A Beginner’s Guide to Shopping Ads

My Post - 2019-04-11T144601.280.jpgIf you work in ecommerce paid search, then having a working knowledge of Shopping Ads is essential for keeping up with the competition.

This chapter is for the purpose of giving you that working knowledge, and we’re going to do that by focusing on these three components to Shopping Ads:

  • Feed Setup & Management
  • Campaign Setup
  • Ongoing Optimizations

Feed Setup & Management

Because Shopping Ads are automated based on data you send to the engines, shopping feeds are crucial to success in Shopping Ads.

For feeds to work as needed, you need to send the feed with a feed provider (or do it yourself) to Google/Bing Merchant Center, after which you need to link those to the engines so you can actually advertise them.

What are you actually doing in Google Merchant Center?

You are sending your product data to make a feed according to specifications (make sure you get required fields completed, and add as many recommended fields as possible): – Read more

Everything You Need to Know About Ad Extensions

My Post - 2019-04-11T143723.342.jpgAd extensions are an important part of optimizing your paid search ads.

They can help you gain a competitive edge, improve performance, and increase CTR.

Ad extensions also factor into ad rank.

Some of these extensions are manual, meaning you have to set them up yourself.

Others are automatic, meaning they’re automatically applied when certain conditions are met.

And some extensions can be both.

Manual Extensions

Many manual extensions are available to you. But this doesn’t mean you have to use them all.

Instead, take a step back and develop a comprehensive messaging strategy for ads and extensions.

Sitelinks

Sitelinks take people to specific pages on your site.

Sitelinks show in a variety of ways depending on device, ad position and other factors.

You can add sitelinks at the account, campaign, or ad group level.

You can specify the link text (the text that displays in the ad) and URLs (the pages they click to).

Sitelinks can either be manual or automatic.

Sitelinks can either be manual or automatic

When to Use

Sitelinks are relevant to most accounts.

Tips:

  • You can include sitelinks to your business’s LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook and YouTube pages.
  • Each sitelink within a campaign or ad group must land on a unique URL.
  • Relevancy and good Quality Scores help sitelinks impression more often.
  • You can make sitelinks specific to mobile by ticking off the device preference box when building the sitelink.

Callouts

Callout ad extensions let you include additional text to highlight specific information about your business’s products and services.

Callouts will show in a variety of ways depending on device and other factors.

You can add callouts at the account, campaign, or ad group level.

You choose where to add them, create the callout text, and schedule when you’d like them to appear. – Read more

Learning Google Adwords Basics In 7 Steps

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Marketers usually grumble when they are unable to track and measure campaigns and the results associated.

But with Google Adwords, measuring every single aspect of the marketing campaign is possible. It is a paid service to spread the word about your business on search engines.

Not sure how to use Google AdWords for your online business? Here is a step by step Google Adwords guide for beginners.

Set up Account

Setting up a Google AdWords account is easy. As a visitor, you will be provided with the instructions on the web page to make it easy for you to proceed.

Make a list of clear goals that you wish to achieve by using this service. Then plan how you can achieve this.

Once the account is set up, you will be asked to fill in various factors like the budget, locations, network and keywords. This is the starting point for you to start thinking about the ads you want to run. – Read more

Use Google Analytics to Optimize Advertising Spend

My Post - 2019-04-09T111511.102.jpgWhen you think of Google Analytics, what do you think of?

You might think of website metrics, like visits and users. You might think of website usability – bounce rates and time on site. You might even think of goal tracking – transactions and revenue.

Google Analytics does all of that, and more. Which is why it is such a great tool for marketers at companies large and small.

However, most marketers don’t think of Google Analytics as a tool to help you optimize your advertising spend. But it can do that too.

How to Optimize Your Ad Spend with Google Analytics

First, did you know that you can import cost data into your Google Analytics account? You can link your Google Ads account so that all of that data gets pulled in automatically, and then use this article to learn how to add all your other ad spend.

Once you have cost data included in Google Analytics, you can use various ‘Acquisition’ reports to dig into the performance of all your advertising channels. From paid social campaigns like Facebook and Instagram ads, to search ads on Google and Bing, to email marketing and display – you can learn more about how visitors behave on your site when they come through one of these paid channels.

You can see the number of sessions, and calculate the cost for every new visitor to your site. You can see where they go on your site, and how long they stick around. And you can see transactions, including conversion rate, revenue, and cost per transaction. In that way, you can even calculate your return on ad spend (ROAS) for each campaign – that is, how much money is this campaign delivering in revenue for every dollar you spend in advertising.

At this point, you will have a better idea which channels are working and which are not. And you can optimize your budget to spend more in those that are working, and press pause on the campaigns that are not. –  Read more

How to Use an Adwords Campaign to Rock Online Sales

My Post - 2019-04-09T110037.809.jpgEcommerce can be a very lucrative choice of online business. To ensure you maximize your potential, here’s how to use an adwords campaign for your new store.

Did you know around $100 million spent on digital advertising don’t yield results?

This could be due to a number of reasons, like bots, and ineffective strategies. This highlights the importance of a good strategy so as not to waste time, money, and effort.

