How Google Ads and SEO Strategies Help to Grow Your Business

If you want your business to succeed and make it popular in the industry, you want it to be visible on Google. It is the primary platform all over the world for people searching for information about any topic. If your business shows up in the top 5 Google search results, you can expect successful click-through and conversion results. However, if it gets lost beyond the first page, it will be difficult for your potential customers to find it unless they specifically look for you.

You want to make sure that you have the right tools to achieve this position. Google Ads and SEO strategies work hand-in-hand to put your business on the map. After all, if your company is not visible on the internet, it won’t gain much traction in this day and age. Almost everyone avails services like Spectrum internet connections to gain constant access to the worldwide web. Therefore, it is necessary for you to use Google Ads and SEO planning to grow your business. They help you achieve success in the following ways and many more.

Put You In The Top Google Search Results

If you focus on Google Ads, you will automatically be placed in the top search results on Google. They even have precedence over the top organic search results. Therefore, it is well worth investing in Google Ads.

The Adwords tool is extremely intuitive and lets you know which keywords will reap the best results, and place you at the top. In addition, you can also overtake your competitors by seeing which keywords they succeed for organically and creating Google Ads with them. However, it is inadvisable to poach words related to their brand or product directly, as Google is smart enough to detect such deceptive practices.

Give You Unlimited Potential Leads

Scalability is a big advantage with solid SEO strategies and Google Ads. Theoretically, you can access a limitless number of potential leads with these methods. This is because new people may be searching keywords related to you every single day.

Therefore, if you properly plan your SEO strategies and run intelligent Google Ad campaigns, you can gain a significant number of genuine leads with potential conversions.

Make Remarketing More Convenient

Often, just seeing your product or services once won’t be enough for a potential customer. You might need as many as 4-5 contact instances to get the customer to actually access your website and buy something.

With efficient Google Ads and SEO strategies, you can connect with your audience at multiple points of the lifecycle multiple times, leading to higher conversion rates. This remarketing is often automatically targeted at people who have previously shown interest in your business or any of its related keywords. – Read more

#GoogleAds #SEOStrategies

5 Mistakes That Google Doesn’t Like and How to Stop Making Them

With Google’s advancements, taking your pages to the next level requires you to work on more than keywords. Earning page one rankings demands a multi-tiered SEO approach that pairs content quality with site authority.

Here are five common reasons pages don’t rank higher – and what you can do to change that.

1. Pages with poor content quality

When someone says they want to rank in search results, I ask, “Do you really think that your content is worthy of page 1?” Most of the time, the answer is no. That’s one contributing factor explaining why 90.6% of pages get zero organic traffic from Google.

In the early days of SEO, the inclusion of the right keywords was all that was needed to rank. Now, Google understands how comprehensive, original, researched, and optimally organized your content is.

Poor quality content with all the right keywords doesn’t make the cut anymore.

How can you create – and signal – quality content? Incorporate these three ideas:

Semantic richness: Google doesn’t just look for single keywords. They look for synonyms, related terms, and subtopics with a semantic relationship to the primary keyword. Expand your content, including meta tags, to optimize for keyword clusters.

Topical depth: Google understands the comprehensiveness of content. Longer content tends to rank higher in SERPs. Plus, Google now digs deeper into web content to deliver search results. Its new Passage Ranking feature finds sections of text – and highlights them in the results – that answers the searcher’s questions. More in-depth content can mean more chances to rank

Interactive on-page elements: Tables of contents, expandable content modules, other interactive JavaScript, and video content all make pages better to navigate and more engaging for users. To address that, improve the page experience. Google will take notice and be more likely to rank it. – Read More

#Google

The Beginner’s Guide to Google Analytics Customizations

Google Analytics is arguably one of the most powerful web analytics applications. It provides insightful data to make it easier for you to understand your website better.

You can easily track and analyze crucial data that lets you see how your website is performing, what’s working and what’s not, and how you can optimize the site and the content for your audience. Plus, it’s totally free!

