13 Landing Page Best Practices to Help You Make a Mark on the Internet

My Post - 2019-08-13T155348.702.pngThe internet is a constant force. A never-ending, all-consuming, stimulating space of new and old information that is updating every millisecond.

And as creators, our job is to make our mark on it.

That can feel a little (okay, REALLY) overwhelming.

But the daunting nature of the internet is the very thing that also makes it our greatest asset. It’s a never-ending, all-consuming, stimulating space where we can share our brand, every millisecond.

A recent study found that U.S. adults spend nearly half a day interacting with media- 11 hours and 6 minutes to be exact. And while the reality of that is a little astonishing, I see it as a major opportunity, and you should too!

Want to know why? Because we are creators.

And as creators who are determined to leverage the full force of the internet in our favor, we have to create content as though our lives depend on it. Because, well, they do.

If you’re wondering how to start leveraging the full force of the internet in your favor, you need to know two words: Landing Pages.

What are landing pages?

Landing pages are hosted web pages where new visitors and existing members of your audience can learn what your brand offers. With landing pages, visitors have the chance to subscribe to your content and/or product in exchange for an email address.

Why are landing pages important for your business?

Easily accessible and hyper-focused with your branded pitch, landing pages serve as a superior lead generating machine for your business.

Think about your own recent Google search- you enter your keywords into the search bar and in seconds, you’re shown thousands of pages that Google deems relevant to your search.

Overwhelm inevitably sinks in as you begin sifting through the pages wondering, “Is this the best answer to my question?” As a consumer, you’re looking for a relevant and quick solution.

Observing your own consumer habits is a great way to anticipate prospective needs. Since you know the journey of a consumer, you know exactly what they need, and you know what they don’t need. – Read more

How to Do Technical SEO for Ecommerce Websites

My Post - 2019-08-09T170524.451.pngEcommerce is one of the fastest growing sectors and is often perceived to be dominated by the likes of Amazon and Walmart.

However, with appropriate marketing strategies, small ecommerce websites can also get their fair share of customers.

That’s where technical SEO comes in. It is crucial for improving your online store’s searchability.

Here are 12 technical SEO tips that will help increase your web traffic and generate more sales.

1. Don’t Miss Out on Long-Tail Keywords

Long-tail keywords may not attract more traffic, but they do have higher conversion rates as they allow you to understand the consumer intent correctly.

For example, a keyword such as “maternity yoga pants” rather than simply “pants” clearly shows what a consumer wants.

You have plenty of opportunities to use long-tail keywords in titles, meta descriptions, and product description.

Think about the various search phrases people may use to find a specific product. They will help identify the best suitable long-tail keywords.

You can use tools such as Ubersuggest, Ahrefs, SEMrush, and Google Trends for this.

2. Use Unique Title & Meta Descriptions

Create unique titles and meta descriptions for each product page. Try to include the relevant long-tail keyword in both the title and the meta description.

Make your meta descriptions as attractive as possible to encourage users to check out the product page.

For example, “Maternity Yoga Pants – best deals, big discounts, and free shipping on all orders. Order Now!” would be a fitting meta description for a maternity yoga pants page.

Ask your developer to insert such unique titles and meta descriptions dynamically into every page. – Read More

Google to Unify App and Website Measurement in Google Analytics

My Post - 2019-08-09T165643.523.pngGoogle is making it easier to measure users’ interactions across platforms with unified app and website analytics.

Currently, businesses have to use multiple products in order to measure app and website engagement – Google Analytics for Firebase and regular Google Analytics.

To simplify the process of measuring engagement across a website and an app, Google is introducing a new property type.

App + Web Property Type

A new property type, App + Web, allows businesses to combine app and web data in one report.

Google to Unify App and Website Measurement in Google Analytics

“Reports for this new property use a single set of consistent metrics and dimensions, making it possible to see integrated reporting across app and web like never before. Now you can answer questions like: Which marketing channel is responsible for acquiring the most new users across your different platforms?”

