How to Set Up Goals in Google Analytics

My Post135.jpgCreating a New Goal

Once you’ve signed into Google Analytics, click Admin, then choose the view you want. From there, look at the View column, and click Goals.

To create a new goal, click +NEW GOAL. You can also choose to import a goal from the gallery, or to click on an existing target to edit it. If the +NEW GOAL or Import options are not visible, it’s because you’ve already created the maximum 20 goals for the current view.

You have three options for creating goals:

  • Use a template.
  • Create a custom goal.
  • Create a smart goal.

To determine if your business is on the right track for growth, it’s important to set goals – but perhaps what’s even more important is making sure you have systems in place that will help you track your progress toward achieving those goals. Thanks to Google Analytics, it’s relatively easy to set and follow goal progress directly from within your dashboard.

To create, edit, and share goals in Google Analytics, you must have Edit permission at the View level in the account you’re working with. If you do not, speak to the administrator of your account to have those enabled.

Using a Template to Create a New Goal

Choose a Template from the list, and click Next to complete the Goal setup. Templates are included within Google Analytics on an industry basis. If your account does not have an industry category selected, you won’t see this option. Once you choose your industry, you can see a list of available templates to use for goal creation.

Creating a Custom Goal

Choose Custom from the list of options, click Next Step, then select the Type of Goal, and click Next to continue setting up your goal.

There are several types of goals:

  • Destination goals
  • Duration goals
  • Event goals
  • Pages/Screens per session

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How to Find Bigger AND Better Audiences to Reach Using Google Analytics

My Post150.jpgTypically, when I kick off a display or YouTube campaign, I try and start out as specific as possible.

First, my targeting usually leans towards remarketing, customer match or placements, but many times I cannot use targeting this specific. I might not have a big enough audience for hyper-targeted remarketing. I might not have a large enough email list. Or my placements may not be going to where I thought they would be.

My next step is usually to create my own custom intent and affinity audiences in an attempt to continue my goal of staying as close to my target user as possible. But, eventually, we hit a point where we just flat-out need to expand our reach to get in front of more people. This requires using the broader targeting options we have in Google Ads. So where do you begin?

If you’re looking to grow your awareness, hold off on spending a ton of money on persona studies. Start by using the free data we have in Google Analytics. Here, I’ll share one way I like to dig into the data to find out what targeting options I should be trying out for my awareness campaigns. And I’ll show you how you can use this to broaden your reach, too.

Getting Started with Audience Reports

The Audience reports in Google Analytics can give us a ton of information about a good percentage of our users. (I’ll get to why I didn’t say “all users” really soon. Just hold on a second.) For the sake of this post, I want to focus on just one part of the Audience section, and that is the Insights report. To get there, select “Interests.” Then, click on the “Overview” page.

Recovering SEO traffic and rankings after a website redesign

My Post142.jpgAfter a review to confirm a drop in traffic, there are some typical problems (like redirects, missing pages and protocol and domain issues) that can be fixed to get your SEO back on track.

When building a new website, retaining and improving your SEO and organic traffic should be a key design goal. This requires a clear understanding of how SEO and website design work together and careful planning for the site migration. If everything is done correctly, you should retain (and improve) rankings and traffic.

Unfortunately, in the real world, this is often not what happens. The site launches. Organic traffic tanks. And then panic sets in. Unfortunately, I get a call like this every week. Most often from small business owners where the loss of organic traffic means that leads or sales slow down and put the business at risk.

It is important to realize that all is not lost and in the majority of cases, there are a few usual suspects to blame for the loss of traffic. In this article, I cover how to diagnose and recover traffic and rankings when a website design goes wrong.

Step 1 – Gathering Information
We don’t need a lot here but in an ideal world we would want the following:

  • Google Analytics
  • Google Search Console
  • Date of launch
  • Website URL
  • Historic or alternative URLs
  • Historic keyword rankings (if available)

Step 2 – Confirmation Read More

Why your Google Shopping strategy is failing and how to fix it

My Post141.jpgIf retailers are to make the most of their advertising budget, they need to take Google Shopping seriously rather than simply diverting budget from text ads to Shopping ads

Expert testing strategies for both low and high volume PPC accounts

My Post140.jpgTesting takes strategy no matter the account size, but low and high volume accounts have different needs. Amalia Fowler and Aaron Levy discussed testing from both perspectives at SMX East.

In a session at SMX East on testing in paid search accounts, speakers Amalia Fowler, account director at Snaptech Marketing, and Aaron Levy, director of paid search at Elite SEM, approached the topic from two polar perspectives: low volume accounts and enterprise-scale accounts. The juxtaposition made for engaging discussion.

Amalia Fowler on testing in low volume accounts

In discussing testing risks and challenges for low conversion volume accounts, Fowler stressed the need to be extra selective and strategic about what you test. She provided a template for a “What if” testing ideas spreadsheet in which teams can collaborate to capture what has been tested in the past, those results and ideas for future tests.

“We need to consider, what would happen if [the test] failed? Is the business going to be okay? Will stakeholders be okay with failure?” said Fowler. Importantly, she added, “We need a hypothesis for every test. That’s the guiding force for the entire testing process.”

Particularly for low volume accounts, it may be necessary to test across multiple campaigns or ad groups. Fowler also said she sometimes lowers the statistical confidence level for a test from 95 percent to 90 percent. Google Ads’ draft and experiments confidence level is 95 percent, she noted. “Define your minimum necessary data. And prepare other people to wait for tests to complete when you have low volume accounts,” she advised.