Easy to see why nearly 50 million websites trust this robust application.

Now, how would you feel if we say you still haven’t unlocked the full power of Google Analytics, even if it’s already installed on your site?

Shocked?

There’s no doubt that Google Analytics is a powerful tool. But you can get more data to optimize your business if you add a few Google Analytics customizations. In other words, you’ll have better campaigns and business decisions. 

The only catch is that you’ll have to use them correctly. 

Why Google Analytics Customization Is So Important

When you run a blog or website, you have questions—lots of them. Google Analytics simply helps answer them.

For instance, you may want to know how many website visitors you have, where they live, how your website appears on mobile phones, or which websites send traffic to your site. Or you may want to find out how effective your marketing tactics are, the kind of blog content your visitors love the most, or which pages on your website are most popular. – Read more

#GoogleAnalytics

Google Keyword Searches with the Lowest and Highest Competition

Google Keyword Searches with the Lowest and Highest Competition

To find niche opportunities in transactional keywords, we reviewed our database of 20 billion queries for the lowest competition Google keyword searches filtered by keyword modifiers. The aim was to uncover untapped opportunities for a long-tail strategy.

We also reviewed high competition terms that could offer an insight into buyer psychology and behavior as a starting point for a more high-level keyword strategy.

If you want to try searching for transactional keywords in your niche, use the modifiers from the tables of data below, in combination with your seed keywords in the Keyword Research Toolkit or Google Keyword Planner.

Low Competition Google Keyword Searches for Transactional Queries

High competition keywords may be considered valuable, but the other end of the scale is where you can find some of the best opportunities. Combine the strength of several low competition keywords and you may end up with a solid long-tail strategy that can deliver significant quick wins.

Low Competition Google Keyword Searches for Transactional Queries

High competition keywords may be considered valuable, but the other end of the scale is where you can find some of the best opportunities. Combine the strength of several low competition keywords and you may end up with a solid long-tail strategy that can deliver significant quick wins. – Read more

#KeywordSearches

Facebook Ads vs. Google Ads: Which is Better for Your Brand?

Facebook Ads vs. Google Ads: Which is Better for Your Brand?

If you’re reading this article, it’s likely because you’re considering running digital ads.

You’ve heard about Facebook Ads and Google Ads but you’re still unclear on the difference between the two platforms.

In this article, we’ll cover each platform’s unique features, the key differences to keep in mind, and the factors to consider when deciding which ad platform to use.

Let’s get started.

What is the difference between Facebook Ads and Google Ads?

Facebook Ads is an advertising platform used for paid social campaigns on Facebook while Google Ads run search and display ads. While they both run pay-per-click (PPC) ads, they do so on separate channels and often target users at different stages in the buyer’s journey.

These platforms are often pitted against each other but in fact, Facebook Ads and Google Ads are complementary, each offering unique benefits to marketers.

If your team can only focus on one, there are a few things you’ll want to consider.

Your Campaign Goal

What do you want to accomplish with your campaign? Is it brand awareness, leads, sales, or something else? Knowing this answer can already steer you in the right direction.

Google Ads is ideal for demand capture – meaning reaching users who have high purchase intent. For instance, if I’m looking up the keyword “water bottle,” this may signal an interest in purchasing one.

With that in mind, the ads below align well with search intent and can lead to sales.

Google search ad example

Facebook Ads, on the other hand, is ideal for reaching consumers who are near the top of the funnel, (i.e., great for brand and product awareness). – Read more

#GoogleAds #FacebookAds

Local is now digital: Understanding the new local shopper

Local is now digital: Understanding the new local shopper

COVID-19 has fundamentally changed how consumers shop worldwide; they rely more on the Internet to research and discover products to buy. For example, search interest for products like the “best exercise bikes,” “best ring lights” and “best air fryers” increased by 100% or more in the last year. To make it easier for consumers to discover top products and the best places to buy them, Google launched the Best Things for Everything Guide.