You can also use this property type to see, for example, how many users started on your app then visited your website to make a purchase. – Read more

Google Keyword Planner Updated to Show the Most Relevant Keyword Ideas

My Post - 2019-08-09T164330.319.pngGoogle has updated its Keyword Planner tool with the ability to show the most relevant keyword ideas based on the seed keyword.

This update is designed to help users prioritize which keywords to add to their Google Ads account.

“For example, when you provide the seed keyword “boots”, you might see keyword ideas such as “womens boots”, “work boots” and “cowboy boots.” You’ll have the option to broaden your search by adding recommended words to your seed keyword.”

– Read more

Google Officially Launches Gallery Ads in Beta

My Post - 2019-08-08T130119.041.pngGoogle’s new gallery ads, first introduced this past May, are now rolling out to advertisers in beta.

Gallery ads were announced at the Google Marketing Live conference, with the company saying the ad units will be launching later this year.

Well that time has come and gallery ads are now available in select languages.

Those languages include: English, German, Japanese, French, Spanish, Dutch, Portuguese, Italian, Russian, Swedish, and Polish.

Gallery ads are a swipeable, image-based ad unit that appear at the top of search results.

They’re designed to help businesses showcase their brand visually with the ability to include up to 8 images.

Each image can have a unique caption, and advertisers can utilize a call-to-action button at the end of the gallery. – Read more

Google Analytics Tutorial for Right-Brained Marketers: 4 Hacks You Didn’t Know

My Post - 2019-08-06T180359.633.pngOver 27 million websites across the world use Google Analytics, yet marketers aren’t sure about its full functionalities or potential to drive creative marketing campaigns.

In this Google Analytics tutorial, we look at:

  • 4 exciting features that you didn’t know Google Analytics comes with
  • Actionable steps on making these capabilities work for you
  • Why Google Analytics makes perfect sense for the creatively inclined “right-brained” marketer

As a marketer, you’ve probably used Google Analytics at some point in your career. It’s the go-to platform for websites around the world, and it’s estimated that over 27 million live websites use Google Analytics.

However, Google Analytics has earned a reputation for being complicated and hard to navigate. If you’re a right-brained marketer, with a penchant for the creative side of things, there’s a chance that you’re losing out on the full functionalities of the feature-rich, Google Analytics.

There are plenty of Google Analytics tutorials out there that tell you how to measure traffic and find patterns in website interactions. But is that enough? What do you do with these metrics if you can’t convert them into actionable insights? We compiled this quick Google Analytics tutorial uncovering hidden tips & tricks to make them work in your marketing campaigns. – Read more

Costly Mistake You Must Avoid in Google Ads

My Post - 2019-08-06T170902.127.pngAds on Google is a blessing to online marketers.

What makes it more attractive and best is that the advertisement is paid only after the dormant customers have seen the ad. In other words, the investment return from the online marketing campaign solely depends on how the marketers select the Adwords. There are a few common mistakes in Google Ads that one must avoid like the

  • Choosing incorrect keywords 

 This is the most common mistake one makes while using Google ads for the first time. One must use relevant, specific and targeted words when using for the online campaign. Useless and broad keywords usually bolt the budget and don’t welcome any conversions. With the help of Adwords Keyword Planner, this problem can be solved when selecting the right keywords.

  • Selecting the right match type 

Apart from choosing the right and relevant keyword, the keyword match should also be appropriate and should match and rhythm with the online campaign. Three kinds of keyword matches have been offered by Google Ads. – Read more

Google Ads Close Variants to Include Words With the Same Meaning

My Post - 2019-08-02T180514.919.png

Google Ads is expanding close variants to include words that have the same meaning as the original keyword.

This change, rolling out in the coming weeks, will impact broad match modifier and phrase match keywords.

Previously, close variants would only match for queries that included at least some variations of the original keywords.

For example, the keywords “lawn,” “mowing,” and “service” would match for “services to mow my lawn.”

Now, close variants can match for queries that do not contain the chosen keywords at all. As long as they share the same meaning.

So those same keywords could match for a query like “grass cutting and gardening services.”