No matter the account volume, however, Fowler said, “Don’t wait until something is broken to start testing. Be proactive rather than reactive.” For more tips, see the full presentation below. – Read more

5 tips to reduce CPC in Google AdWords

My Post139.jpgRunning Google AdWords campaigns? 5 tips to reduce CPC while not damaging your AdRank, reach, conversions, and performance.

 

6 Ways to Set Up Funnels in Google Analytics

My Post138.jpgAnalyzing the customer journey is pivotal to conversion optimization.

But how do you track user journeys in a way that is digestible, visual, and useful?

With funnels, of course! Funnel tracking in Google Analytics is one of the best ways to identify—in detail—where you’re going wrong.

I’ll show you six funnel features in Google Analytics to boost your conversions by understanding where prospects falter in their journey.

But first, let’s define a Google Analytics funnel and explain why it matters.

What are Google Analytics funnels, and why are they important?
Website users take specific paths from start to finish, and every site has a goal for its visitors. Google Analytics funnels track this journey so that you can optimize your website and ensure visitors hit your goals.

For example, when prospects land on your homepage, you may want them to:

  • Navigate to the category page.
  • Visit a specific product page.
  • Add an item to their cart.
  • View their cart.
  • Make a purchase.
  • See the confirmation page.

By analyzing how visitors browse your site, you can optimize their experience. For example, a funnel analysis that shows a high exit rate on product category pages suggests that visitors aren’t finding what they want, which could be because product filtering is clunky or unhelpful.

Ultimately, your goal is to increase conversions. Analytics funnels help you home in on the exact stage in the journey that’s causing the most dropouts.

Before we proceed to the types of Google Analytics funnels, we need to understand the difference between strict and flexible funnels. – Read more

A Quick Guide For How to Set up a Remarketing Campaign in Adwords

My Post137.jpgDid you know that it costs five times more expensive to get new customers and clients than to get repeat orders?

Well, now you do.

The logic here is simple: the fact that they bought from you before makes it easier to convince them to purchase again.

For this to work, however, the previous customer must be compelled by your service for them to buy the second time around.

I say this because the same principles apply to people who have visited your site!

Instead of waiting for them to reach out to you, you can convince them to become leads faster.

It’s all about setting up a remarketing campaign in Google Adwords.

Why should I do Google Adwords remarketing in the first place?

Let’s face it:

Nothing in the world comes free. Not even the traffic that you get from Google.

You have to work for your site to get on the first page of Google. Effort costs money as well.

The same applies to Google Adwords remarketing – you pay Google to feature your site on the Google Display Network.

But compared to other marketing tactics, people are likely to convert through remarketing by 70%.

Also, the CTR of a remarketing ad is ten times higher than a regular display ad.

The fact that the person visited your site tremendously helps in the performance of remarketing ads.

As a form of display ads, it helps you cut down costs and get higher ROI.

For these reasons, remarketing ads are perfect if you want to make the most of your market. It is considered one of the basic marketing tactics for businesses in developing countries and economies.

But enough about why you should create a remarketing ad campaign. It’s time to discuss how! – Read More

How to Use Google Analytics to Boost Traffic

My Post136.jpgGoogle Analytics can be intimidating.

Maybe you’re one of those people who log in, see your website traffic stats and then leave — everything else is all too complicated to understand. If you are, you’re not alone. In fact, 80 percent of retailers are using Google Analytics incorrectly.
But don’t give up on Google Analytics just yet. Even though it might be overwhelming now, with just a few tips I can show you how to use Google Analytics to increase your website traffic by leaps and bounds. You don’t need to be a tech wiz to implement these strategies that will grow your website visitors from a minuscule amount into a gigantic crowd.
Get ready to learn how to use your website stats to your advantage, here’s how to use Google Analytics to boost traffic.

Look at SEO queries and landing page reports.

To identify “loopholes” in your website where you can increase organic traffic, you need to look at SEO queries and landing page reports. First, though, you need to connect Google Analytics with your Google Webmaster Tools account.
Once these two accounts are connected, you’ll be able to see the top SEO queries for your website that are getting the highest impressions on search engines. Although these results are getting high impressions, they may not be getting high click-through rates.
Look at the SEO report on Google Analytics to see keyword ranking, clicks, and impressions.

Read more

Google launches special Black Friday, Cyber Monday deals ad unit

My Post160.jpgHere’s how you can join the Google’s experiment to show offers at the top of the search results for Black Friday and Cyber Monday.

To help retail advertisers increase their exposure for their Black Friday and Cyber Monday deals this year, Google has launched a new experiment with promotion extensions in Google Ads.

What’s the experiment? Now through Nov. 27, Google may serve a specific Black Friday promotion ad format when people search for the following Black Friday and Cyber Monday related keywords and their variations: “black friday deals”, “black friday <product name> deals”, “black friday <company name> deals” and their variants.

The ads are powered by promotion extensions, which debuted around this time last year.

The ad unit, like the example below, will display at the top of the search results for English speaking users. Users will see a list of offers that link to each retailer’s website.
How to participate. It’s pretty easy to get in on this experiment. What’s less easy is guaranteeing your promotion will display in the list. There are really just two steps to getting started. – Read more