We’ve seen that shoppers don’t just turn to Google for things they want to buy on the web; they also use Google to find what they need nearby. Over the past year, we’ve seen a significant increase in commercial intent across Google including Google Search, Google Maps and YouTube.

Finding what’s nearby on Google Search

Whether it’s to support small businesses in their community or ensure a nearby store has the item they need in stock, consumers are using Google Search to thoughtfully research their shopping trips in advance. 

  • Searches for “local” + “business(es)” have grown by more than 80% year over year, including searches like “local businesses near me” and “support local businesses.”
  • Searches for “who has” + “in stock” have grown by more than 8,000% year over, including searches like “who has nintendo switch in stock” and “who has gym equipment in stock.”
Icon of a blue rising arrow over a store icon. Text says: "Searches for "who has" + "in stock" have grown by over 8000% year over year in the U.S.

Beyond retail searches, we’ve seen an increase in online research before heading out to a restaurant or to get takeout. At Google, we recently found that:

  • Two out of three dining consumers said they used search to find food and beverage information during the pandemic.
  • Fifty-seven percent of dining consumers said they discovered food and beverage information during the pandemic via online ads.

Exploring new products on YouTube

YouTube has become a critical part of not just the shopping process, but the local shopping process too. In a recent U.S. Google/Talkshoppe study, we found that:

  • Forty-five percent of viewers say they watch YouTube to see a product demo before buying.
  • Viewers say they are 2x more likely to go in-store or online to buy something they saw on YouTube versus the competitive average.

Starting their journey on Google Maps

Google Maps has become a more critical part of the local user experience, as people use Maps to explore something they’re interested in, versus just for navigation: – Read more

Local is now digital: Understanding the new local shopper

COVID-19 has fundamentally changed how consumers shop worldwide; they rely more on the Internet to research and discover products to buy. For example, search interest for products like the “best exercise bikes,” “best ring lights” and “best air fryers” increased by 100% or more in the last year. To make it easier for consumers to discover top products and the best places to buy them, Google launched the Best Things for Everything Guide.

We’ve seen that shoppers don’t just turn to Google for things they want to buy on the web; they also use Google to find what they need nearby. Over the past year, we’ve seen a significant increase in commercial intent across Google including Google Search, Google Maps and YouTube.

Finding what’s nearby on Google Search

Whether it’s to support small businesses in their community or ensure a nearby store has the item they need in stock, consumers are using Google Search to thoughtfully research their shopping trips in advance. 

  • Searches for “local” + “business(es)” have grown by more than 80% year over year, including searches like “local businesses near me” and “support local businesses.”
  • Searches for “who has” + “in stock” have grown by more than 8,000% year over, including searches like “who has nintendo switch in stock” and “who has gym equipment in stock.”
Icon of a blue rising arrow over a store icon. Text says: "Searches for "who has" + "in stock" have grown by over 8000% year over year in the U.S.

Beyond retail searches, we’ve seen an increase in online research before heading out to a restaurant or to get takeout. At Google, we recently found that:

  • Two out of three dining consumers said they used search to find food and beverage information during the pandemic.
  • Fifty-seven percent of dining consumers said they discovered food and beverage information during the pandemic via online ads.

Exploring new products on YouTube

YouTube has become a critical part of not just the shopping process, but the local shopping process too. In a recent U.S. Google/Talkshoppe study, we found that:

  • Forty-five percent of viewers say they watch YouTube to see a product demo before buying.
  • Viewers say they are 2x more likely to go in-store or online to buy something they saw on YouTube versus the competitive average.

Starting their journey on Google Maps

Google Maps has become a more critical part of the local user experience, as people use Maps to explore something they’re interested in, versus just for navigation: – Read more

What Are Pageviews in Google Analytics?

If you own a website, chances are that you’ve put a lot of work into making your site accessible to users. But have you ever wondered if there’s a simple way to see whether your work is paying off? It’s possible to find your answer in your pageviews.

But what are pageviews? How do they work in Google Analytics, and how can you use them to understand the performance of your website against your competitors? Read on to find out.