Google Ads Close Variants to Include Words With the Same Meaning

The same changes will apply to phrase match keywords as well. – Read more

Demystifying visibility metrics in Google Ads

My Post - 2019-08-02T175545.317.pngHere are six metrics to help advertisers determine how often – and where in the SERPs – ads are showing up to help identify maximize growth opportunities.

Metrics to assist you in achieving growth in the Google Ads interface are constantly evolving and this can cause issues for even the most experienced of search marketers. Among the most complicated to sort out and understand are the “share” metrics. While they are excellent for identifying growth opportunities and identifying visibility gaps, figuring out which metrics to use when can be frustrating.

Let’s take a look at six of these metrics and how we can use them to identify growth opportunities within the search campaigns.

The competitive metrics

The first four metrics are competitive metrics, meaning that they represent an indicator of where your account is in relation to other accounts that you are competing against within the ad auction. This is an important distinction from the majority of metrics in your Google Ad account.

1. Search impression share

Search impression share is an old favorite. It represents the number of impressions you have received divided by the estimated number of impressions you were eligible to receive. This gives you a percentage that indicates how well your ads are performing in an ad auction. For example, a search impression share of 68% indicates that 68 times out of 100, your ad is showing on the search engine results page, also known as the SERP.

2. Search top impression share

This metric is similar to search impression share, but instead of indicating the percentage of time you are receiving any impression on the SERP, it indicates the percentage of time your ad is showing in one of the top positions, above the organic search results. The calculation for this metric is the number of times your ad is showing in the top positions versus the number of times you were eligible to receive an impression in the top position.

3. Search absolute top impression share

Following the same pattern as the above two, search absolute top impression share is the percentage of your impressions that are shown in the very first paid position. It’s calculated by taking the absolute top impressions divided by the number of times you were eligible to receive an impression in the absolute top position. – Read more

10 Tips to Win at Local PPC

My Post - 2019-08-02T171336.949Local PPC is near and dear to my heart: helping members of the community profit by contributing to their communities is both satisfying and scalable.

From SMBs driving leads to their owner-operated shop to a national brand channeling the trends of an individual location, and everything in between, there are decidedly right and wrong ways to leverage a PPC budget.

Here are my top 10 ways to win at local PPC.

1. Claim Your Local Listings!

Google My Business (GMB) has evolved a lot over the years.

Leaving your brand’s local listing open for a malcontent to wreak havoc on your brand is not only is bad branding, but it also deprives you of a powerful SEO/PPC marketing channel.

GMB allows you to:

  • Monitor and respond to reviews about your business.
  • Share promotions.
  • Unlock placements on the search engine result page (SERP).

The data from GMB helps inform ad placements, as well as provide reviews.

Google my business (GMB)

Unfortunately, GMBs do require a physical address (no P.O. boxes) – some businesses opt to use their home address or main office, while others forgo GMB.

Claiming your location requires requesting a post-card with a unique code (usually arrives in 10-15 days).

It’s worth noting that Microsoft Advertising does not require a claimed listing to include location extensions.

2. Set Campaigns Up by Location vs. Service

There are pros and cons to each, but the structural choice ultimately boils down to the following:

  • Are all of your service areas the same?
  • Are there distinct market indicators that require more budget allocation control?

If different locations you serve represent drastically different market opportunity (due to affluence, demand, and other factors), you’ll want to make the campaigns oriented around your local market, and the ad groups as your services.

location specific campaigns

If the services you offer represent drastically different margins, volume, and other factors that influence your ability to service your customers, you’ll want to make campaigns service focused.

The ad groups will be the different ways those services can be sought after/allow you to layer on audiences for ad copy. In this scenario, all locations would be lumped into one campaign.

service specific campaigns

A major deciding factor is whether you have your GMB claimed for each location (and if it’s possible to have one per location).

As mentioned earlier, GMB opens up additional ad placements, extensions, and ways to engage with your audience.

You can’t tell Google which location to serve, so ideally you’ll only have one GMB listing per campaign. – Read more