasing Quantity and Focus on Quality Instead

You have probably heard the term “vanity metrics” before. These are metrics that do not have a direct impact on your bottom line.

They are called vanity metrics because there’s a temptation to focus on improving them just because it makes you feel good, not because it helps to increase your revenue.

Is the number of leads a vanity metric? It depends on whether they are qualified or unqualified leads. But what’s the difference between the two?

  • Qualified leads are your ideal customers: they know that they have a problem, they are aware that you are offering a solution, and they can afford to pay for that solution.
  • Unqualified leads are not your ideal customers: they may not be aware that they have a problem, they may be unsure of what you are offering, and they may not be able to afford the solution.

It goes without saying that qualified leads convert to paying customers at a much higher rate.

Moreover, they make better customers, since they tend to be less likely to ask for a refund, need less support, and are more open to your other offers.

Of course, an unqualified lead may turn into a qualified lead over time, whether through becoming more aware of the problem, or learning more about what you offer, or simply improving their financial situation.

“So what’s the harm in getting their contact details then?” you may be wondering. “Who knows, maybe they’ll end up buying from me eventually.

But you need to consider the fact that you have limited resources. Your time, energy, and money are finite. So when you spend these resources on acquiring unqualified leads, you have less resources left to invest in acquiring qualified leads.

And since qualified leads convert better, this means that you are missing out on potential revenue.

In other words, unqualified leads are costing you money, which is something that you can’t afford if you are serious about growing your business.

Example: Noah Kagan Saved 47% on His Email Bill by Pruning His Email List

When Noah Kagan, the founder of AppSumo and Sumo, saw his MailChimp bill, it made him sick. “$700?! No thanks,” he thought to himself.

At the time, they had around 105,000 subscribers on their main email list. But on average, only 19% of their subscribers would open and 2.5% would click each email.

“This means MOST people are NOT reading our emails. And this is probably true for you, too,” explains Noah.

But email marketing service providers charge people by the total number of subscribers… So he decided that it was time to prune his email list.

He targeted “not active” subscribers that he defined as people who haven’t engaged with any of their emails in 3 months.

Noah ended up reducing his email list size from around 105,000 subscribers down to 72,000 subscribers. As a result, his email marketing bill went down by 47%, from $719 to $375 per month (savings of $4,128 per year).

“Your ego will be hurt going from 105,000 email subscribers down to 72,000 (like we did),” he says. “But at end of day, worry about results not vanity.”

This is a great example of how unqualified leads are costing you money: you not only pay to acquire them, you then pay to keep them on your email list.

It’s best to avoid acquiring unqualified leads in the first place. Of course, that is not always possible, but simply being proactive about qualifying leads can drastically increase lead quality. And that is going to have a direct impact on your bottom line. – Read more

7 Creative Landing Page Ideas to Inspire Your Next Campaign (With 14 Examples)

Landing Page Ideas

Shower thought: Where do marketers’ *best* landing page ideas come from? Wait—do they get them in the shower?

While some marketers might have their own personal muse, mantra, or go-to sources of inspiration (a lucky shampoo, maybe?), the rest of us are just kinda hoping for something to come to us. And although inspiration can strike at any moment, we don’t always have the time to wait around for it to show up.

So, rather than hoping your next big landing page idea will manifest on its own, we decided to put together a list of creative approaches you can try for your next campaign. Whether you’re looking for the next big design trend or just a cool idea to get you thinkin’, we’ve wrangled seven interesting landing page ideas that can help your business stand out and drive action.

But first! Let me walk you through three tips to make your brainstorming session that much better. 

Why should you care about bringing creative, surprising, or even unusual concepts into your landing page design? Doing something different helps ensure your page packs the punch it needs—both to leave a long-lasting impact on your visitors and, most importantly, get ‘em to convert.

3 Things to Remember When Brainstorming Your Next Big Idea

1. Just like your ads, your landing pages aren’t for everyone (and that’s a good thing!).

Your landing pages shouldn’t be one-size-fits-all. Rather, they should offer a snug, perfect fit for a very specific audience. In fact, niching down your campaign is actually better for qualifying leads. 

Here’s why: Only targeted customers who identify with the unique messaging and design of your ad are going to click it. This self-vetting process ensures those who do reach your landing page are into what makes you (or your one-off campaign) a bit different—which means a higher likelihood of sales, clicks, and conversions. 

2. It’s A-OK for your landing page ideas to be a bit “out there.”

Unlike a core page on your website, landing pages provide an opportunity to play with unique designs, colors, and even messaging that might not fit the rest of your brand. Whether that means getting loud and flashy or trying out some new tagline, there’s nothing wrong with taking some calculated risks!

3. Variants can help you find the best approach.

If you have a few different ideas and want to find out which approach is best, you can run A/B tests on several versions of your landing page to see which converts best. But what if (as is often the case) certain types of visitors respond better to one version than others? That’s where Smart Traffic comes in.

Using AI, Smart Traffic learns and tests different landing page variants to determine which one will most likely convert a specific type of visitor. So when someone new arrives on your page, they’ll be instantly routed to the variant that’s the best match for them. In other words, running multiple variants at once can help you drive the right message to the right person, every time.

7 Landing Page Ideas to Inspire Your Next Campaign

Ready for some serious inspo? These seven landing page ideas will help get those creative juices flowing. Don’t worry, we’ve also included plenty of unique examples to help you visualize your next masterpiece. – Read more

#LandingPages

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7 Tips For Writing An Irresistible Native Ad Headline

7 Tips For Writing An Irresistible Native Ad Headline

Writing native ad headlines can sometimes be more difficult than you initially expect because they require more precision than the regular PPC ads you might already be familiar with. Luckily, there are some things you need to remember that will help you make your native ad headlines stand out. Hence, here are the seven tips for writing an irresistible native ad headline.

#1 Be Concise and Get to The Point

First and foremost, you need to be concise and get to the point right away. As stressed by How To Create Thumb-Stopping Social Ads, it’s important to make your ads look organic, and if you put too much text into them, they will definitely stand out more than they should.

Write a headline that you like. Then, write another one based on the first one, but make it shorter. Strip it down to its basic and most important elements to make it concise and really get to the point of the message you want to convey to your target audience.

#2 Focus on The Audience – Not the Product

Some marketers believe that an ad should focus on the product and try to sell it as effectively as possible. But if you do that, you may start forgetting about the audience which can make your native ad headline too sales-y.

As Harper Donovan from the writing services reviews site Online Writers Rating puts it, “It’s really about finding a balance between the promotional and the valuable aspects of your ad. You need to sell your product – but you also need to do it in a way that doesn’t look like you are only worried about money. That would make it quite unappealing to your potential customers.”

#3 Tell Your Story Through Emotions

Telling your story through emotions is one of the best ways to incorporate both storytelling and branding into your native ad headline. Using emotions will help you connect with your audience better as well as keep their attention quite well.

You need to choose a particular mood for your ads and then stick to it. Do you want it to be inspiring or motivational? Shocking or provocative? Friendly or playful? Once you understand which direction you want the ad to take, you will be able to focus on emotions much better and use them more effectively. – Read more

#AdCopy #WritingAds #GoogleAds

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