In this guide, we’ll show you where you can find your pageview statistics, how you can examine the reach of your website, and how to be sure that your competition isn’t ranking higher than you. We’ll also give you top tips on improving your pageviews and site reach. 

Pageviews vs. Sessions vs. Users

First, let’s define three key terms you’ll need to know: 

  1. Pageviews: Google defines a pageview as “an instance of a page being loaded (or reloaded) in a browser”. Every time someone starts a session by opening and viewing a page on your website (regardless of whether they’re loading or reloading it) you get one pageview. 
  2. Sessions: A session is a period of activity completed by a user. Google Analytics records a session every time someone visits your website. Sessions start as soon as a page is opened, and cookies are activated, and ends after users have been inactive for 30 minutes by default. 
  3. Users: A user is an individual who visits your page. Every new user gets a unique client ID that’s stored in their browser cookie, which lets Google track and identify their sessions.

What Is a Pageview in Google Analytics?

The Google Analytics tool can help you track your pageviews. This allows you to see how many views you received on different pages of your site and thus provides insight into the content that is most accessible or interesting to users. – Read More

10 common email marketing mistakes

10 common email marketing mistakes

To emoji or not to emoji? Can sending a test email actually harm deliverability? Is my title too vague? Too specific?

Email marketing is an artform and mastering it takes more than a quick how-to. But even if you’re a pro at emails, you may be making minor mistakes that can have a major impact on deliverability.

In this episode, we’re walking through 10 common email marketing mistakes to avoid, plus, a few bonus tips and tricks for prime deliverability. We also mention a few big brands that miss the mark.

Main takeaways

  1. Your “friendly from,” or sent from email address should be a name your subscribers recognize.
  2. Don’t use too many emojis in your subject line. Emojis can look cheap and spammy.
  3. Don’t type out a full URL. Instead, add a link to a click here button.
  4. Don’t send too many emails in a short period. This leads to subscriber burnout.
  5. Proofread your emails before sending them.
  6. If you’re setting up a DMARC, make sure you’re doing it correctly.
  7. Clean out your list regularly. Otherwise, you’ll keep emailing cold subscribers which harms your deliverability.
  8. Think about your needs and carefully choose one ESP. Don’t bounce from one ESP to the next.
  9. Don’t put so much content and imagery in an email. The email may get cut off.
  10. Use a double opt-in! Otherwise, you’re bound to have subscribers on your list who didn’t mean to subscribe. That’s a fast-pass for complaints and cold subscribers.

7 Easy Steps to Install Google Analytics in WordPress

Do you ever wonder how your website is performing? How many people visit your website? What the conversion rates are? What your bounce rate is? You and millions of other people. That is why Google Analytics exists. 

Knowing your website’s stats is important. If you’re running a business, analytics is something you need to know. Seeing the strengths and weaknesses of your website can help you turn things around and make sound business decisions. The best way to get all of this information in one place is via Google Analytics. 

Google is the #1 search engine in the entire world, so you can trust that the analytics they offer are based on the unfathomable amount of data they collect daily. And if that’s not enough to convince you, it’s also free. You get in-depth detail about the people who visit your website so that you can better strategize what is best for your business. 

There is a lot to this software, so you may feel overwhelmed at the amount of information housed in your Google Analytics profile. However, do not let the fact that it has a learning curve let it stop you from using it because the benefits are enormous.

Why Installing Google Analytics in WordPress is Worth It

Knowing what your users want and what their habits are is vital for the success of your site. When using Google Analytics, you can track and understand what your customer/website visitor is doing and other things you may never have even thought about. 

Imagine knowing exactly what people want when they come to your website and giving it to them. Imagine providing an excellent experience to nearly everyone that lands on your page. Google Analytics, when used correctly, has the power to give these things to you. There is so much you can do with it. 

Here are some of the reasons why you should install Google Analytics on your WordPress site. 

It’s free.Read more

#GoogleAnalytics #WordPress