The same is true in Google AdWords; your success will depend on your strategy. Although it makes it easier to come up with an AdWords campaign strategy, the responsibility of making it work still lies on you.

If you want to know how, read on and learn how you can make Google AdWords work for you.

1. Target the Right Customer

Google AdWords marketing will help you reach your target customer, but you must know who that is. What age group is your customer in and what do they do for a living? If you’re selling shoes, which demographic group is more interested in them?

Upon finding the right persona, AdWords will then help you reach your ideal customer. You can do this by targeting certain locations and bidding on keywords.

2. Research Keywords

This brings us to researching keywords, which is always a must for content marketing. With AdWords, though, you’ll need to do some additional steps, as you’ll need several groups of keywords.

For example, you’ll need a group of keywords for men’s shoes, then a different one for women’s shoes. You’ll need one for every category in your online store, and all these keywords should be specific to the category.

In choosing keywords, the persona of your customer will matter as you’ll then need to know what phrases they use when searching. You need to know their intent, as well; are they the type to go to the gym? In our example, you might want to bid on keywords like “training shoes for gym.”

This expresses intent, which means they’re more likely to convert upon visiting your site. The good thing about it is that it’s more focused, hence they may not be as expensive as general terms. – Read more

Using Alerts in Google Analytics for Slow Site Speeds

My Post - 2019-04-05T115447.574I’ve addressed site speed reports in Google Analytics. Site speed is critical for conversions and, increasingly, for search engine rankings.

In this post, I’ll explain how to set up Custom Alerts in Google Analytics to notify site owners of page speed problems.

Site Speed Alerts

The “Custom Alerts” configuration section in Google Analytics is behind the gear icon in the lower left of any page and under the “View” column.

To create a new alert, click Custom Alerts > New Alert.

For this example, I will create an alert via email and text if my home page for mobile takes greater than 10 seconds to load, on average, on any day. Here are the steps.

  1. Assign a name to the custom alert.
  2. Apply the alert to one or more Google Analytics views.
  3. Select “Day” as the period, so it notifies for all days.
  4. Select to be notified by email, text, or both.

Google Analytics offers limited alert conditions by default. There’s no way to select multiple conditions, such as home page only and mobile only. – Read more

Google introduces new guidelines for linking Google Ads with Google Analytics

My Post - 2019-04-05T114535.679.jpgWebsite owners and digital marketers who use Google Ads to monetize their blogs are often looking for ways to enhance their working and improve their ad performance.

Well, now they can do this by pairing Google Ads and Google Analytics that will give them insights on their ads that can ultimately be used to improve their workings.

According to Google, the customer of today cannot suffice by using traditional marketing funnel. Since no two-consumer purchase journey is the same – the marketers require a more customized approach to reach their prospects.

By integrating Ads and the Analytics feature, the marketers will have a clearer view of how their ads are functioning. This will also enable them to make quick adjustments according to the requirements leading to better performance.

In this regard, the company has published a guide that explains how the users can use Analytics to shape up their ad targeting methods through different methods. Check out the guide, especially if you are planning to use Google Ads method alongside Analytics to improve data tracking protocols. – Read more

Google: The Web is Faster Since Page Speed Became a Ranking Factor

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Google says sites are faster and abandonment rates are down since making page speed a ranking factor last year.

In 2018, Google made page speed a ranking factor for mobile searches.

Around that time improvements starting being observed across the whole web ecosystem. On a per country basis, web pages in more than 95% of countries have improved speeds. – Read more

 

Google Ads Brings Cross-Device Activity Data to All Attribution Reports

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All attribution reports in Google Ads will soon include information about cross-device activity and conversions.

This will provide marketers with insight into how people interact with ads on multiple devices.

Previously, only the Devices, Assisting Devices, and Device Paths attribution reports included cross-device activity.

Cross-device activity is being added to all reports to address an issue with inconsistent conversion counts across different reports.

When this update rolls out, Users should expect to see more consistent conversion counts. However, the existing data will not be changed.

This update is coming into effect on May 1, 2019. As mentioned, the reports will not include cross-device data prior to that date.

That means reports will contain data using different calculation methods – Read more

4 Reasons Why We Need Voice Search Analytics Now

My Post - 2019-04-02T114628.141Most of us already know that voice search is a “thing” and it continues to grow in popularity and importance.

Voice search is here to stay.

The growth of voice search in 2019 continues, even as traditional desktop an mobile searches remain strong.

However, traditional search is starting to have to share a piece of the pie as an increasing number of voice search options are gaining a strong presence.

Based on some research, there is more than enough evidence to show that this type of search will continue to grow and become more prominent over the years to come.

Marketers will need to become more prepared to adjust their digital strategies around this. A few stats:

  • 50 percent of all searches will be voice searches by 2020.
  • 57 percent of smart home speaker owners have made a purchase using their device.
  • 24 percent of smart home speaker owners use their device nearly every day, while 29 percent use it several times a day.

However, although we know voice search queries are growing by the number and in importance, the caveat is there is no solidified way for marketers to track analytics around voice search, yet.

Voice search is really just a keyword, fired through a different medium. But there are no robust reporting platforms out there covering it. – Read more